tile grout cleaning question

Sorry to be asking such a novice question but I have some thin powdery dried tile grout on some of my new shower tiles (Not obvious because of the colour but you can feel it when you are in the shower and touching the tiles).
Am I right in thinking its just a matter of elbow grease and nylon scourer or is there a special product I can use to get rid of it?
I don't want to spoil the glaze on the new tiles.
Reason for stupidity, didn't realise the tiler chap hadn't done a very good job of cleaning off the grout until we got back from our hols and started using the shower.
dedics
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Ian & Hilda Dedic wrote:

I'd try a window scraper. Plastic handle with a stanley blade type thing
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stuart noble wrote:

won't that scratch the glaze?
dedics
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Ian & Hilda Dedic wrote:

No, its very hard to scratch glaze (or glass for that matter) with a steel blade - even using some force.
You can get commercial grout cleaners. I expect these are just weak solutions of HCL. Patio cleaner would also do the trick used sparingly.
Once it is all clean, it would also be worthwhile treating with Lithofin grout protector. That will keep it clean and new looking for many years.
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John.

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John Rumm wrote:

I imagine most wall grouts are acrylic, which probably wouldn't respond to acid

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stuart noble wrote:

You may imagine what you like, all the ones i have used respond to acid.

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stuart noble wrote:

Can't say I have ever seen an acrylic grout. Epoxy perhaps - but unlikely to be used on a shower.
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John Rumm wrote:

What else is a standard white grout likely to be? Something has to make it set, and it isn't cement
Epoxy perhaps - but

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stuart noble wrote:

I think you will find it *is* actually white cement and a very fine aggregate.
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John Rumm wrote:

I'd say it was too bright white to be even partly cement
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Don't be silly. It contains white cement. Cement isn't always grey. The colour of tile grout depends at least partly on the colour of cement used.
John Rumm is exactly right; the ingredients are cement and fine fillers - basically the stone dust extracted from crushing operations at quarries.
There is also "sanded grout" which is used where the gaps to be grouted are wider than 3mm. This grout contains cement, fine fillers and some sand.
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Bruce wrote:

Was going through boxes of stuff in the garage today, and opened one to see what was it it. Loads of cans, bottles, etc, and sat there on top was a tub of "Waterproof acrylic grout"...
So there, now I have seen an Acrylic one. ;-)

To be fair - both exist, although the commonly available powdered ones are typically cement based IME. e.g:
http://www.trades-direct.co.uk/modules/shop/products.asp?rangeid 5
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John Rumm wrote:

I wasn't dreaming then :-) Or dreaming that I'd used it on several occasions.

It all comes down to your interpretation of "white" I suppose. AFAIK the titanium white we're used to seeing isn't possible with cement, but maybe white tiles aren't bright white either. Interesting that the BAL Microflex is cement based but is also flexible i.e. it contains "built-in admixture to provide flexibility". Can cement really be made flexible? Try telling that to the conservationists!
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<obama>
Yes, it can!
</obama>
There is a whole range of admixtures that can provide flexibility in the matrix. The hydrated cement particles are still stiff; the flexibility comes from what is in the matrix around them.

There is no reason for conservationists to consider anything cement based, especially with admixtures that have not yet stood the test of centuries of time, when the perfect original materials are still available in the form of lime mortar etc..
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Bruce wrote:

The secret motto of conversationists is to make the repair as rotten as the original was, so they don't do themselves out of business ;-)
I believe portland cement was first used in major form to construct the giant sewer that runs under the embankment.
Its already lasted longer than most lime mortar houses have..
But never allow facts to affect dogma eh?
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LOL! ;-)

Portland cement is the basis of most modern construction. But it does have its weaknesses, one of which is its strength - IYSWIM.
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stuart noble wrote:

Was not doubting its existence, just did not think it was a common as the powdered cement based type.

The last one I used was a Nicobond powdered grout - cement based and very "white". I don't think cement poses any limitation on colour (or lack of)

You can make springs (and lots of other non intuitive things) out of concrete if you want! You can get flexible boat hulls made from concrete as well.
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John.

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White cement is at best off white. Grouts are *bright* white. Ready mixed grouts don't go off in the tub, cement would. Try thinking.

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stuart noble wrote:

Well, assuming coloured is the same base as white, from la bouche du cheval:
UNIBOND READY MIXED COLOURED WALL TILE GROUT
COMPOSITION COMMENTS Water based adhesive based on styrene acrylic co-polymer and silica filler.
And == UNIBOND CERAMIC WALL TILE GROUT
COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
WHITE PORTLAND CEMENT 30-60%
COMPOSITION COMMENTS Cement-based grout with mineral filler.
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Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
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No, they aren't. You can deceive yourself as much as you like, but even the whitest grouts are not remotely "bright" white.

You never have - so try taking your own advice for a change.
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