compost

Page 2 of 2  
Mark Thorson wrote:

Presumably the new generation BioCorp stuff?
Regards, Martin Brown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Having some experience in grocery stores, I noticed something out of the ordinary in your statement. Refuse plates and utensils, usually styrofoam of some sort and plastic correspondingly, originate from a eating area in the grocery store. Not something off the shelf in the grocery store proper. Typically, the eating area requires a food preparation area to supply it. Along with that, there may be warming areas for grab and go hot foods, cold foods bakery items, and so forth. These have short shelf lifes, and are typically tossed while still in their containers. The food scraps from the eating area are exceedingly small compared to the volume by the plates and utensils. There are probably styrofoam or plastic cups involved from the eating area and placed in same refuse receptacles in the eating area.
3 other primary food waste areas in a grocery store are produce, meat market, and dairy. These are not typically mixed with prepared food waste. But, if compacted, do end up in the same location. The only grinding waste may occur in the meat market.
I know produce waste has alot of plastic, paper, and wire ties within it. Other than prepared green foods, my parents also disposed of bacon grease and soured milk in a 1/2 gallon milk carton. Buried contents in the garden regularly. That was well before hormonal, and present chemicals were added to foods though. They did not to feel good, but, made the garden grow more robustly.
--
Dave



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 30 Jul 2008 02:59:18 -0700 (PDT), RichD

There are jillions of excellent websites on the subject. Some of the best are through local Cooperative Extension programs from educational institutions like WSU, Florida State and Cornell.
My own practice of composting includes both a compost pile and a worm box. The compost pile works by bacterial decomposition (mostly) and gets real hot. It gets lawn and garden debris. The fresh veggie scraps go into the worm box. Worm poo is an outstanding fertilizer. The compost pile gets dug up and mixed into the soil only once or twice a year, while the worm box produces continuously, more or less.

F*** the environment -- composting is better, cheaper, safer, and you can do it all yourself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rich
In MODERN ARBORICULTURE we compost our tree trimmings that have been chipped. When we say composted tree trimmings we mean that the material has sat in a pile for at least a year. The stuff I use and sell is 2,3, or even 4 years old. It has a nice dark color acquired by the composting process. I do not use dyed mulch. The compost meaning that the living parenchyma cells have dies and the contents of the cells are digested. I.e., the parenchyma cells that made up the sapwood at time of trimming. The problem with using fresh chips is that the protoplasm from the inside of the parenchyma cells gets smeared all over the place. This protoplasm attracts undesirables that can and do do nasty things to trees above as well as below ground. This could cause disease. The microorganisms attracted to protoplasm are those that attract defense cells in trees. Now, the webwork of living parenchyma cells in trees (all parts of a tree are born alive) is collectively and correctly termed the "symplast". The cells are connected and can conduct electricity, thus the SHIGOMETER (a pulsed uhm meter) comes into play. Now the more composted the wood chips, leaves and needles the better. The more composted the less chances of artillery fungus on your house or structure. I cannot mention mulch without some lucid instruction.
1. Do not remove grass by digging before mulching. Because the grass roots grow deeper than the non-woody roots of the tree which would be removed with the grass. Just cut the grass low and place mulch on top. 2. Mulch should be kept back at least 6" from trunk and trunk flare. Should not touch trunk. 3. Mulch should be no more than 3-4" thick. If the non-woody roots grow into this gradation of mulch then you have too much and some should be removed. When this mulch dries out first, as it does, the non-woody roots die and abscission zones do not form and an entrance for micro's into the tree is created. 4. Mulch should be FLAT! 5. Done correctly mulch plays a key role in vitality management of the tree as well as associates. 6. I mention this gradation because in nurse logs or fallen trees in a forest roots from other trees grow into nurse logs into holes created by organisms such as borers. The nurse log will become a sponge and retain water for the trees to use during dry time. What I am trying to say is mulch comes in different gradations.
This is what composting means to be. When wood breaks down to a material like coffee grounds, the material is termed "new soil". The major theme in nature is buildup and breakdown. Composting is a break down process.
This are my thoughts on compost with respect to MODERN ARBORICULTURE and A NEW TREE BIOLOGY!
MULCH stuff: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/mulch.html
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Whilst I agree with you. Sometimes there's not enough space in the garden to store the fresh tree mulch.
I pruned back a row of pine tree hedges about 6 months back. There was just way too much mulch for the compost pile. I stacked as much as i could in that pile and for the rest - I ended up piling a lot of the fresh mulch onto parts of the garden beds which I consider - secondary - meaning if the plants there die - it don't matter.
What happened was that the margurite daises are doing well. In fact, the compost piles went ok. Didn't kill anything - and helped to supress the weeds if i piled a layer three inches thick.
However, there was a massive bloom of yellow flowering clovers - particularly in areas where the mulch was the thinest. Perhaps the mulch had a rich store of nitrogen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pile up a bunch of stuff and let bugs, worms, microbes, fungi do the rest.

Has low levels of NPK, so it's not a potent fertilizer, although it can be used as potting soil if aged a couple or more years; my five-year old lawn waste compost outperforms expensive, quality bag soils like Pro-Mix Ultimate Organic. It improves soil texture (or "tilth"), most notably helping heavy clay soils drain better and loose soils hold moisture.
Compost also boosts soil's beneficial microbe count, helping plants extract nutrients from otherwise poor soil with less need for fertilizers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.