Compost ingredients?

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TomC wrote:

The rendering plant?
Best regards, Bob
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Andrew McMichael wrote:

Before the day is long gone, you'll get a lot of different answers. Mine is that, if you have the carbon to go with it and a deep enough pit, you can compost an elephant.
The answer to your question changes dramatically based on what sort of compost process you have in mind. If you are going to be attentive and ensure a "hot process" pile, you can chuck just about anything that comes to hand into the pile. Vermin and pets are not an issue with a pile that is cooking along at 135 degrees or better or that is enclosed in a composter such as the rotating models now available. Nor are they a problem with pit composting or any of a half-dozen variants on the theme of composting. On the other hand, builders of 'slow process' compost piles need to show greater restraint and avoid not only meat scraps but also pet and human manures of all sorts.
Here's a link to a pretty exhaustive treatment of the topic.
http://www.jenkinspublishing.com/humanure.html
Bill
--
Zone 5b (Detroit, MI)
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On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 20:13:21 -0400, Noydb

manure for fertilizing and seeing several Americans struck with Hepatitis I am totally against using dog or human manure anywhere near my edible plants!
Have also read in several places that cooked meat, bones, and human/pet manure should not be included in compost materials.
Lee
JMTCW
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wrote:

products. For some of us organic meat is an oxymoron.... I don't mean to demean anyone that eats or uses animal products, just happen to believe in "Diet for a Small Planet".
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Well, now there's an interesting concept. I don't use any animal products in my compost. I just use grass trimmings, leaves and rotting hay. Not exactly tasty stuff but it serves the purpose for me. My plants also seem to like it.

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On 31 Jul 2003 19:19:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Lee Hall) wrote:

let the leaves create a natural mulch under the parent tree and I've no hay. :>)
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Thats because your confusing/intertwining two separate concepts. Organic farming (which favors renewable resources and recycling, returning to the soil the nutrients found in waste products) and vegetarianism.
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On Fri, 01 Aug 2003 15:51:35 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote:

Thanks Jan, very interesting! We continue to buy organic beef when we entertain and you've succeeded in convincing us to continue for our unenlightened friends. :>)
We'll have to agree to disagree personally, but I respect your informed choice.
namaste, tomj
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On Sun, 03 Aug 2003 02:09:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote:

She's not a vegetarian then, she's someone who doesn't eat meat, but does eat fish.
Vegetarian, by definition, means someone who doesn't eat red meat, doesn't eat poultry, and doesn't eat seafood - in short, a vegetarian doesn't eat any dead animals.
What's 'NBD'? I can't figure that out.
Pat
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What about live animals? <G>
(Sorry Pat couldn't resist...)
Mike
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The veggies I've talked to say that there are lots of kinds. Vegans won't eat eggs, they drink soy milk, and don't eat any flesh. Around here, there are lots of folks who won't eat "anything with a face." They'll eat seafood though. I say eat whatever you want and be happy.
NBD = no big deal.
Jan
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Eggs don't have faces, neither does milk. However seafood does. These people need to make up their minds. roz az usa
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wrote:

It's simple - the generally accepted definitions go like this:
vegetarian - eats no dead animals (this is the simplest way to express it), many eat both eggs and milk, some eat one but not the other [1].
vegan - eats no dead animals and no animal products either (no eggs, no dairy foods, usually no honey) Many vegans also do not use leather, or other similar animal-based products. [2].
It's somewhat irritating to vegetarians when those who eat seafood or chicken (for instance) call themselves 'vegetarians' because this creates confusion.
You go to a restaurant and ask the waiter if a certain entree is 'vegetarian'. He says it is, because the last person who discussed it with him claimed to be a vegetarian but wasn't disturbed by the chicken stock used in the recipe...so you think it's OK for you (a vegetarian) and you order it
[1] From Merriam Webster online (for the definition of a vegetarian they say 'one who practices vegetarianism'):
Main Entry: vegetarianism Pronunciation: -E-&-"ni-z&m Function: noun Date: circa 1851 : the theory or practice of living on a diet made up of vegetables , fruits, grains, nuts, and sometimes eggs or dairy products
[2] From Merriam-Webster online:
Main Entry: vegan Pronunciation: 'vE-g&n also 'vA- also 've-j&n or -"jan Function: noun Etymology: by contraction from vegetarian Date: 1944 : a strict vegetarian who consumes no animal food or dairy products; also : one who abstains from using animal products (as leather)
Pat (not a vegetarian at the moment, but have been one in the past and likely will be again in the future)
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Yep, it does cause confusion. I know a lot of folks who don't eat red meat, but eat seafood & poultry and call themselves vegetarians. I have a cousin who is a vegan, who always looks too thin & puny.
It's hard in Alaska to be able to afford a totally veggie diet, because veggies are *so* expensive up here. A cucumber is $1.49 at the market. A peach is $1.50. An organic cuke at the Farmer's Market can cost you $3. (We can't grow peaches here.) An artichoke is normally $3. OTOH, 10# of Alaska-grown spuds is $2.99 and 5# of Alaska-grown carrots is $2.99. We can grow root crops and brassicas up here like crazy, but can't grow hot weather crops commercially and sell them cheaply. Hothouse 'maters up here are $4/lb all year long. I don't know what the organic 'maters cost at the Farmers Market. Rice & beans are cheap up here, by the 50 or 100# sacks, but you need a balanced diet and greens are just flat expensive in the north. Lots of us forage for greens and mushrooms, but we have 7 months of snow here, so the foraging season is limited.
I don't think of tofu as "food," but you probably do. Someone gave me a soyburger once without telling me what it was. I commented on it tasting funny. She spat, "It's soy, what's wrong with it??" I said, "It ain't bad, but I'm a beef cattle rancher." She inspected her shoes, until her face quit being red.

