Bamboo buildings - any thoughts?

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Secretia Green wrote:

hmm, considered using the flooring on the next project fer sure.

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I didn't mean to imply that was the case, just that this is a phemonenon I've come across a lot through the years. It's just something that can be a deterrent for some folks, and an annoyance to those of us who are more pighead...OOPS!, *determined*, yeah, that's what I meant to say, determined...! <L!>

WHich is why I was confused. WHich in turn brings out my compulsively pedantic side =:-o
((Plus Kekule is one of my favorite examples, so resisting the urge to mention him is almost impossible ;) ))

I don't recall, but i'm thinking more about areas, as mentioned, where Bamboo grws well and fast, but trees tend to struggle and/or grow really slowly.
It's along the lines of "designing for the local conditions" - sometime,s materials and designs can be successfully brought from one area and used in another, but often, the opposite is true: what works well in one climate and geographical location can be a disaster in another climate and geogrpahical area. Both are considerations, becasue even if 2 areas have technically-similar climates, other factors (from geology to economics) are often different, based upon the location.
Wood shingles/clapboard makes a good example - worked well in some areas, but in Houston, combining the heat plus the humidity (subtropical climate) dramatically shortens the life of any sort of wood cladding. People still *use* it, but it rots quickly and encourages termites (esp. when people pile mulch right up to the slab). IN Vancouver, there were problem with the newer homes that used Acrylic stucco - it is good in California, because it can exm pand and contract with the temperature extremes experienced in arid and semi-arid climates, but it's prone to water infiltration in wet climates. In the Houston area, what gets called "stucco" has also gotten such a bad reputation, in part due to imporper material and in part due to poor application, that many insureance companies simply won't cover it against damage, and most insist upon a rigorous set of installation specifications.
With Bamboo, I'm sure that a purely-Bamboo stucture here wouldn't last a very long time; OTOH, given the size and strangth of that Giant Timber Bamboo, and of course if good attachment methods could be worked out, I could see it working out for certain components of a structure, especially given how well it seems to grow in this area, and places like Florida for example. If nothing else, I wonder whether it could work out for things like Gazebos and Sheds, which currently use wood products but typically are short-lived structures.
I just don't think it ought to be discounted out-of-hand, depending upon what area is being considered. In that respect, it's like Adobe or rammed earth - both can work well in someplace like Arizona, or areas of New Mexico and California, but prob. not in Houston or Vancouver. It relates to the whole idea of Indigenous Architecture - how and why certain building styles develop, and certain materials become widely used, is certain areas and climates. Like, if I had to move to Tornado Ally, I'd want a robust concrete structure, or at the very least, a "safe room" if there was no convertable basement - but most definitely *NOT* a bamboo house <LOL!!>
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wrote:

Oh, I was just teasing you. I guess I shoulda made that more clear...

But, taking that example, is nailing the only, or even best, way to attach things? Are there other or better ways? I don't know, which is whwy I'm aksing - I simply have it in my nature to reject ideas out-of- hand because they aren't based upon or equivalent to a given method.
I don't think it'd be a good idea to build houses in *all* areas using bamboo in part or whole, but I think that, for areas where it's difficult to grow suitable trees, it has potential.
Plus, some of the designs in the links provided in the Troppo posts looked kinda nifty to me ;)
- K.

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wrote:

I keep thinking about the joinery used in wicker lawn furniture that frequently is built around a bamboo frame. Perhaps the same techniques, on a larger scale, would be viable for buildings.

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I don't know whetehr that'd be sttong enough - I have to look inot it more and see how modern bamboo structures are done. I've no idea whetehr one could, for example, use bamboo in conjunction with traditional building techniques - for example, in cross-bracing. I'd have to look into it.
- K.
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When I was in Hong Kong several years ago, they used bamboo scaffolding to go up, ummm, 6 stories (maybe more, I've forgotten). Scaffolding certainly doesn't require the spans tht houses would, though. Also, if you enclosed the bamboo framing, you wouldn't be able to keep tabs on the method used to secure one to another.
--
chrles

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On Jul 10, 12:46am, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Charles Bishop) wrote:

Well, it's technology and materials that they've been working with for thousands of years - I don't think they're that concerned about it.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/biwook/390088839 / http://gotouring.com/howdy/book1/pages/136-China-scaffold.htm
Best link I've seen: http://bambus.rwth-aachen.de/eng/reports/buildingmaterial/buildingmaterial.html
R
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Charles Bishop) wrote in

Good point. Since houses in less temperate zones need to be able to accomidate insulation, I guess that in and of itself might put the proverbial Kabosh on the idea...
- K.
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