Design Public Buildings Around Bicycle Racks

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Bret Cahill wrote:

It's not that simple. You just need to sit in a programming meeting with a client (like the institution you're taking about) to realize the trickle-down effect of trying to make such design decisions.
I'm not saying there's a "better" solution to having the racks hidden away, but the idea that it's "simple" is false.
Not only that, but I've had experience on large college campuses where the bike racks are out in the open with parts and bikes being stolen or damaged in full light of day and with people all around. Short of posting a guard, you're not going to be 100% secure (and even with a guard I wouldn't expect security).
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Back in the day when I worked in offices (admittedly funky ones) I brought my bike up the elevator and locked it to my desk. ADA compliant elevators easily hold bikes. EDS
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Justice O'Conner must wonder about the bicycles parked in the stacks at the UA law library.
Bret Cahill
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"eds"

You hit the nail on the head, EDS. I just posted something similar. Sometimes some "design" solutions are but mere matters of a change in mentality, which of course lead to changes in behavior and expectation.
I've seen pictures of design offices, for example, with designers' bikes in the offices leaning against everything. They're attractive machines and they add to the office decor and ambiance.
If you're fun enough, you could even add a bike track that circumnavigates the office for those who want to get in a little excercise during their breaks. Yes, you can even drink coffee while riding a bike.
In fact, here are two of my older alt.arch posts on the subject. (Good god I was using my own name! :)

Rest of thread:
Big: http://groups.google.ca/group/alt.architecture/browse_thread/thread/b095751390c93563/649fb2699ae560b2?lnk=st&q=track+bike+group%3Aalt.architecture&rnum=1&hl=en#649fb2699ae560b2
Tiny: http://tinyurl.com/rcear
And...

Rest of thread:
Big: http://groups.google.ca/group/alt.architecture/browse_thread/thread/91ad1648b3b7ed94/02198de615ca50e0?lnk=st&q=track+bike+group%3Aalt.architecture&rnum=2&hl=en#02198de615ca50e0
Tiny: http://tinyurl.com/n8zub
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Bret Cahill wrote:

2 jobs ago: 1 bike rack in the open, right in front of the MAC Store on the ground floor. 2nd bike rack in the garage. I always used the one in the open, and my bike was never touched.
1 job ago: bike parking area in a room off the parking garage. This room had a locked door, with the combination only given to people who parked their bikes there. My bike was never touched.
Current job: Bike rack in parking garage, in a fenced, locked cage. You need to register with Security to get the combination. My bike hasn't been touched.
Of course, I can't see why any self-respecting thief would touch this:
http://home.pacifier.com/~jwills/jeff-big.jpg :-><
Jeff
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JeffWills wrote:

You should put one of those fake bullet hole decals on the fairing to give it a little more of the "I'm a bad ass and don't mess with my bike" edge. And start wearing leather chaps when you ride. Just don't go overboard or they'll try to recruit you for the Village People! ;)
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Acturly, I've painted mine to resemble a Mondrian, with yellow and red reflective swatches. I think that's more effective at confusing people.
A couple of my friends have copied fairings in Kevlar. Now *that's* bulletproof!
Jeff
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I'll pick up some neon orange spray paint this afternoon.
As for the quick release you can remove everything from the skewer and but a small 5mm- 8 nuts & washers at Home Depot
I like to think I'm a non materialistic guy but disabling someone's bike in the desert could be life threatening.
Bret Cahill
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"JeffWills"

Well that explains it. ;)
I think http://www.christini.com/bikes.php might do well to come up with a front wheel drive aluminum-framed, full-suspensioned recumbent, if they haven't already cancelled their bike line prospects. (they have a motorcycle line)
Two things I dislike about recumbents are their frames and ridiculously-long drive chains. A front-wheel-drive recumbent, if done properly, would be excellent!
Ever seen a recumbent motorcycle, btw? http://www.cybermotorcycle.com/gallery/monotrace/Monotrace%20France.htm http://www.treehugger.com/files/2005/12/ecomobile_if_yo.php http://motorcyclecity.com/bikewatch/Ecomobile / "We all love the open air aspect of motorcycles, but when the temperature is low and rain is falling, they're not the most comfortable vehicle one could occupy. Taking your lady out to dinner and a movie takes on a whole new meaning if it's a rainy 40 degrees outside! Now you can have your cake and eat it too if you own an Ecomobile. The handling and fun of a two wheeled machine with all the comforts of a fine European automobile. Who would have thought you could ride along in a contoured bucket seat listening to digital stereo music with heat and a windshield wiper, on a motorcycle! And yes, the Ecomobile is classified as a motorcycle."
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Warm Worm wrote:

I've seen lots of FWD recumbents, in both the fixed boom and swinging boom varieties. Here's a swinging boom FWD built from a mountain bike: http://www.cruzbike.com / Here's a fixed boom FWD (and world's fastest HPV): http://www.ohpv.org/albums/bm2004/varnas/pages/varnas14.htm

I like the open-air version: http://www.allamericanracers.com/alligator/alligator_home.html
Jeff
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"JeffWills"

That looks clever and funky. I tried to get a movie to see how the thing rides, and if one's legs turn, too, and also how solid the pedaling area is, since those should affect pedal efficiency. It seems rare to have something where the production-model is still, in a sense, the prototype. Perhaps there's some kind of engineering term for this.

I may have read about that. It would be cool if there could be a lighter, human or electric-powered production-model equivalent of a Ecomobile/Monotrace... Maybe there is.

That looks awkward, and I'd be curious to know how it rides and handles, how safe it is (with the engine in front) and/or if it made it into production. From the blurb on that link it still looks like it's in the planning stage, and from a brief Google, the death of someone working on the bike: http://home.earthlink.net/~jimmythralltribute/farewell1.html
The Ecomobile/Monotrace is a proven design, and apparently surprisingly safe, even in a crash.
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I suspect that the novelty value alone ("Hey, look what some fool left laying where I could snag it!") might be enough. I've heard of thefts of things that were worth less, and required more work to lug off.
--
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