REPOINTING USING LIME TO REPLACE PORTLAND MORTAR

I already read that it is a poor idea to repairt and repoint brick work originally built using lime mortar by using portland cement mortar, but my question and train of thought relates as to weither the converse true:
How can lime mortar be used to repair and repoint a building of red brick that was originally built using Portland Cement mortar?
(and in my insane mind as then perhaps the lime mortar would re-enforce the weakened portland mortar brick work thru some process)
Also the local store has reccomended bonding cement and ideas or doctoral theses????
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wrote:

Normally you don't want the mortar to be harder than the brick. This can cause the mortar to crack the face off the brick in cold weather or any extreme conditions. Do not use bonding cement. As for the reverse, lime mortar can be used but it is harder and you must have dry conditions for a few days after pointing. I am assuming you mean lime and sand only.
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Generally I have many issues to fix this house. It is located in Central Pa I moved in to protect and defend and need to bring it into shape by next winter while on a low budget though I have credit lines available
I have though of repointing and stuccoing with lath/metal/synthetics and then stucco with fiberglass added; I have thought of even expanding/enlarging the foundation to add additional brick work as a shell
Generally more coment on the therapeutic value of using lime mixs to repair the internal brick work generally what you wrote can be greatly expanded upon in greater detail.
but none the less thanks.

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I'm a DIYer and have done lots of work like this. I suggest you first look for a damp course, at the foot of the walls, of course. This could be a lead sheet, slates, felt, etc, depending on when the house was built, and is intended to keep water from seeping up the walls from the foundation. This damp course should go all the way around the house, and in most internal walls too, just above ground level usually. If there is one, look at the exterior plaster around the base of the wall. Normally there would be a break in it at the damp course and the upper part of the plaster would have a drip edge to drip off the water, that runs down the wall, on a line that is just below the damp course. I assume that you have deep frosts in winter which can wreak havoc with the plaster if it is soaked with water when the frost occurs.
The damp course also helps to keep the water out of the house. If you had no damp course the water would soak up the wall and evaporate into the inside of the house, making it an unhealthy place to live.
Generally with plastering, you have a weaker mix - less cement - as you approach the outside of the plaster layer. Typically, three coats of plaster are applied but sometimes there are only two - that's what the lowest bidder will use, unless you specify otherwise in a contract. If your bricks are clay, you need to have a weaker plaster mix - typically good clean sand with the right size granules, lime and Portland cement. If your bricks are concrete, you can apply a harder mix i.e. add some more cement lime and less lime.
I suggest you visit a local building materials supplier and find the most competent person available. If you provide a good description he (most likely) should be able to offer you advice about the plaster mix proportions for your area. They may also have pamplets that can help you in your work.
About repointing using lime, normally a mix of sand, lime and cement are used. You can also add a little glue (PVC, I believe) to the mix water and this will give better bonding in the cracks.Make sure that all loose material, especially organic stuff, soil, growing plants, etc, are removed from the cracks and they should be clean when you start. It is best to soak the cracks a few hours before to start pointing and be sure the crack surfaces have no surface water in them when you point. They should appear damp but not glistening.
Hope that helps a little.
RF

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