from a dead looking stick

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On 10/31/07 1:35 PM, in article h13Wi.79378$%B2.28053@edtnps82, "C_L_R_D"

Stay warm and safe... C
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This morning it was 34. Now it is 68. First fall day to use the house furnace. No frost yet, mosquitoes are actively feeding! east TN
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Phisherman wrote:

it'd be my guess of how there needs to be an exact weather condition where the correct combination of cool air in alliance with a specific amount of moisture are timed into coexistence with one another in order to form a proper frost. but, that's all simply a speculation on my part since I'm not schooled in the science of meteorology.
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on 10/30/2007 6:37 AM Cheryl Isaak said the following:

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Jim wrote:

That "rose" has palmate leaves which I have never seen on a rose before. Usually they are compound. The blooms and buds sure look like roses.
Does anyone know its botanical name or another common name for it? I doubt it would be cold hardy in my zone. I would like to see if there is anything like it on helpmefind.com.
The only other rose I saw with very unusual leaves was what some thought might be an alba; instead of the usual five of 7 leaflets on one stem, it had several more pairs than that.
I have just learned that roses may root from "sticks" if you put them in the ground when they are dormant. So when you say "stick", I assume that there are no leaves and that it was dormant when you put it in the ground. It must root easily; sometimes it helps to use rooting powder, but I guess them thar Confederate roses root like Forsythia.
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Hettie wrote:

[....]
http://www.ask.com/web?q=Growing+Confederate+Rose&qsrc=6&o=0&l=dir
the above URL points to the search results provided by ask.com
I hope you find the information useful and informative.
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Jim wrote:

Two links took me to Dave's Garden and several other interesting articles which were indeed informative. Lovely thing. Hibiscus mutabilis.
Each person in their own way contributed to solving that mystery, and Confederate Rose was not incorrect either. Alas, only grows in zones 7 to 11, wouldn't want to try it as an annual although if seeds started early enough, would bloom the first year.
If and when I have the time, may try to grow one as a potted plant and bring it in for the winter. It is a pretty thing.
Thanks for all the good comments and links.
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Hard to remember. Sorry about that.
Thanks again for the responses.
TOTB wrote:
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TOTB wrote:

you are most welcome.
now onto resolving the next mystery.
http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/t/h/theplanter/wildrose.html
I call these wild roses. they were growing along side the highway and every year just as they were about to bloom the hwy maintenance people who were watching via their secret satellite would send a crew out to mow them down. I got tired of that so I dug some of them up and moved them to several different locations here on the Farm. there are white ones, pink ones and red ones. the URL exhibits a pink one utilizing the chain link of the dog pen as a means to climb.
I call them wild roses but have no idea what they'd be called by one who is schooled properly in the science of horticulture.
Jim in central NC
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Jim wrote:

I'm no rose expert by any means, but those are roses, and beautiful ones at that. You may have saved an heirloom rose that escaped from an old garden. It could be "wild", but it looks cultivated at one time, and the truly wild ones I'm familiar with that at least used to grow (they spray now so much) in the ditches in northern Illinois are not double like that and don't climb.
There is a rose ID forum at gardenweb.com. It is a free site, you have to pay at Dave's Garden, but a lot of the latter's info is available to a non-subscriber, as we saw with your hibiscus.
Maybe you could try at gardenweb with your photos, their popup/down/whatever ads will drive you nuts, but the site is worth it. I guess you need a browser like Firefox with some add-ons to stop them cold.
Anyway, their hit ratio with positive id's isn't so great, but there are many more rosarians there than here, and some are truly expert. So many, many roses look so similar, and they even vary from grower to grower of supposedly the same exact rose.
Anyway, ya done a good thing to save that beautiful rose. Actually, you saved several different kinds there. And it didn't die from transplant shock, looks like it is happy there. I'm trying to save old roses, too, but I haven't dug any out of ditches yet, and you have to be careful if it is somebody's property to get permission, guess I don't have to tell you that. I'm going the cutting route to try to propagate more of what I see I think is worth saving or get more of them spread around eventually in case they die out or some property owner doesn't want them and digs them out and throws them on the trash heap.
Right now I'm very anxious about some cuttings I'm trying to root under lights I set up of a rose the exact same color as your photo looks, but the bloom is different, double though. Is yours a once-bloomer or a repeater or do you know yet?

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Hettie said:

DG has the largest, online, plant database. The ID forum is second to none. And, what's wrong with $25US per year? There's so much more to that site, that non-subscribers don't see. Anyone serious about knowing their plant's identification and growing information would surely find it a sound investment.

I use Firefox, and won't go anywhere near that popup-hell. Besides, a lot of gardenweb members also post at DG. IMO, the quality of information found at DG FAR outweighs the quality of information at gardenweb.

I've seen VERY few identification requests at DG go unsolved. Usually, they are the rarest of the rare plants that don't get identified, there.
[rest snipped]
Jim, I've no idea what your rose is, sorry. I detest roses. =)
--

Eggs


A foolproof method for sculpting an elephant: first, get a huge block of
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wrote:

Not really a rose, read more here: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/714 /
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that rose is a Hibiscus. Jackie

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You are correct. it isn't a rose at all, but is in the mallow family. It is Hibiscus mutabilis.
Emilie
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Hettie said (on or about) 10/30/2007 19:28:

Looks like okra leaves. Hibiscus?

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I'm sure I;ve seen this in Red growing on roadside in Mid Tennessee.
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The botanical name is Hibiscus mutabilis, but Googling on the exact phrase "Confederate rose" works. Google finds more than 25,000 hits on the common name.
Two nice ones near the top of the list are:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/southerngarden/hibiscus.html
http://www.floridata.com/ref/H/hibis_mu.cfm
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