cement pillar weight projections

I am considering a project which would require the use of cement pillars. What I need to know is a rough idea of how much weight a cement pillar would hold. The pillar will be circular with a six inch diameter and assume a height of 10 feet. Knowing that a rebar, or two, would improve the weight, by how much per rebar?
If you would like, consider a wall 20 feet long with pillars as described, one foot apart.
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Give me more info... Required by whom? Knowing that a rebar, or two, would improve the weight, by how much per

6" x 10' at this ratio it would have to be almost all steel covered by concrete....to hold anything remember its not just vertical load you have to consider its horizontal also. At the ratio you mentioned simply leaning upagainst this pillar would cause me fear.
If you would like, consider a wall 20 feet long with pillars as described,

Why? Let me know what you are trying to accomplish and I will advise.
richard wrote:

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Ok. Do you know what ICF is? One method I like is taking styrofoam blocks, building up a wall, as with bricks, with each block having holes in them. When finished stacking, concrete is poured into the cavities which then become the main support of the frame of the house. The prefabbed blocks are 12"x12"x48".
My idea is to eliminate the stacking. Take 2 sheets of plywood 4'x8', seperate them by 12". Add lumber between them for extra support and other purposes. Fill the crevices with expanding foam. A little more will go into this but what I'm after is what amount of weight each pillar will be capable of holding.
As these houses have already been built, I was wondering how many more layers of standard shingles could be applied outside of the typical 3 for a standard stick house.

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Just for fun, Rich, let's figure out what you're talking about. Are you trying to determine the load bearing capacity of a wall to see if the roof will hold more layers of shingles?
The three-layer shingle limit is not imposed because of weight. It's there because someone thought that at some point the fasteners would need to be too long to reach the deck. Someone decided three layers was the point, and everybody just copied. Now it's part of the building code that most places adopt.
But maybe your last paragraph isn't connected with the earlier ones. Are you trying to do something, or are you just trying to figure out something? -- (||) Nehmo (||) -----------------------------------------------------
richard wrote:

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Stacking polystyrene blocks is going to be a lot faster than making form work you need out of lumber.
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Im sorry i havent been back sooner. Rich, I still have no Idea what you are trying to accomplish. But Im positive this homemade form will FAIL, the forces generated by concrete would blow this thing apart in sconds. If you are trying to save money..as we all are do it somewhere else in the project. If you are trying to gain more opening options delay the project and re think the openings (doors, windows) you can always cut openings in to the walls at any time and it really is not that big of a deal. richard wrote:

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I cant speak specifically for concrete, but granite pillars that are 6x6 and 7 feet long are about 450 pounds. I have had these installed for mailbox posts. Extrapolating to 10 feet long would be close to 700 pounds.
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