All my edible's are dying

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Evening Ladies and Gent's
This year I have dicided to get myself a greenhouse and grow som tomatoe's etc...
Everything is working great untill the plants started fruiting, I go some nice tomatoes comming thru. I have started to know little blac speckles forming on the bottom of my tomatoes, and then they ar turning bad and mushy, Can anyone suggest something for me to try?
Also my Pumpin's,marrow's and butternut squash had nice big flowers then the big flower heads are dying and snapping completly off th stalks,
any help on this matter would be great, this is really starting t annoy me, They all have lived and grew nicely in my greenhouse, for last fe months,
Regards Richar
-- Anything_exotic
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Sounds like a fungal problem. How humid is it in the greenhouse? Is it getting plenty of air flow?
--
Peace! Om

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wrote:

That would be a good chance but there may be more than one problem, hard to say without seeing.
Also how would the curcurbits get pollinated? Can bees get into the greenhouse? Are you doing it by hand?
David
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Anything_exotic said:

Could be blossom end rot, which is a problem of low calcium availability in the fruit.
(/quote from http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3117.html )
Blossom-end rot is induced when demand for calcium exceeds supply. This may result from low calcium levels or high amounts of competitive cations in the soil, drought stress, or excessive soil moisture fluctuations which reduce uptake and movement of calcium into the plant, or rapid, vegetative growth due to excessive nitrogen fertilization.
Management
1. Maintain the soil pH around 6.5. Liming will supply calcium and will increase the ratio of calcium ions to other competitive ions in the soil.
2. Use nitrate nitrogen as the fertilizer nitrogen source. Ammoniacal nitrogen may increase blossom-end rot as excess ammonium ions reduce calcium uptake. Avoid over-fertilization as side dressings during early fruiting, especially with ammoniacal forms of nitrogen.
3. Avoid drought stress and wide fluctuations in soil moisture by using mulches and/or irrigation. Plants generally need about one inch of moisture per week from rain or irrigation for proper growth and development.
4. Foliar applications of calcium, which are often advocated, are of little value because of poor absorption and movement to fruit where it is needed.
(end quote)

The first thing I would suspect is a lack of pollination. Do bees have access to the greenhouse? If not, then you will have to hand pollinate the squash.
They could also be suffering something like blossom end rot, or otherwise aborting fruit due to nutrient or temperature stress. How hot does it get in the greenhouse during the day?
(Hope I have caught all the typos, as I have injured some fingers on my left hand, and I touch type...)
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

After enlightenment, the laundry.
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I'm replying to this post with my tomato problem since I'm getting an error message trying to post a new message!
Two of my tomato plants suddenly went into total wilt. I've never seen this type of wilting problem. Last year in a different spot I had some wilting disease that started at the bottom of the plant and they responded a bit to extra watering, for a while, before they expired. These tomatoes are wilted top to bottom, no leaf discoloring. I'd appreciate any help identifying this problem and either a cure or future prevention. This is only the second year of planting tomatoes in this area and so far the other plants near these two affected ones are doing fine. I'm getting a lot of strange things going on in the garden this year - plants that don't look healthy, black spotting on a brand new, expensive hydrangea and almost overnight major increase in black spotting on all my roses, other perennials that just don't look right etc. I'm an organic gardener, so any help in that direction would be most appreciated.
Thanks! June
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In article <9c9900f6-d4de-47ed-b590-6530d4505eb8

With regards to the tomatoes, that sounds like an insect or insect borne disease. My wife, who walked in and out of the room just now said "...probably insect, just for the speed of it." and, "What does total wilt look like?"
Rodale's Color Handbook of Garden Insects lists potato stalk borer, potato tuberworm, cutworms and crickets as affecting stems and branches (and by implication, the whole system depending on where they are in or on the plant.)
The rest seems environmental.
Where are you?
What kind of rains are you getting?
How overcast has it been?
What temperatures have you been getting? What kind of humidity?
How much air can get in around the affected plants?
How much air can you get in around the affected plants?
And responding to your comment about strange things.
I think we're past the point where we can expect things to behave normally. --I've been observing particularly heavy fruit and seedset on trees and weeds these past few years, as if the plant kingdom knows something we don't.
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When I said total wilt I meant that plant leaves are wilted top to bottom. Some wilting diseases will only show wilt starting at the base and working up and that's gradual and in the beginning responds a bit to watering. The one thing I haven't checked for is cut worm damage, because I always put sticks around the stem to prevent that, and I also have them mulched in a cone shape, so it didn't seem like that would be the problem. I haver over 20 tomatoes planted and only those two next to each other are showing this problem. There are many more next to them in the same row and one row beneath as well as other areas of the garden and they're not showing this problem. I looked up tomato diseases on the Internet but couldn't find any pictures of a plant with this total wilting which came on within about 24 hours. I will check them out later to see if somehow a cut worm got them. At this point, I hope it's that instead of some other disease that might get the rest of them! We haven't have a lot of rain this season; but we haven't had drought either. We probably get a good rain once a week or so and none of the tomatoes, which I planted early, have shown any sign of lack of water. It's probably been hotter than normal for these western NC mountains - lots of mid and high 80''s days, even a couple of 90 degree days the past two weeks.
Regards, June
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In article <83da50b4-d4f4-4547-92f8-
On a wild thought, chemical attack?
Could some animal have peed on them?

