Protecting tools in unheated shed from rust etc

I have had some complaints about the number of tools kept in the house cupboards so am considering leaving them down the unheated shed. There are no drawers or cupboards in there - just shelves. I keep small tools (needlefiles etc) in biscuit tins with the old anti-rust paper (forget its name). The better hand tools, currently in the house, are saws, chisels, set squares and planes. I am thinking that the plastic bins available in the sheds for household storage might be ok if filled with old oily jumpers etc. What do others do?
Secondary question about putting my power tools there - mostly in their plastic carry boxes (drills, grider, sander) - any problems with damp affecting the motors?
Geo
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I was going to suggest wrapping them in oily rags ..Spray with WD 40 or try silica gel sachets .
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Stuart wrote:

I've heard of using a bucket of salt to remove the moisture as it's hygroscopic, attracts moisture, but it sounds like hassle because you have to keep replacing the salt, or dry in out. If you power in the shed a small dehumidifier would work well. I use one in my garage but they don't work below about 4degrees. The WD40 rags and some ventilation could work reasonably well. Wooden shelves and toolboxes create less condensation than steel ones in my experience. Don't have the shed totally airtight (unlikely). Al
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I don't have the problem very much any more, (heated workshop), but there are a few techniques:
- For the lower grade tools, a wipe with oil of some kind.
- For the better tools use camellia oil because this is effective but does not cause problems if it gets onto materials being worked.
- You could make a cabinet (or buy a DIY store kitchen cabinet for about the same money) and install a small light bulb in it - 40W is enough. Drill holes in the shelves to allow air circulation. This would also be OK for power tools. I wouldn't put them in a damp and unheated shed.
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Sorry guys - I neglected to mention no power supply - and having just laid the "patio" the orange extension lead will have to do me.
Geo
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cupboards
My car chrome vanadium spanners etc had not minded that much, other items are prone to rust and need to be covered with WD40. I don't leave items such as my plane or my micrometer screw guage in the garage.

plastic
I've not had any problems with power tools (after 20 years), mostly the metal parts are copper which does not mind that much
--

Michael Chare




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