What is the layout order of starting three tab shingles rows?

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What is the layout order of starting three tab shingles rows?
With the standard 3 foot three tab shingles what is the best order of courses to stager the joints? After the starter course I use a full three tab shingles. Then cut 6 inches off the end tab of the next course. At this point is where I am not sure what to do. Do I cut a full tab off for the number three course? And use a two full tab section. Then go to a cut down t 6 inch and a full tab for number 4 course. And then repeat? At course five to 8 and so on?
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I have seen where they cut 6" off and I have also seen where they cut 8" and then the next row 4". I think its up to you how you want it to look. I am sure that you will get more replies on this subject.
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That's the approach I use.
Start with a full shingle, cut off 4" on the next row, cut off 8" on the next row, then start over with a full shingle on the next row.
This gives a slightly less formal "rustic" appearance, but more importantly, it's better at hiding slight alignment errors between rows (vertical joints only line up every 3 rows instead of every other row).
Anthony
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I always measure the entire roof first, just make sure you wont end up with a little sliver of a tab on the other end. other than that, 1/2 tab/ full tab... repeat
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Instructions for layout for shingles are printed on the plastic wrap they come in. Doing something else voids the warranty.
--
Dave

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The warranty is completely worthless anyway. Ever see an application where every nail hit the tar strip? won't happen with nail guns & roofers knocking out 10 square a day.
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nails aren't supposed to hit the tar strip anyway. The tar strip is for sealing the tabs above to the shingle below. I actually got spanked once for having nails in the tar strip. But your point is right. the warranty is worthless. Unless it's some sort of a class action for a defective batch of shingles, shingle companies just blame the installer.
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longshot wrote:

I hope the nails don't hit the tar strip as that isn't proper technique.
Matt
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And your assessment of the warranty be worthless is based on what?
Roofers generally ignore the instructions on the shingle package anyway. They go straight up the roof (no pyramid), then work left and right. At least the faster roofing subs do. Yes, the warranty is void here. Has nothing to do with one individual laying shingles on his own roof.
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Dave

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The warranty covers material defects. That's it. (Unless you purchase the "Golden Pledge" coverage from GAF.) So I guess it's not worthless--those shingles might be defective, and you might get to join one of those class actions that you see advertised. But if you think that if you follow every instruction on a shingle package and if your roof leaks, the shingle manufacturer is going to come and make it right, you're dreaming.
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Guess I dreamed the composition shingle application on the detached garage I built. Every detail followed. Wasn't that difficult, or time-consuming.
Why a class action suit on a warranty defect? Mountain out of mole-hill. Sounds like hearsay and suppostion to me.
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Dave

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On Ap

So you've done one roof and have decided that you know better than most roofers? Roofers run shingles straight up because it is faster, and time is money in construction.

Believe what you want. When I hear of just ONE roof repaired by the manufacturer, I'll consider changing my mind.
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marson wrote:

If they run them straight up, then all of the shingle seams will be exactly aligned and the roof will leak like a sieve.
Matt
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course you realize they alternate 6" back and forth.
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marson wrote:

Well, that isn't "straight", but doing this requires you to slide shingles between two other shingles for the next "straight up" column and that certainly can't be fast and risks damaging the shingle.
Matt
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"If they run them straight up, then all of the shingle seams will be

Grasshopper ...... there is much to learn
kickstart
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try it, you'll like it.
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marson wrote:

No, I like doing things right.
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And why would your way be better? Please explain your reasoning. Don't give me the line about it being on the shingle wrapper, because Owen Corning's instructions show "vertical racking" as the proper method, (Perhaps they are a bit more up on the way the vast majority of roofs are laid down in this country) In fact, they recommend against running shingles across and diagonally. http://www.owenscorning.com/around/roofing/pdfs/Berkshire_Install.pdf
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says...

Well, I read those directions and it does say to NOT run the shingles across and diagonally up but there are no reasons given. Can anyone give me a reason why those shingles should not be run across?
Mike
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