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says...

Around here all such animals are in Parliament. Any of them been to visit?
David
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ROTFL
Not yet, We keep those animals in Ottawa much of the year.
They'll be on the barbeque/garden circuit sometime in the next week or so.
I don't know about NC though.
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I checked those wilted tomatoes and there's no cut worm damage. It can't be chemical attack because I don't use chemicals and our house is in the middle of 11 acres with nothing near us that could do that. The tomatoes are in cages and growing in stone terraces that are not accessible to critters. One of the wilted tomatoes is a Big boy and the other one is Whopper. The heirlooms like Brandywine which are right next to them, so far are fine. I think there may be some kind of pathogen in the soil since I'm not having, nor have had any problems in any other areas, other than the terraces; and a lot of the extra soil in those terraces was brought in two years ago when the terraces were built. My plan is, in the fall when the current crops are harvested and the plant are pulled out, to wet down those areas and put down clear plastic and leave it down for several weeks and hope the heat will kill whatever it is in the soil that was causing these wilting diseases.
Regards, June
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wrote:

Possibly some sort of tunneling animal? I have one that is doing the same thing. I haven't pulled it up yet to see what is going on. I need to do that soon.
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Do you water with a hose? Is it possible the tomatoes got the first blast from a hose-full of water that had been sitting in the sun? That can easily get hot enough to wilt/kill plants, even when the weather is mild.
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In article

You must know that that sounds too easy. If you have wilt, fungal or bacterial, it is there to stay for awhile, like a decade. If it is fungal you might be able to to grow resistant tomatoes.
www.utextension.utk.edu/publications/spfiles/sp370-C.pdf www.avrdc.org/pdf/tomato/bacterial_wilt.pdf www.avrdc.org/pdf/tomato/fusarium.pdf
In the meantime, you may consider crop rotation.
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In article

When I had fungal root rot along my fence line in my English Ivy, the local nursery sold me some soil sulphur, and some soil probiotics. Instructions were to scatter the sulphur and water it in to kill the fungus, then wait two weeks and water in the soil bacteria.
It worked.
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Peace! Om

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If you read the PDFs from the Ag Extensions, you'll notice that nothing was said about soil sulphur, and probiotics. I presume that you took in a sample that was identified as fungal root rot. I'm glad it worked for you. How much did the treatment cost and how much surface area did you treat? What do you think of the OP's intention to solarize her soil in order to kill off her pest? I hope the yarrow tea helped.
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I took in a limp dying branch... So, yes more or less.

It was cheap. Under $20.00 and I treated about a 150 ft. fence line about 1 ft. on either side of the fence. I took advice and products from Gardenville. They are located about 5 blocks away.

Could not hurt. The sun is a universal disinfectant. Theoretically, running water (as in streams) running under sunlight for 1 mile will help purify water.
The fact that sulphur treatment kills fungus has come in handy for more than just soil. Garlic is useful for female yeast infections as well. Better than some of the OTC crap they sell for that that does not work. Garlic is VERY high in sulphur.
Makes me wonder if a heavy garlic treatment for fungal root rot might work.

Yarrow is good for colds. :-)
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I hear cranberry juice (not punch) is best. ta sant
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No, that's for urinary tract infections, not yeast infections...
I add cranberry juice to cocktails just because I like it. :-)
Yogurt and vinegar douche is the old remedy for Yeast, but garlic works better. I've not been bothered by it for awhile but last time I did, pigging out on garlic actually worked. I also recommended it to my best friend last time she had a problem with it and donated 10 heads of garlic to the cause. Fortunately, she _likes_ garlic! It worked for her as well.
Eaten in recipes, NOT made into a douche.
Pardon for the semi-off-topic post, but one can grow garlic too. <g> Like other foods, it's very medicinal.
Medicinal garden foods might make an interesting thread... I have trouble growing garlic. I'm probably not doing it right. Never been able to get it to "clove" for me, but onions did ok. They seem to like sandier soil. But, with the cost of water here, it's cheaper for me anymore to purchase most veggies instead of trying to grow them. :-(
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Peace! Om

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Hey Om -- go look at: http://www.filareefarm.com/
Since you're down there in hot, old Texas, you need to grow garlic varieties that will thrive in your climate. The Filaree website explains the different types of garlic and which ones do well down south.
There's at least one big, commercial seed garlic seller in Texas. You can probably find them on google.
Jan
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