Basil

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18712879?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSyst em2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_SingleItemSupl.Pubmed_Disco very_RA&linkpos=3&log$=relatedarticles&logdbfrom=pubmed
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Sep 24;56(18):8685-91. Epub 2008 Aug 20. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on the phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.). Nguyen PM, Niemeyer ED. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Southwestern University, 1001 East University Avenue, Georgetown, Texas 78626, USA. Many herbs and spices have been shown to contain high levels of polyphenolic compounds with potent antioxidant properties. In the present study, we explore how nutrient availability, specifically nitrogen fertilization, affects the production of polyphenolic compounds in three cultivars (Dark Opal, Genovese, and Sweet Thai) of the culinary herb, basil ( Ocimum basilicum L.). Nitrogen fertilization was found to have a significant effect on total phenolic levels in Dark Opal ( p < 0.001) and Genovese ( p < 0.001) basil with statistically higher phenolic contents observed when nutrient availability was limited at the lowest (0.1 mM) applied nitrogen treatment. Similarly, basil treated at the lowest nitrogen fertilization level generally contained significantly higher rosmarinic ( p = 0.001) and caffeic ( p = 0.001) acid concentrations than basil treated at other nitrogen levels. Nitrogen fertilization also affected antioxidant activity ( p = 0.002) with basil treated at the highest applied nitrogen level, 5.0 mM, exhibiting lower antioxidant activity than all other nitrogen treatments. The anthocyanin content of Dark Opal basil was not affected by applied nitrogen level, but anthocyanin concentrations were significantly impacted by growing season ( p = 0.001). Basil cultivar was also determined to have a statistically significant effect on total phenolic levels, rosmarinic and caffeic acid concentrations, and antioxidant activities. PMID: 18712879 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Fish emulsion every 2 weeks, huh? Uh-huh.

And then there is last years discussion about chitosan. Anyone try it?
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I read this to suggest a plants growth provides a certain amount of nutrients and acceleration of physical growth may not coincide with nutrient growth. Small is beautiful comes to mind perhaps slow is too. Musing. Excess N and we get leggy plants perhaps the value of food goes down. Wild gathering and nutrition comes to mind too. Not what we eat but what we eat eats is worth pondering and does it pertain to all life forms like vegetables and fungi ?
About 90 F right now las year April 26 of 91 was the years high.
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Bill Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


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I think your right. I've noticed that when I buy basil in the market, it doesn't have the same intensity of flavor as when I grow it, which is one of the reasons that I grow them. I think that this is true of all commercial produce. Grown too quickly, they lack those essentials that give them flavor. Home grown lettuce, has more flavor as well. Not that it is just fresher, but has more schmeck.
From the first article I'll hold back on the nitrogen to the basil, but I'm still intrigued by the chitosan.
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