Shaving off door bottom

On 23/03/2016 23:38, David Lang wrote:

Agreed. Unless it's only 1 or 2mm - and even then I find it difficult to get a consistent depth with a plane.

Yep - just did one with the Lidl cordless circular saw and the surprisingly good sawboard.
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On Wednesday, 23 March 2016 22:48:22 UTC, John Smith wrote:

I used a rasp last time, took a while longer than perhaps a plane would have, but I only needed a few mm's off, it was a relativley weak bathroom door rather than solid wood.
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On 24/03/2016 11:43, whisky-dave wrote:

The beauty of the circ saw method is that you can take off nothing at all at one end and, say, 5mm at the other. Perfect cut every time. Plenty of doors have been butchered over the years by plane and handsaw merchants, and this is a way of straightening things up.
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But the major downside for someone like the OP is that you do need to be able to calculate how much needs to be taken off and you've fucked the door if you take off too much. The big advantage with using a plane is that that approach is a lot more forgiving so you are much less likely to fuck the door.
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On 24/03/2016 17:12, Rod Speed wrote:

You are far more likely to fuber the door with a power plane, halfwit.
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Bullshit, fuckwit.
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On 24/03/2016 20:00, Rod Speed wrote:

Do stop making a fool of yourself. Five minutes ago you didn't even know there was end grain on the bottom of a door.
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Quite. Anyone who recommends a power plane to a newbie for a one off job has never used one. Especially on something as unwieldy as a door.
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*Sorry, I don't date outside my species.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 25/03/2016 10:43, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Nail, hit, head.
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There you go, face down in the mud, as always.
No wonder the BBC gave you the bums rush, right out the door on your lard arse and you ended up an alcoholic.

Even terminal fuckwit such as yourself should be able to work out how to stand it on one of its long sides, then turn it over and stand it on the other long side, if someone was actually stupid enough to lend you a seeing eye dog and white cane.
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Oh - you've fallen over when using your power plane then?

If you say so it must be true. ;-)

You've already been told the best way to do the job by experts. So best just shut up and learn by your mistakes. Some chance.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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You never could bullshit your way out of a wet paper bag.
Even a terminal fuckwit such as yourself should be able to work out what the word YOU means if someone was actually stupid enough to lend it a seeing eye dog and a white cane.

It isn't the best way for someone like the OP who has never done a door before.
And even a terminal fuckwit union bludging alcoholic should have noticed FAR more people have said in here that they did the door fine using other ways than that fool that got the bums rush from Nilfisk proclaims is the only viable way to do a door.
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On 25/03/2016 17:56, Rod Speed wrote:

The halfwit appears to only have one ad hominem attack.

Mr Plowman wouldn't need to do that, he knows how to do it properly.
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wrote

Like hell he does with the OP.
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Do you mean that when the door is wide open there was enough room under it for the carpet fitters to put down the carpet and that it's only when you try to close it that it becomes jammed?
If you just want to be able to close the door even if it is still a bit stiff from rubbing, then it should be possible to remove enough off of the bottom of the door without removing it, by sanding.
What I do is make up a simple tool from thin flexible steel to hold the abbrasive paper and move the door backwards and forwards over it. A piece about 2ft by 4in is suitable, bend over the last 2in on each end and cut a piece of sand paper to fit pressing down the ends to hold it in place. Open the door wide and push it under the end, use your foot to hold it in place and move the door backwards and forwards over it 20 times, move the tool inwards and repeat until you reach the hinge end and then move outwards repeating. Hoover up the debris put on a new piece of abbrasive, close the door a bit and repeat. Keep doing this until enough has been removed to allow the door to close. It's a bit tedious but if you have kids or grandchildren they'll have fun "helping".
I'm assuming that you have checked that the fitters did their job properly and haven't trapped underlay or carpet under the metal door sill stopping it from closing.
Alan
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On 25/03/2016 12:17, Alan Dawes wrote:

I'm tired out just thinking about that approach :-)
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On 23/03/2016 22:48, John Smith wrote:

You have certainly excited a hornets nest with this question.
For a one-off door I would use a power planer, with one proviso, that you always push into the door, and never let the blade emerge whilst cutting across the grain.
I would run a pencil on top of the carpet marking the door along the whole of the bottom, so leaving a couple of mm clearance. Best done with the door near shut.
Take door off.
Set plane to near zero depth setting.
Run plane in from one side, and after a few strokes adjust depth to take off some material, the same from the other side.
If you allow the plane to emerge whilst cutting across the grain, the blade will take with it a chunk of door. This is why even Mr Lang says he is happy to use a planer on the sides, where you'd be planing along the grain.
If you have the time and the resources, the sawboard method is perhaps the most reliable.
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Assuming you have the sense to know how to mark how much to take off, it's quicker. Done in one pass with a near perfect cut - which you'd need a lot of skill to do with a power plane.
I get the impression few here remember the first time they used a power plane. Or just have very low standards.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 27/03/2016 15:21, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

ROFLMAO!
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On 27/03/2016 15:21, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

You have to make the sawboard first.

For many years I used a conventional plane, then bought a B&D power variety and never looked back until the armature burnt out on that and the second one was stolen.
As you imply, I don't recall the very first time I used one, but was probably very careful taking just very thin cuts. I feel you have more control than the hand planer.
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