I've never been a vegetarian, per se, but at times have quit eating meat because I was too poor to buy meat (going to college) or for health reasons, when I had to take the heavy protein load off my system. I feel better when I limit my meat intake. Pop lives on meat and spuds. I'm able to juggle our menu so he gets lots of meat and I get big salads and some meat, and we're both happy.
Tofu sucks, IMO. Big salads, OTOH, rock, especially when they come out of your own garden : ) And, IMO, broccali is a food group. I just love it, so I have 8 broccali plants in my garden. (I'm misspelling it, huh? *laugh*)
Jan
PS: Since this thread started with compost, I have to report that the compost pile I started at about the same time we started this thread -- well, it's done. It got hot; it cooked along; I turned it last night and it's done. I found a good website for any northern gardeners who don't think they can make good, hot compost, written by a gal down on Kodiak Island, Alaska. (150 miles south of me.) Also looked at the Compost Calculator website and got my C:: N ratio pretty close. That's probably what did the trick. That's a *very* cool website.
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On Tue, 05 Aug 2003 01:47:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote:

I do indeed think of tofu as food.
I'll bet you'd think of it as food too if you tried my recipes for tofu-chocolate mousse or tofu-chocolate pie. Or pumpkin-tofu cheesecake.
I also like frozen tofu cutlets: the tofu is frozen and thawed (totally changing its texture), then breaded and baked or fried, and served with a sauce (usually pasta sauce in our house).
I'd be happy to email them to you. If you want them, let me know.

I can almost live on big salads throughout the summer!
Pat
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On Tue, 05 Aug 2003 01:47:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote:

LOL i top 250!!! hardly sickly...
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Good Lord -- you're a full-sized fellow! Do you eat cheese, milk, eggs and everything but, what, red meat, poultry and fish? I think I need to get some recipes from you, Tom.
One of the local ranching families is famous for big men. When the long, lost brother was coming home to work for us at the Soil & Water Conservation District here, his older brother said, "Yeah, it's a shame. He never did come into his full weight." (The long, lost brother weighs a whisker under 200 lbs. His brothers are all far closer to 300, but they're still hard-working men. They're just big & tall guys. Their mom just turned 80. She's still running the ranch and putting her hay up this week. She's 5'6" and 130 lbs. and _none_ of her sons mess with her. She's awesome. *g* She sold the cattle and runs wapati now.)
Jan
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On Fri, 08 Aug 2003 05:28:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@xyz.net (Jan Flora) wrote:

on it....for now it's live food only!
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I could relate to the difficulty of eating vegetarian in Alaska. It was even worse when I was there in the 1970s; there was no farmer's market and hardly anybody was a vegetarian. When I moved down the Coast to Oregon (I later settled in the Seattle area), I was overwhelmed by the bounty of good produce. When I was going to the U of O, there were FREE plums, apples, tomatoes, etc., from people's gardens--they would just put them out on the curb, or put up a sign saying, "Please pick the plums." I loved it!

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I find a lot of hypocrisy with the vegetarians. My friend won't eat eggs, but she eats cheese. She won't eat meat but she sure wears leather! She is hindu and supposedly devout, but she had an exterminator kill all the moles in her yard. I could go on and on, and I bet a lot of you could, too. roz
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