OT: Boiler Problem Update (what is a 3 part zone?)

"AMO" snipped-for-privacy@SpamFreeWorld.com says...

Plubers aren't reasonable, they're necessary - unless you can find a cowboy or do it yourself.

http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/TLMP3.html
I told you this a week ago.
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says...

the
Thanx Rob - I must have been dozing when you mentioned this - I don't recall your post.
The first comment you made - are you suggesting that plumbers charge the world but I should go with them?
Thanx.
AMO
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"AMO" snipped-for-privacy@SpamFreeWorld.com says...

Good plumbers aren't cheap. Bad plumbers can be even more expensive. Call a few other plumbers for quotes before you decide. A job like this should be within the capabilities of someone who is comfortable changing plugs and tap-washers/ballcocks, but it could be traumatic if it went wrong :-) As long as you have the right parts and suitable tools and prepare properly you should manage it, but if you're unsure then you could put yourself through some stress and then end up calling in a plumber anyway.
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3-port valve. If that requires a drain down, a complete new valve fitted, re-filling with inhibitor, then that is a good price. He should be there bets part of the day, draining , filling and getting the air out.
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I had a problem about 3 years ago where the radiators wouldn't turn off. 3 port valve was extremely stiff, the actuator motor being unable to close the CH side. Anyway did it without a complete drain down.
1. Close water feed to CH header tank. 2. Close all radiator valves, both sides. 3. Close isolating valves either side of pump. 4. Place a rubber bung on outlet pipe of CH tank. I chopped up old tubes of set silicone sealant to make bungs. Somebody else said use carrots covered in cling film. Or you could buy propper rubber bungs from a lab ware outlet. 5. Prepare 3 22mm bungs for the 3 ports of the valve. 6. Remove 3 port valve, catch escaped water. 7. Put bungs in the openings. 8. Clean valve. My case was slight leakage around the valves first O ring had scaled up and jammed the valve. Cleaned with descaler, re-assembled packed with silicone grease. 9. Put back, remove loft bung and opened all valves. Remove air from system and test and check for leaks. 10. Still working fine 3 years later.
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ian snipped-for-privacy@tcp.co.uk says... <snip>

So you missed the opportunity to flush out all the crap and top up the system with nice new inhibitor :-)
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says...

New system in a new house, only 1 year old. Easier to fix myself rather than go back to the builders to fix as in the intervening year had been bought out numerous times and seemed to deny all knowledge they had even built the house !!! Anyway water ran clear, which was not surprising as first thing I did when moving in the house was drain the system and refill adding Fernox.
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I would like to drain my central heating system myself and refill it, including a suitable dose of inhibitor. However, I cannot find a draining outlet anywhere on the system except high up on the wall in the kitchen above the gas boiler (about 8 feet above floor level)! I am looking for something at ground level with a stopcock on it and a hose attachment, but so far with no success. Where is it likely to be??? Some of the pipes are routed under the floorboards. Could it have been located under the floor somewhere?
--
Walt Davidson Email: g3nyy @despammed.com

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On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 19:02:05 +0100, Walt Davidson

It's possible, but then you would be looking for an access cover or something if the installation was done properly.
Otherwise it will be a case of drain as much as you can by the high level drain, and then the rest by laboriously draining at a convenient radiator into a container. I'm sure you're read that sludgy water stains.
You can then fit a drain cock, or replace a radiator valve with one that has a drain built in.
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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wrote:

You could avoid some / much of the the mess as follows:
Use the drain as Andy suggests to clear the water above the boiler. Don't forget to either turn off the water to the header tank or tie up the ballcock.
Close off all the radiators with both lockshield valves.
You've now got a minimal quanity of water to cope with. You can probably do a controlled drain by removing a lockshield coupling or possibly use pipe freezer (you can hire these). Then cut the pipe at a convenient spot, insert drain valve, reconnect, turn rads back on. A bit of work but minimal mess and not as involved as it sounds.
Refill, adding some flushing agent, bleed, leave for recommended time (2 weeks if memory serves), drain, refill adding inhibitor.
--
Brian Reay
www.g8osn.org.uk
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He may have said 3 Port valve OR he may have been describing a 3 zone system using three seperate zone valves. Did he show you the offending item and did he expand at all on your post content? If you have a faulty 3 port valve it depends on the make as to the cost of the job since some have demountable power heads which can be changed without a drain down (and subsequent fill up again). If the fault is simply the drive motor (synchron) this is cheap and changeable for nearly all makes without draining but microswitch and other problems are maker dependant as above. Of course the valve may have failed mechanically which does suggest a complete valve change with draining. Now if he said 3 part zone this would be better described as an S plus zone system which uses two port valves not three . These are very simliar to the three port ones but the wiring and mechanicals are slightly different. Without further information any response must be a guess but I would suggest any complete valve renewal is with a Honeywell brand.
HTH
John
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the
system
did
it
zone
the
suggest
He has already established it is a Honeywell V4044C1288 (see his post at 11:33 on 24/09), which is a Diverter Valve.
--
Colin Reddish



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in message

The rest of the thread has now propagated through to my server thank you. From the description in another post of the lever being "loose" a common failing is indeed the motor and gear train seizing up but I wouldn't discount an electrical problem keeping it energised without checking first
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