%#&@#% flea beetles!!!

They found my eggplant already and I'm just hardening them off. They won't go into the ground until next week.
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Me too, but I put mine in already. They're getting chomped. So far I put neem on them and it seems to be working. As of today.
Diesel
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What sucks is years ago I used to ;plant an excess of crops and compensate for bug losses. And be happy and oblivious to the bugs. And let the chewed up stuff rot.
Now , Well, its not so fun anymore...... But my stuff looks better.
Diesel.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.none says...

http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/fleabeetle.html
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Steve Peek said:

won't

Try sprinkling the plants and the top of the soil with coffee grounds.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"Vegetables are like bombs packed tight with all kinds of important
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In article

Caution! I put coffee grounds around a squash last year, and it took an immediate turn for the worse and was dead within a month, even with subsequent removal of the coffee grounds and application of copious amounts of water. I didn't sprinkle the coffee grounds, I mulched. Tread lightly. With blueberries and potatoes, I've never had this problem.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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wrote:

Neem oil is the organic way. Its commonly used in hydroponic gardens. About 2 tablespoons mixed with a gallon of waterand sprayedc on the bottom of the leaves.
Formulations made of neem oil also find wide usage as a bio-pesticide for organic farming, as it repels a wide variety of pests including the mealy bug, beet armyworm, aphids, the cabbage worm, thrips, whiteflies, mites, fungus gnats, beetles, moth larvae, mushroom flies, leafminers, caterpillers, locust, nematodes and the Japanese beetle. Neem oil is not known to be harmful to mammals, birds, earthworms or some beneficial insects such as butterflies, honeybees and ladybugs. It can be used as a household pesticide for ant, bedbug, cockroach, housefly, sand fly, snail, termite and mosquitoes both as repellent and larvicide (Puri 1999). Neem oil also controls black spot, powdery mildew, anthracnose and rust (fungus).
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Hmmm? Odd though. There have been any number of posters over the years that said Neem oil did nothing for their problems. I'm just recounting, mind you. Never had the occasion to use it myself.
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wrote:

I agree, Billy I spent a good bit of money several years ago for Neem oil. There were no noticeable results, pyrethrum on the other hand nailed the little buggers. Steve
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