Beam replacement question

Good afternoon.
I may need to replace a beam that supports a load running parallel to the beam (loadbearing wall on the floor above.) What is the technique to support the load under this circumstance? It's simple when the load runs perpendicular to the beam, but I can't visualize how to do it when the load runs parallel to the beam.
Thanks -Mark
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You really need to provide some more information to answer this one. I take it the beam is part of the floor system. How much weight? What is the span? What would happen if you just went and pulled the beam--certain collapse? Is this a completed structure or is it being framed? If walls above are sheathed and the structure isn't loaded with snow or whatever, you can be fairly casual about temporary bracing. But obviously you are going to have to use some judgement. If there is a layer of plywood between the beam and the wall, you might be able to wedge in a number of 2x's in pairs that run at opposing angles down to the floor below. You could toenail them to the plywood just shy of the existing beam. But send us a pic if you really want any useful advice.
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Old house (1930). Beam span is 14'. Current beam is a doubled 2x10 joist and exhibits some sagging.Walls above are plastered. Removing the beam would result in extensive damage and possible collapse, as the wall above the beam carries second floor load.

There is shiplap subflooring between the beam and the wall above. Perhaps this could carry the shear load temporarily if I were to support the subfloor on either side of the beam during replacement?
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If the existing is not rotted or hurt, how about reinforcing it without removing it? It would be fairly straight forward to take out the sag with proper jacking. It might need to be done slowly over time to prevent cracking. You could sister the flanking joists on each side and cross block between them as you shore and remove the existing.
Sister the existing beam with steel plate, glued plywood, additional 2x10, or a combination of reinforcement
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Sistering the existing beam in place could be a solution. I suppose if I could get an engineer to specify the procedure and sign off on it, I could go that route.
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Go to a lumberyard and ask them. Companies that sell engineered wood products such as Microllams employ engineers who can do the design for you free of charge.
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Its a matter of terminology, but I'd call that a doubled joist rather than a beam. I'm with DanG on this one--jack it straight if you can and sister on some additional wood--perhaps a 9 1/2 LVL on either side. My other thought is that if has sagged in the distant past and does not seem to be moving, can things be shimmed to make them appear flat? I do think my original idea would work, but it would be a lot of work, and you would have to have something solid to drop your temporary supports to. Good luck.
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on 9/15/2007 12:00 PM Mark G. said the following:

Is there anyway to add sister 2 x 10s on either side of the beam? Perhaps by using a jack, or adjustable lally column, on the center of the existing beam and removing some of the sag ( 1/8" a day, over a period of time, allowing the wall above to adjust), you could add the sister 2 x 10s (or 2 x 12s if you can afford the 2" loss of headroom). If possible and having drilling room, use 8" lag bolts, washers and nuts, through the center of the beam and sisters, every foot or so. You may, or may not, have to support the ends of the new beam. A 2 x 8 flush against the wall under the ends will suffice.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

Don't forget to *stagger* those bolts to prevent splitting.
You

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Mark G. wrote:

This is one of those questions that might require the advice of a professional. I could look at it and tell you how to do it safely. Problem is, I can't look at it from here.
Here are a few methods that are used in those situations, but you may need someone who knows what they are doing to tell you which one is best.
If the wall above has enough integrity to be a shear wall, you can place supports in such a way as to support the structure on either side of the beam and remove and replace the beam without actually supporting the wall itself. This is due to the fact that a shear wall will support itself for a short period of time.
It it is not a shear wall, and the beam is not under the entire length of the wall giving you support under both ends of the wall, then you can bolt a beam to the side or both sides of the wall above and support the ends.
If the wall above is entirely supported by the beam, then you have to remove the beam in sections, adding support under the wall as you go. When you install the new beam, you push it into place from the side onto the end supports. Doing this allows the beam to push the temporary supports out from under the wall as the beam goes in. This can be tricky.
You could also bolt a beam to one side of the wall above, support that and then remove and replace the beam.
Which one works in your situation is up to you (and the best advice you can get from professionals).
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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support
load
Don't try this yourself but...
Normally you make holes in the wall above the beam. Insert supports through the wall and prop the ends. Once the props are supporting the wall you can then remove the beam.
...but there is a lot more to it than that.
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It sounds like you are describing cribbing inserted through holes in the wall above the beam, and fastened to adjacent studs? What would support the cribbing while the beam is removed? Would you cut holes in the floor adjacent to the beam and carry jacking posts through to the floor below?
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wrote:

the
yes and possibly even holes in the floor below so the load is carried all the wat to the ground. As others have said it may be easier to leave the beam in place and add new ones either side.
I should add that I've never done this myself.
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Mark G. wrote:

I think you could jack the existing beam string straight and then lag an engineered steel plate to the existing beam and be fine. The steel might look like a piece 5/16" thick and 9-10 inches wide with 9/16" holes drilled in it about 2-4" from each edge in a W pattern. I had to fix a framing error this summer and thats how we did it. Good luck. TonyG
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Why do you think you may need to replace the beam? What's wrong with the existing beam and what are you trying to do? Are the ends rotted, beam sag/split or are you trying to add clearance or reframe? Different problems, different solutions.
R
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