Clematis

I just planted a clematis this spring. It was looking terrible, only about 6 inches tall, and so I pinched it way back and now it is coming back okay, probably a foot and a half long and two rungs up on the trellis. My question is, will I have any blooms this year, doesn't look good so far, and how big can I expect it to get next year? I am in Cold Zone 3, my sister has an old beautiful one at her house, it was there before she moved in, so she doesn't know how long it takes to establish.
Anyone out there help me?
thanks
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wayneandmary wrote:

It likely won't bloom this year but you should see blooms next season. As far how large it will grow next year, that depends on several things - the weather, the variety, where it is planted. You need to do some research on the variety you planted, especially pertaining to pruning. One good site to visit (and the are MANY more on the net) is http://www.homeofclematis.net /
Do a google search, http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&q=clematis&btnG=Google+Search and you will find all the information you need to keep your clematis healthy for many years. I have two that are over 20 years old (pictures of them are on my web site).
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Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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A general rule of thumb with clematis is it takes 3 years to become well established. You won't see any more blooms this season, but you will get some next season. The following year, you should get lots of blooms and it should really take off after that. Be sure to prune it properly depending on which type of clemetis it is. You may also need to offer some winter protection depending on which clematis you have. How big the plant will get really depends on which cultivar you have. Some clematis only grow 4' to 6' tall, while others can reach 30' tall. good luck, Matt in MI

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Check out the Washington Post's website (Garden section). Excellent article written by (I think) a guy at the National Arboretum is excellent & will tell you everything you want to know. It's a registry site BTW.
Long & short: Ideally, dig a hole 4 feet deep (yes, four). Two is OK, but digging only to the contours of the nursery post delays development. Foliage likes sun, roots like it cool and damp. 3 years needed for good blooming, so be patient. Good luck.
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We planted a 'President' Clematis in late June. It is in full sun and has gotten plenty of water. It seems to be dying from the top down. The top has brown leaves and the next lower ones are turning brown. What am I doing wrong or what should I be doing to save this plant. Thanks for any help.
Gail
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Gerry Leath wrote:

You may be over watering your Clematis. I would back off on the watering and see if that fixes the problem.
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Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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wilt, a vascular problem which prevents moisture and nutrients from being drawn up through the plant tissues. The plant wilts and dries up, typically from the top down. Cut back below the lowest signs of damage and keep the plant well watered. It should come back fine next season - clematis wilt is seldom fatal.
For future reference, species clematis are much more resistant to wilt than the hybrids and you can often outsmart the wilt by careful planting. This is a case of preparing a $50 planting hole for a $10 plant. Dig a hole 18" deep and as wide and incorporate some compost into the back fill. Plant the clematis 4-6" deeper than it was in the nursery container and water in well. This will encourage the vine to produce additional shoots from the root crown - the more top growth in terms of stems or vines, the less likely the plant is to suffer from wilt. Clematis are also heavy feeders. Apply a complete rose fertilizer to the root zone every 6 weeks during the growing season.
pam - gardengal
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wrote:

Probably nothing. Mine look a bit ragged (brown leaves and vines) too, but that's normal for them. It takes a year or two to become established. Mulching with compost now will pay off next year. Be careful when you prune, if not sure don't touch it.
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