TOT: one for you scientists



I've often thought that farmers should be paid for potatoes by dry weight. As you say, they're almost all bloated with water these days and almost uniformly tasteless.
Tim
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On 21/05/13 17:45, Tim+ wrote:

correct.
try avoiding maris piper, king edward and concentrate in desiree, and if you can find it vanessa. That has to be my favorite late early..

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On 21/05/2013 18:15, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

The best I have had in recent years have been Red Duke of York - but they tend to be expensive. At their best Rooster are OK, but tend to have a lot of black areas. Suspect Rooster are some sort of offspring of Desiree?
Don't remember Vanessa - will look out for them.
Tend to avoid the "composer" ones - Mozart, Vivaldi, etc.
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On 21/05/13 18:41, polygonum wrote:

not tried those. will check em out.

Rooster are probably rebranded desiree

rare in shops. I buy em from farmers in sacks.

yes...
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When Red Roosters first hit the shelves were a rich yellow colour and so hard they were almost woody (and they were very tasty). Since then, they've become watery pretty much like most other varieties.
Tim
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I have microwave 'baked' potatoes nearly every day.
Typically, in my 800W oven, depending on the size of the potato, up to 1.5 minutes lying on one side, then 1.5 minutes lying on the other side. [In my oven, the lower side cooks fastest.] Leave for 1 minute, then on the lowest power setting (mine is 'Warm'), up to 8 minutes. Done carefully, the resulting potato is 'al dente' - cooked, but still slightly crisp - which really brings out the flavour.
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Ian

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I get those most days.
I don’t peel them at all, like the peel.
Wash the dirt off them with a brush if they arent bought washed.
Put a single spud on the plate its going to be eaten off, with a big plastic cover that covers the entire plate. Give it a minute or 3 at full power depending on the size of the spud. Add the peas and corn in a glass cup and give the total 4 mins more.
Drain the plate/spud/cover into the sink. Take the cover off, wipe the plate dry with a teatowel. Tip the peas and corn into a small plastic sieve, add to plate. Slice into the spud, not all way down. Add a sliver of butter or marg. Add a fresh large golf ball sized tomato sliced into sixths Add the meat, eat.
Those spuds are lovely, leaves boiled spuds for dead.
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 15:14:20 +0100, The Natural Philosopher

Warmed from the inside out?
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On 22/05/2013 09:22, Apellation Controlee wrote:

Roughly speaking that is true.
Microwave radiation penetrates the food and heats it to a depth broadly comparable with half it's wavelength which for 2.45GHz is about 6cm.
Cooking a prepared grape in a microwave oven is somewhat amusing although the plasma ball it produces may damage the internals. Plenty of youtube videos around of what happens:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwZNon4ijXo&list=UUGLRJlIftqfqmkgnWOFnSRA

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wrote:

Yep, instead of being warmed from the outside in in a conventional oven, in a microwave the microwaves are absorbed by what is being heated so they are heated from the inside to the outside.
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On Thu, 23 May 2013 06:24:33 +1000, "Rod Speed"

This was what everybody - well, most of us - believed to be the case when microwave ovens first became common kitchen appliances, but the circumstances where this is true are limited:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microwave_ovens
At the foot of the block headed "Principles":
"The previous paragraph notwithstanding, the interior of small food items can reach a higher temperature than the surface because the interior is thermally insulated from the air. It is possible to burn the inside of a cookie while the exterior remains unbrowned."
In case you object to a cite from Wikipedia, as many do, there are several other sites where the "inside-to-outside" proposition is disputed, this being just one: http://allegoric.us/ZfPreP
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Its true with the veg being discussed.

That proves that it IS cooked from the inside.
It wouldn't see the exterior remaining unbrowned if it was cooked from the outside.

I don't.

Doesn't apply to the veg being discussed.
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On Fri, 24 May 2013 06:14:26 +1000, "Rod Speed"

No, it states there are exceptions (one of which, I agree, is peas).
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wrote

Its actually all veg because its too small to see the other effect.
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Microwave 'baked' potatoes certainly start by being cooked on the outside (or at least, just under the surface). I doubt if the RF ever reaches the centre, so it takes a while for the heat to penetrate. I give them a full power burst for up to 2 minutes on each side (and by then the outside is definitely softening), then a 'simmer' at the lowest power for (say) up to 8 minutes (which allows tine for the whole potato to cook),
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Mine don't.

Mine always do.

Doesn't happen with mine and I don't cook them for very long at all.

I only ever cook mine on full power and don't bother to turn them because the oven has a very effective turntable system.

But you don't know what the inside is doing.

I do them at full power for the entire time. With no difference between the outside and the inside when they are ready to eat.
Even when I don't give them enough time to cook, they are still the same right thru, not soft enough.

Mine doesn't with the entire time on full power.
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On Sat, 25 May 2013 20:45:33 +1000, "Rod Speed"

With our oven (1000W) on full power [1] the centre is the slowest to become cooked.
[1] The oven is 20+ years old so some efficiency may have been lost.
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It's unlikely that efficiency is the problem. I very much doubt if 2.4GHz microwaves really penetrate a potato to a depth of more than (say) 1/2". Cooking the 'core' will rely on an outer 'shell' of heat spreading inwards by conduction.
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Ian

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On 25/05/13 17:18, Ian Jackson wrote:

Its not that simple
http://www.pueschner.com/downloads/basics_adv_en.pdf
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wrote

I don't get any visible difference between the center and the outer, but I also don't normally use potatoes bigger than tennis ball size either.
I never cut them, I always zap them whole and just put a slice in them to put the butter/marg in after they are cooked, just before eating.
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