Stripping wallpaper


Any body know the best way to penetrate three layers of vynyl emulsion to enable me to strip woodship off the wall, without spending weeks, or damaging the plaster?
Cheers Brian :o)
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A steam stripper, making sure that the steam is applied for long enough so that paper is thoroughly saturated with moisture to dissolve the old wallpaper paste, but not too long because extreme heat can damage the plaster. Emulsion paint isn't water-proof so the steam will penetrate the woodchip.
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Thanks Phil
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The trick is to get some moisture into the paper, which takes time. Once this has happened, the steamer will then boil that moisture and blow the paper off the wall effortlessly. I suggest going over the wall with a steam stripper initially without even trying to take any paper off. Leave it a couple of hours to soak through, and then go over it again. You may even find you can pull whole sheets off in one piece without tearing at that point as the steamer reboils the original water which has now soaked into the paper.
You can get a tool to cut through the paint to let water through to the paper, but I don't recommend this. It can damage the plaster behind, and it cuts the paper into small pieces which makes it more tedious to take off. Only if you have layers of waterproof paint would something like this be necessary.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 06:02:54 GMT, "~Brian~"

When I moved into my present property it was a nightmare as every room had bloody woodchip which had layer after layer of paint slapped on!
After literally hours of steaming & scraping I came up with an idea of making a long handled scraper. By just adapting an ordinary scraper & adding about an 18" length of broom handle it made things ten times easier. I sharpened the edge of the scraper & this served to literally scour & shave the woodchip off, thus allowing the steam to penetrate more easily.
Don.
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Don Spumey wrote:

I have a cheep plastic device i got from B&Q years ago. Under the grip are three wheels with short bunt spikes, they don't damage the wall but will penetrate the surface of the paper enough to help the steam do it's job. I beleive they are available still.
Mike
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Don Spumey wrote:

WTF is putting a scraper on a broom pole able to help in removing wallpaper?
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 09:01:09 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"

As daft as it might sound it works. The same principle as using a long handled screwdriver on a tight screw it exerts more focal force using the same pressure!
Don.
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Don Spumey wrote:

No its not,in this case More pressure on a short blade,less pressure on a long blade.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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"Don Spumey" wrote:

I have an 18inch flat-blade screwdriver that has the same size blade and handle as screwdrivers half the length but which easily turns screws that the shorter screwdrivers can't budge. It has never failed to turn a screw that still had a slot left on its head, and the only difference between it and my shorter screwdrivers is the length from the blade tip to the end of the handle.
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Phil Anthropist wrote:

The lenghth of the scredrivershaft should make no difference whatsoever as the force os rotational. The size/type of the grip would make a lot of difference to the amount of force you could exert. Looking at my scrwdrivers the longer they are the bigger the grip.
There's a double entenre there for someone.
Mike
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On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 11:57:55 +0100, "Phil Anthropist"

I think it has a lot to do with being able to apply more torque using a longer handled screwdiver.
Don.
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On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 12:12:55 GMT, "Vodkajelly"

Yes & no. It can by virtue of it having a larger handle!
Quote:
Continuous Levers: Screwdrivers
A screwdriver is actually a form of lever where a handle with a large radius provides a mechanical advantage in turning a blade with a smaller radius.
Measure the radius of the handle on a screwdriver and then measure the radius of the blade. Calculate the mechanical advantage from de/dr.
Note that the mechanical advantage to a circular device is de/dr while the mech. adv. for a lever was Fr/Fe. Note that the seeming "flip-flop" of the fraction is not a mistake.
Consider that Fe de = Fr dr. Cross dividing by Fe and dr yields: de = Fr -- -- = mechanical advantage dr Fe
http://www.comfsm.fm/~dleeling//physics/torque.html
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Don Spumey wrote:

One would then have two hands doing the work instead of one, making it less tiring :-)

It can't exert more force merely by being longer :-) I'm still right :-) Don said long handled he didn't say anything about it being a bigger handle than on the shorter screwdriver :-)
If you had said, "You're right there, but if would if it had a larger handle", I wouldn't have needed to reply :-)
Anyway back to the important stuff now ;-)

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Thank you all for the suggestions, most helpful!
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to
You need time for water to penetrate through to the paper. Water alone will largely run down the paper leaving a thin film to evaporate. However if you use a wallpaper paste mix, the 'wet' will cling to the paper allowing the time for the water to soak through. Then the long handled scraper will make 'lighter' work of it with a steamer. Allow quite a long time for the paste to soak (maybe 30 mins to 1 hr). Hope this helps
P (Founder member of the 'I hate woodchip society)

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