Tit Behaviour

Hi guys
I tried this on uk-birdwatching, but that group is getting about one post a month so here goes...
We have a bird box currently inhabited by bluetits. The bit we are struggling with is trying to work out the state of play.
Watching the movement it looks like there are two birds that are flying in and out of the box but they are not collecting nest material. It seems they are picking up grubs or going to the feeder then returning to the box.  I always expect one to stay on the nest as I haven't heard any little ones yet.
With this behaviour, are these already hatched little ones flying around?
One other question on birds in general, how long do the common garden birds live  for?
Thanks
Phil
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Thanks for the info guys.
I have certainly heard the inhabitants of the box in previous years. Maybe this is when the chicks are fairly well developed. One year I decided to lift the lid as I hadn't heard or seen much that year. I thought better of it when there was a buzzing sound from inside the box and waited till later in the year to remove the bee's nest.
Phil
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Its worse if its wasps. Generally bees are ok. AS for how long birds live, its a bit of a problem this one. Certainly the same robin has been attending our garden for at least five years accordiing to my neighbour as it always has a slightly uneven tail and is very friendly, often waiting when the garden impliments come out sort of suggesting he gets digging cos he is waiting for the worms to be revealed. If a bird could tap its foot impatiently this would be the one I guess. Brian
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On 13/05/2017 10:37, TheChief wrote:

They are trying to feed their young in the box, its a full time job for them.

The bigger the bird the longer they tend to live for. The small ones probably two to five years depending on how many cats there are.
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On Sat, 13 May 2017 10:37:06 +0100 (GMT+01:00), TheChief

I think once the eggs have hatched, initially the female may continue to sit on them intermittently to keep them warm, but eventually both parents will work like stink to feed them. They can have up to a dozen chicks in one brood.

Once the youngsters have left the nest, they don't usually return, but hang around in the neighbourhood, still being fed by their parents, and trying to avoid becoming food for other predators, themselves.

Not that long. A couple of years or so, maybe.
Some useful general info on bluetits here https://www.bto.org/volunteer-surveys/nbc/blue-tit-blog

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Chris

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writes

They don't make much noise after hatching.
Last year, I closed off a hollow section of apple tree with a bit of sheet lead and the appropriate 1" hole. There was lots of interest but no nesting.
This year, the first thing I noticed was both parents dashing back and forth with food.
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On 13/05/17 10:37, TheChief wrote:

I've got a Raspberry Pi based camera in my nestbox and the first chick appeared this morning (I'm in the north midlands, about 700ft up).
The male blue tit took up residence back in January if not before. He attracted a mate about four weeks ago who destroyed my camera cable in a fit of psychotic rage. I replaced it and built in a false ceiling to protect the camera - the wide angle adapter seems to have been thrown out so I have a restricted view in the box now.
Starting three weeks ago she laid seven eggs over seven days and, after the last one was laid, started incubating them. This should mean they all hatch together. During the two week incubation the male fed her from time to time.
Now we have a chick in the box the male is passing caterpillars to the female who then feeds the chick. Normal behaviour is that this continues as the other six chicks hatch and fledge over the next three weeks or so. After the last chick has hatched the hen should also forage for caterpillars - each chick eventually needs 100 a day!
I haven't got a microphone in the box but I haven't heard any chicks from outside the box.

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We've now got three eggs and four chicks. My God they're ugly.
Another Dave
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