Electrical Wiring Q

Not even sure if it's OK to do and, of course, local codes prevail.
OK, so you need to run a 15A 14/2 line to a load. All you have is 14/3. In general, is it ok to use 14/3. Of course it's the same capacity but what is the right thing to do with the red wire?
I'm thinking:
- Snip it off at both ends right at the sheathing leaving and using the b/w/g as usual.
- Tape and mark as Not COnnected at both ends or something.
- I saw once where they took the red wire, bent it back to the sheathing and curled it around it. Maybe some universal wiring message.
I know this is not clean and pro to do but why not? I thought about it and said what if I were running cable to a ceiling fan on a wall switch. The fan has no light. If one were to think ahead they would run 3-wire so in the future addding a light kit or replacing the fan with one that has a light would make it easy to change the wall switch setup to control light & fan.
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Al Bundy wrote:

Andy writes: As long as you're fudging a little on the code anyway, I'd connect the red and black together, wrap it with tape so that only the black comes out, and then use the black and white as a normal 14/2. Nothing dangerous about this, except it violates "convention", but reduces the voltage drop a little. Obviously you would still use a 15A breaker.....
Peraonally, I don't see the point in completely wasting a perfectly good extra run of copper.....
I would welcome any comments or criticism on this, just in case I have overlooked something....
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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Neither do I. But when you're starting something, pull everything out and see you have no 14/2 but a shitload of 14/3...that you got for free anyway...it's time to git 'er done!
Thanks for the reply.
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I have done this many times. Your ceiling fan example is a prime example.
I ran 14/3 wires between the switch and ceiling light in all of our bedrooms. For now, I installed wire nuts on each end of the red wire. But if we decide to install a ceiling fan in the future, the wiring is there and ready to go. By the way, if you're planning ahead for this, remember to install a box rated to hold the weight of a ceiling fan, even if you're only installing lights right now. Also, make sure your boxes have enough capacity for the extra wire and nut.
I used 14/3 wires for our living room outlets. The red wire connects to a wall switch, so I can quickly and easily convert any outlet to a switched outlet by using the red wire instead of the black. For the rest of the outlets, the red wires simply get joined and capped with wire nuts.
I also used 12/3 wire recently when I only needed 12/2. I had already purchased 200' of 12/3, but needed one 15' run of 12/2. Rather than waste money and wire buying a separate roll of 12/2, I simply used the 12/3 and put wire nuts on each end of the red wire.
These were all been approved by our inspectors with no problems.
Anthony
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Yep. That's all I needed - 15 ft. Got 'er Done!
Thanks for the reply.
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The NEC does not prohibit the use of a 3 conductor cable instead of a 2 conductor cable. The spare conductor should be capped with a wirenut and identified on each end as spare. It does not create a hazzard or violate any codes I am aware of. Inspectors all over the country will approve such an installation as long as the conductor is rated for the load and the protection is sized properly.
Ben
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