what type of thermostat should I buy

Hi,
I have a property into which I am having a replacement (combi) CH boiler fitted
Currently there is a basic wired thermostat in the hallway, at the end of a less than (ascetically) ideal wiring run, though as I am moving the boiler to an alternative location that will have to be replaced anyway
I understand that I can get a wireless thermostat/controller, but what are pro/cons of this?
Do the batteries run out unexpectedly and leave you without heating? (or have to be replaced frequently)
I am looking for a comprehensive controller, preferably with different temp settings for different times of the day
can I get this functionality in a wired thermostat?
finally note that I do not want an internet connected device.
thanks
tim
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On 22/10/2018 09:43, tim... wrote:

I have a salus wireless, it gives a battery warning if low. I find it ideal as I can move it around to the room I am using. It also has setting for time of day and temp. Bought from ebay: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Salus-RT500RF-5-2-7-Day-Programmable-Digital-Wireless-Room-Thermostat/352486299931?epid `11377247&hash=item5211d2191b:g:ovcAAOSwYFpbRmXa:rk:26:pf:0
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As long as none of the people using it have eyesight issues, people say these devices are good. I understand that most of the talking ones are wired in. Brian
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Not now that so many are done using the smartphone or one of the Echoes etc.

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Well I'll cross that bridge when/if I come to it.
I've cornered myself into having to replace the hob if I ever have to have a pacemaker (with my medical history, not a negligible possibility)
tim
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On 22/10/2018 09:43, tim... wrote:

Yes. A wired programmable thermostat would do what you want. The Danfoss TP9000 is a two channel programmer which would also turn off the hot water when you don't want it to heat up.
Heatmiser make a range of programmable thermostats. If connected to the internet they do allow access from an Android device, but they don't have to be connected.
Both the above allow use of a remote sensor. I have earlier versions of both the above at separate locations.

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well thanks for this, but

what part of Combi do you not understand? :-)
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On 22/10/2018 11:16, tim... wrote:

The Worcester combi I have actually has its own programmer which allows the hot water to be switched off. Stops the boiler running at all and keeping a little bit water hot all then time. Perhaps you like to waste energy!
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On 22/10/2018 10:13, Michael Chare wrote:

The OP is fitting a combi, so the DHW channel will only add confusion IMHO
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On 22/10/2018 09:43, tim... wrote:

Certainly. I have a digistat 3 which meets all of my similar needs.
https://www.draytoncontrols.co.uk/products/programmable-thermostats/digistats-programmable/digistat3?redirected-from=Digistat3ProgrammableRoomThermostats
Other similar items are available from other vendors.

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On 22/10/2018 09:43, tim... wrote:

The house we have recently left had a wired programmable thermostat. I cant recall the make but it worked well. Yes when the batteries ran out it did cease to function but I routinely replaced them (two AAA) annually to avoid the issue.
This has reminded me to buy another for our new home
Mike
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On 22/10/2018 09:43, tim... wrote:

Pros:
no need for wiring.
You can move the stat about. (note that can also be a con if you move it to somewhere already controlled by a TRV - you may just end up defeating your boiler interlock)
Cons: See last pro above, and Batteries need replacing (although they will probably last several years) May have connection problems of the transmitter and receiver are too far apart.

They might do - but usually last years, and are commonly available types (i.e. AAs)

That's a programmable stat or prog stat. You probably don't want a full "programmer" since you have no DHW re-heat to control.
Note you will come across two types of prog stat - "normal" and "optimising".
The normal ones allow you to specify a number of different windows during the day, and (usually) also specify the temperature of each. When the new time slot start, the heating will fire if required and keep going until the required temperature is reached. So if you way I want it to be 21 degrees between 7am and 9am, it will turn on at 7am, and will reach 21 degrees some time later.
The optimising one will attempt to learn the heating characteristics of the property, and fire before each new time slot, so that when the slot starts, the temperature is already at the preset value. So using the example above it might fire the heating at 6am, so that it will be 21 degrees at 7am. Note that with properties that are difficult to heat, this might mean the heating fires hours before the actual time slot.

Yup and wireless.

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On 2018-10-22, John Rumm wrote:

IME they don't quite last a year but I may be replacing them overcautiously whenever I notice the battery warning indicator on the thermostat.
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On Mon, 22 Oct 2018 09:43:41 +0100, tim... wrote:

<https://www.wolseley.co.uk/product/center-radio-frequency-programmable- room-thermostat/>
Does the move around the house and stuff. Works fine with out combi and a single zone. As already suggested, the trick is to move it to the room where you want the temperature to match the thermostat. We generally keep in the front corner downstairs room on the North facing wall, which is usually the coolest room in the house.
Thermostatic valves on the radiators which gives reasonable protection from over heating the rest of the house.
Cheers
Dave R
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On Monday, 22 October 2018 09:44:53 UTC+1, tim... wrote:

a

r

e

mp

To get multiple temps at different times you need a programmable stat. Yes you can get them wired. And yes, when the batteries run out the heating is left on full blast all the time on some. And yes, the batteries will die & leak, killing the thing in short order. And no, they're nothing like as rel iable as the old bimetals. And nothing like as easy to use as a bimetal. I got rid of the one here & been perfectly happy with the bimetal.
Wireless ones are great if you want to lose the thing, have some oik stand on it & break it etc.
NT
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On 22/10/2018 09:43, tim... wrote:

Pros, no wiring. Cons. Batteries need replacing. Mine has often required re synchronisation after a thunderstorm

Yes, the batteries do run out and leave you without heating unless you can override them, no its not frequently - once a year seems about riught. I battery mine up a spart of et autum CH seriving.#

Thats oirthogonal to how it transits the 'GO' signal to the CH system

Probably Been years since I bothered to look
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Yes. Although wired, they are often battery operated for the electronic part, But with a pretty long life.
You might also look into weather compensation. Trouble with a single stat is it only measures the temperature in that area. WC does seem to make the system more efficient in gas use overall. At a cost.
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wrote:

I've only got three rooms (plus bathroom and hallway)
It's a middle floor flat with only one aspect
it's in the South of England.
doesn't seem worth the bother.
tim
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On 22/10/2018 09:43, tim... wrote:

The hallway is not the ideal place for a thermostat. You are much better positioning the thermostat in the room where you sit/live the most and make that room most comfortable for, say, watching TV in the evening.
I've only had experience of a couple of basic wireless thermostats (circa £50) but:
The batteries last for over a year and there have been low battery (visual) warnings.
The controllers that I've had can be programmed for at least 3 on/off times per day and for different temperature settings for each on time and for each off time (the latter can be set for frost protection). They have also had "shortcut" modes of setting up, say, same settings for week days and a different setting for a weekend.
Search the internet for a suitable wireless thermostat and then check Youtube for and instructional video.
You may find that these days more of the all singing, all dancing wireless controllers come with an internet option but you don't have to use them this way.
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"Holiday Mode" is good. Set a min temp for whilst you are away and set the number of days you will be away. Come back to a warm home! Some have "PArty Mode" which enables you to add a number of hours of continuation of the existing temp.
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