Water Tank Question

I have an existing water tank with a pump inside that fills the tank, and pressurizes the system. I am putting another tank side by side to "gravity feed" an area down below my property. I was wondering how I should fill the 2nd tank inorder to use it for the gravity feed situation, as well as a secondary backup to my home. The one main tank is all complete and fills automatically, and when there is a demand, it pumps the water to the house and or garden. Now with the new tank, I need to keep this full, and be able to use it in tandem as well as for the lower property via gravity feed. I wanted to know a simple solution to installing a plumbing pipe and or how to make both tanks one.....? thank you,' john
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wrote:

I don't know about adding a second tank but I would think at all you would need to do is connect the two and let the pump fill both of them. When I was faced with a similar situation, I just changed out the original tank to one 3 times larger and that solved my problem.
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Yes, fill both tanks, no problem. Making both tanks serve as one is the problem for water use? How do I put both tanks in tandem? I know the simple solution is to put a pipe between the main tank, and the new tank at the bottom so both fill. I was hoping I did not have to tap into the bottom of the original tank. john
"Independent old cuss" wrote in message
wrote:

I don't know about adding a second tank but I would think at all you would need to do is connect the two and let the pump fill both of them. When I was faced with a similar situation, I just changed out the original tank to one 3 times larger and that solved my problem.
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I'm just guessing here but I would think that if you tapped into the original inlet on the slave tank, the pressure from the pump that fills the first tank would push the water to the slave tank when the main tank is full. Worse case would seem to be that you might have to have a larger pump. The cost of that might make you start thinking about just replacing the original tank
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You need too One Way
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http://hot-text.ath.cx/~bd~/d/oneway-valve.gif
A check valve, clack valve, non-return valve or one-way valve is a mechanical device, a valve, which normally allows fluid (liquid) to flow through it in only one direction.
In the gravity feed tank, you need a low water level sensor alarm too!
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By simply connecting the two tanks they will act as one, if you install a check valve tank #2 will not back feed into the system. You will not need a larger pump, it will just run a bit longer to fill both tanks. The only reason to install level control in tank #2 would be if the tank is open to the atmosphere like a municipal water tower or elevated farm tank. If that's the case, a simple float operated valve similar to a toilet fill valve will do the job.
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Hi Tom, I have a large pump in the well that fills the main tank. It goes off when a level is reached in the main tank. So, I suppose I have to put in a line at the base of the main tank, and attach it to the base of the new tank. That way both will fill, and both will shut off when the level is met in the main tank. I then will be able to gravity feed to the lower property from the new secondary tank. I am not sure if I need a low water sensor in that tank. Since the entire system is always being supplied via the well, and the on and off when the level rises....? john
"Tom Cular" wrote in message

By simply connecting the two tanks they will act as one, if you install a check valve tank #2 will not back feed into the system. You will not need a larger pump, it will just run a bit longer to fill both tanks. The only reason to install level control in tank #2 would be if the tank is open to the atmosphere like a municipal water tower or elevated farm tank. If that's the case, a simple float operated valve similar to a toilet fill valve will do the job.
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The outlet of the main tank doesn't have to be at the bottom. It just has to be below the level at which the pump shuts off, so that the pump will run until both tanks are full. That should make installation a bit easier, you'll only have to drain the main tank a few inches below the pump shut off level.
Cheers, Wayne
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#2 would be if the tank is open to the atmosphere like a municipal water tower or elevated farm tank.
You will have to add:: Chlorination is the process of adding the element chlorine to water as a method of water purification to make it fit for human consumption as drinking water.
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Hello, Our tanks are open to the atmosphere and not a sealed unit. We do not chlorinate the water since it is artesian well water. We have had this main tank system since 1980 I am increasing the existing tank, with another 2500 gal. tank I think a tandem hookup will work. Although I preferred not going into the bottom of the existing tank to tie it to the other I may have to. I was hoping for some siphon arrangement...... oh well......that is a deep subject! john
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#2 would be if the tank is open to the atmosphere like a municipal water tower or elevated farm tank.
You will have to add:: Chlorination is the process of adding the element chlorine to water as a method of water purification to make it fit for human consumption as drinking water.
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municipal water tower or elevated farm tank is artesian well water, it just more Water that set can go bad and kill you.. But it's your life.......

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I think a simple low level connection using through wall/bulkhead fittings at each tank, with a valve in the line would be the most reliable. A siphon would work but there is the issue of filling and maintaining a full siphon pipe. With a level control in tank #1 there is no need to add one in tank #2 if they are close to the same elevation.
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Thanks Tom, You confirm my thoughts. The tanks are next to each other. I was hoping for a siphon arrangement...... And wondered how I could manage to keep it always full The tanks never empty completely so it could work? hummmm. john
"Tom Cular" wrote in message

I think a simple low level connection using through wall/bulkhead fittings at each tank, with a valve in the line would be the most reliable. A siphon would work but there is the issue of filling and maintaining a full siphon pipe. With a level control in tank #1 there is no need to add one in tank #2 if they are close to the same elevation.
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John, my only concern with the siphon arrangement would be filling and maintaining a full siphon pipe, if for some reason you lost the full pipe, it would be a pain to refill it and restore the siphon. I know it's a task to lower the water level in tank #1 in order to install the plumbing, but in the long run it's probably best. Please let me know how you make out.
Tom

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