Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving to all. How many of you are baking this thursday with vegtables you so diligently worked to raise this past summer. I will not be because I all my plants died from the frost months ago and I never got around to planting the pumkin seeds I still have. Oh well thats why theres a walmart Happy Thanksgiving Chuckie in the frozen north! zone 5
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On 11/22/05 10:09 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com, "Chuckie"

I won't be cooking anything I grew because I eaten the tomatoes already and the herbs are long since gone.
But I will be roasting root veggies all day in preparation of driving to my aunt's house for the day.
Cheryl
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I do still have tomatoes from my garden, which we did not eat today - but everyone who wanted one got one little piece of parsnip harvested today and roasted in the pan with the duck.....yum
wrote:

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wrote:

We didn't have anything from the garden except potatoes, but we had a wonderful turkey I shot Tuesday.
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The US Thanksgiving comes far too late in the harvest season -- Sukkot is much more intelligently placed in the calendar, IMO.
The only vegetables I grew that appeared on the menu were potatoes. We also had the very last of the season's chanterelles that we picked.
--
Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky
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Potatoes, brussel sprouts and carrots from the garden were on my Thanksgiving menu this year. Pretty cool, picking brussel sprouts three hours before they were to be cooked! The carrots were so sweet from the frost, everything went well. Next year I'll have squash, too (they didn't do well this year, although the cukes were awesome).
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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[...]

[...]
?? Hadn't heard that one. Is it actually GOOD to leave carrots in the ground to be exposed to frost?
Basically an intellectual question, as we do not have frost, but I am very curious.
Also, does this apply to other root crops?
Thanks
Persephone
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government is a standstill -- little better
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Aspasia wrote:

A mild frost won't hurt, but I would harvest the carrots immediately. If you want to keep root crops (and tubers) a cood, dark, not too dry place is best. Such places used to be called "root cellars", and were standard equipment on houses and farms built up into the early 20th century. My grandmother kept carrots in a bucket filled with sand down in the cellar. They lasted at least half the winter IIRC.
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We have one outside made of concrete and bricks. 3 feet deep. Baskets of roots placed in and topped with hay. Wooden top provided not perfect. Sort of like a cool/cold humidified storage area.
Sometimes potatoes in February.
Bill
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Garden Shade Zone 5 S Jersey USA in a Japanese Jungle Manner.39.6376 -75.0208
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I pile leaves on top of the beds and harvest the carrots (and beets) well into deep winter. Sometimes things get too frozen, but usually I can still dig in January.
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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I've tried the bucket of sand routine and found that the carrots got wimpy fairly soon. It's possible that my basement was too warm.
I find it easier to leave them in the ground. I pile leaves over them about 3' deep. The ground doesn't freeze. I put a shovel in the ground at each end of the pile so that when the snow levels out the field I can find the carrots, and then the shovel is always handy (although the winter is hard on shovel handles). The carrots are crisp and sweet until March (New England, Zone 5). After March, they start to grow again and start to use up the sugars stored in the root so they're not as good.
Wolf Kirchmeir wrote:

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Aspasia wrote:

I don't know about carrots but it is true for parsnips.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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Next year I'll have parsnips for Thanksgiving, too! <G>
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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