Citrus in pots?

Am considering a grapefruit,Valencia Orange and a Meyer lemon tree for my yard in Gilbert AZ. Not really sure where I want to plant them, plenty of space, I kind of like the idea of putting them in LARGE decorative pots as I have seem them planted that way in several places. BUT I wonder, what kind of growth can I expect out of them if they are in pots? I would like to see decent sized "trees"( I know the lemon is technically a bush), but will the pot size limit this growth? Thanks Brandon
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The pots will limit their growth and will probably prevent them from having much fruit. UNLESS... you get really, really big pots. I would plug these into the ground and let 'em rip if you want fruit. Keep in mind that the average fruit tree produces enough fruit for several large families each time it bears fruit.
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Gilbert, AZ, being 20 miles SE of Phoenix, is probably a safe bet for putting citrus in the ground. I don't know your climate data but I wouldn't think it gets in the mid 20's in the winter so you'd be o-k. A lot of Satsuma and Mandarin oranges on tri-foliate rootstock are cold-hardy to around 22 degrees in Houston, TX. If a hard, hard freeze does hit here, a large vat of water placed next to the tree moderates the climate around it. I heard some will place a blanket on the ground covering the trunk. I even heard one guy wrapped Christmas lights around the tree.
Dr. Bob Randall, http://www.urbanharvest.org , recommends putting citrus in the ground, don't let it get over 9 feet tall and scaffold prune it for strength in January.
JK
Brandon wrote:

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Brandon wrote:

If you want citrus in containers, consider dwarf trees. I have a Eureka lemon, a Robertson navel orange, and a kumquat, each in an 18-inch tub in my back yard (redwood tubs 18 inches in diameter and 18 inches deep). The lemon and orange grow like small trees; the kumquat remains like a bush.
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Ahhhh, that is a consideration for got about dwarf trees. I think the size is a factor though, I really want to have good substantial trees eventually, looks like they are going into the ground. One consideration as well...how far away from the reflectivity of the pool should they be?
Thanks Brandon

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I have a Tahitian lime tree in a pot next to a brick wall, and the plant gets most of the afternoon sun.
Sadly, I have had only 3 limes the whole 3 years it has been planted.

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Peter Jason wrote:

The amount of fruit might depend on the variety of lime.
On the other hand, citrus in a container does respond well to feeding and watering. In a container with well-draining potting mix, the tree needs more water than in the ground. This tends to leach out nutrients, which you must replace with frequent but light feedings.
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