Is cavity wall insulation worth it?


My neighbour had it done with a British Gas offer.... wondered whether anyone had any experience to pass on... and also whether anyone views the cost to pay back in a decent period on reduced heating bills?
We recently moved into a 70s built house (6 bedrooms!) and on the few cold days we have had so far since moving, it feels a cold house already....
I am also considering the other things like new windows and loft insulation, which the house also needs.
Thanks, Nick.
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Assuming that you haven't got the heating on at the moment, you are just feeling the ambient temperature. Cavity or any other insulation won't automatically warm the house. It just stops heat that's already there from passing through the walls.
Rob Graham
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"Nick Dawson" wrote:

I have had CW insulation put in the two homes we have owned and have just had it installed in our present home, a 1900 semi-detached house, and noticed an immediate difference in both properties. The indoor temperature hasn't dropped below 20 degrees this last week even though on some nights it has been 13 degrees outside (we haven't had any heating on). The cost of CW is paid back in one to two years according to http://www.est.org.uk/myhome/insulation/ . The cost of sealed-unit double glazing and new window and door frames is such that it takes much longer to pay back, but how do you cost greater security, no draughts, sound-proofing, no painting and a much smarter looking property? Loft insulation is now recommended at 10 inches thickness which is OK if you don't use your loft for storage.
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On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 08:09:21 +0100, "Phil Anthropist"

It's the most productive insulation you could have after loft. The difference was remarkable in our 70's house
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wrote:

It was also very effective when installed in my previous (1930s) house. An extra effect was that it totally removed the draughts in the floor space. This current house also needs CW insulation but I have a problem here as the previous owner had plastic cladding over the upper parts of the outer brick walls and I have yet to find an installer who can handle this. The cladding keeps the rain water off the brick walls but does little for the thermal insulation, though I suppose it reduces the effect of evaporative chilling in windy wet weather. Michael
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wrote:

I have a different problem about cavity wall insulation. I want it but because of health and saftey rules I can only get the front and back of my house done. The installation company that my energy supplier uses to do the job will not insulate my gable end because it is too dangerous because I have a garage and they cannot climb on the roof. Also they will not do it from the inside as they say it can only be done from the outside. I have phoned my energy suppllier twice about this, each time they said they would be in touch. They have not. I would change energy suppliers but they are 200 cheaper than the next company. Here is a picture of the roof they cannot climb on.
http://i4.tinypic.com/27wrs3r.jpg
I am just waiting for the company to turn up to do the job then tell them if they cannot do the 3 walls then I am cancelling it and if they want paying for it this is going to hit all the newspapers and watchdog and rogue traders and everyone else I can think of.
Mark
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What's wrong with using scaffolding or a cherry-picker? Not enough profit?
--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
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"Michael Shergold" wrote:

I recently read of one person who had standard brick walls but for some reason didn't want them drilled. The CW insulation company drilled into the cavity through the inside walls and blew the insulation in from the inside. They don't need to be able to see the mortar joints - they often drill through rendered outside walls. Otherwise, can a section of cladding be removed at one metre intervals to allow access to the wall, then the cladding replaced?
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The cladding is like tongued and grooved and not easy to remove except when starting from either the top or bottom. I had to have some cladding replaced on one side after a storm in about 2002. I also have the problem of an attached garage though the cladders then managed to work on it's roof with only extra boarding and ladders. I am surprised some company has not developed small plastic white 'mushrooms' so that you can bore through the cladding and plug it afterwards with a mushroom. If the holes were made at regular intervals it would not look too unsightly. Michael
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"Michael Shergold" wrote:

They would still want to repair the hole drilled in the wall, and that might be difficult through a small hole cut in the cladding.
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"Phil Anthropist" wrote:

Should be holes.
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It will not be a small hole - about 25mm
PhilC
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I suppose that is what is meant by a "stud wall" ;-)
--

Graham.

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Certainly one of the best insulation steps I have ever taken. Not expensive but a definite benefit. What you should remember is that CWI does not make the house any warmer - it simply requires less energy to keep it at your comfort level!
You will find that your central heating will stay off for far longer after you have had CWI installed because the house retains the existing heat for far longer. We often find now that even on very cold days, the radiators will become completely cold before the thermostat senses the drop in room temperature and the heating kicks in again.
Go for it!
Kev
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