PAT testing class I or class II

On 22/07/2018 00:16, Steve Walker wrote:

The approach some companys have to Elfin Safety is not to analyse to see if there really is real world risk but to put up an arse covering notice.
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last year, I bought a secondhand radio microphone system. The microphone had a PAT sticker on it!
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from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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On 21/07/18 08:04, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

And the silly nonsense I see when a PAT inspector cannot even be bothered to examine the whole length of a desk power block lead because "it's a bit hard to take it out from the under desk tray". I did not observe fuses being checked for kitemarks. Basically, plug in tester and see if it says pass or fail.
The only really useful test there is continuity being within limits. You'd have to try astoundingly hard to fail the IR test. Perhaps with something very very old and obviously decrepit.
The whole thing is a bloody waste of time for the most part - far more useful to teach every single member of staff to look at their own leads one in a while for chafing and damage. Which is what actually *should* happen, but never does.
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The original idea was that in most offices, there would be someone with sufficient knowledge to get the certification themselves, and it would be mainly a DIY function.
You do not need to be an electrician to do inspection and testing, and as you say, some rudimentary education can be given to everyone to look out for obvious faults with appliances, cables, and plugs.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On 21/07/2018 08:04, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

My brother like to mess those about that tell him it needs to be done. He gets a lot of phone calls at work from people selling PAT testing. If they say that "he has to have it done, "it's a legal requirement " etc he books them in.
When they get to his garage he says "I have decided not to have the tests done, you lied to me on the phone, go away"
He does not get as many sales calls as he used to.
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Adam

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On 21/07/18 00:39, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The main issue I think is with the courses. I did mine with the IET and we had 2 blokes, and one was clearly an engineering type and added a great deal of basic understanding to the course - the "this is why we do that..." approach.
So we left with a reasonably good understanding.
Some courses I imagine would be highly parrot like:
"Book says when X, do Y"
Then you get people who might be able to do the testing under normal situations but don't really understand what they are doing - which is less helpful if they meet unusual situations.
It harks back to the days of supplementary "earth" bonding being a new idea and people running bits of wire to every lump of metal they could see in the room.
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     snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

I've looked at the course materials for 4-5 training courses and they were all very poor to the point of being wrong in many cases. That's a mixture of manufacturers' courses and independant courses.
I formed the view when I was involved in specifying PAT testing procedures that any tester must present their C&G 2377 certificate on arrival. No other course or certificate is acceptable.
It does have to be said that when training people, coming up with the rules for identifying Class I from Class II products is probably one of the most difficult parts, but it's critical to proper inspection and testing. Writing down rules, which also cope with old products and products which have been incorrectly repaired in the past, and don't run to several pages of A4 is probably impossible. It really needs a good understanding of the priciples and common appliance construction methods.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On 20/07/2018 19:42, ARW wrote:

How about the grammatical error in the URL? (should be do, not does...)
Andy
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