engineering training materials with respect to concrete masonry

I'm putting together a design draft of a home for later submission to an architect, and I'd like it to be as spot-on as possible without having to become an architect myself in the process. The home is primarily concrete block and heavy timber frame and I'm having some issues with laying the CMU courses such that they're structurally sound. I'm using 3dsmax to model it. The CMU pictured are standard 8x8x16 split-face blocks using stretcher bond. Here's a link to the latest draft:
http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/photo/2116492180100974754zTVbAZ
My problem is how to deal with T intersections and in general places that will require a half block to be used repetitively through the courses. I understand there are steel ties that can bind a wall butted to another wall in a T intersection if the blocks between them can't overlap. I don't know where the half blocks should be placed as to not affect the structural integrity of the wall though. I've heard corners are bad places.
Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I can better design the courses, or know or any reference material (online or in print) that has good information about the structural engineering principles of concrete masonry? Thanks all.
Kevin
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Kevin Fishburne wrote:

The architect just needs some basic drawings of your ideas...
The home is

You're going way to crazy about it. And 3DS Max is a terrible tool for what you're doing (I've done lots of 3D Stuff and Max is pretty weak at architectural modeling).
The CMU pictured are standard

I've never worried about it. If it's a problem, my structural engineer figures it out. If it's not a problem, the mason figures it out. You're wasting your own time doing stuff you don't need to do.

If you're using standard CMU sizes, then figure 8" W x 16" L x 8" H for your coursing (it's actually smaller, but with mortar, it ends up being that). If you use those dimensions for your modules (a 16" module works well), then you'll be OK. But you're still worrying about stuff you don't need to worry about.
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Seems to me you've gone way too far already. Why bother with an architect?
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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In a previous post Kevin Fishburne wrote...

Listen to all the good advice posted above. Let the structural engineer figure out out to reinforce the corners and intersections.
Amount of reinforcing will vary according to location.
You could learn this yourself. You only need to read and study three or four 400-page books. Of course, by the time you have done that the building code will change.
Bob Morrison, PE, SE R L Morrison Engineering Co Structural & Civil Engineering Poulsbo WA bob at rlmorrisonengr dot com
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On both wythes?

Stop and let the masons do it. Figure out what walls you're keen on. The architect will have a spec they like for masonry and details for things they don't want to leave to the masons.
If you're going to get picky about just how the blocks are laid you have to get picky about expansion joints, rebar, grouting, footings...

The question you ask about details isn't really structural engineering.
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