(Non decorative) decking - advice/comments (long and detailed)..

Background: SWMBOs mobility has sadly deteriorated, and whilst inside our bungalow she is able to manage OK (grab handles *everywhere*), she has started to struggle a bit with getting in and out of the bungalow - front and rear.
The main problem is that the bungalow is slightly lower than the road, and within that aspect, is slightly raised with respect to the ground.
REAR: currently the patio door is 300mm (1') above the level of the ground outside. 3 years ago we had a platform with a ramp built with slabbing, however because of the limits of the area, the ramp is about 1in3 - far too much for unassisted hand powering. SWMBO was able to push herself up using her legs, but that's now not possible.
FRONT: The building has 2 front doors. About 260mm (10") of the ground. they are about 11.5m apart, and the "main" one has another 3.5m to the left, which runs towards the path to the pavement alongside the lounge window.
Currently both surfaces are slabbed.
My current thinking, is to use decking to provide a level platform out back from the patio door. Hopefully this is the easy one: - it's a straightforward rectangle, so 5.4mx3.2m = (c) 18m2. A quick google shows that there are sites that have calculators to give a total kit price (c. £500).
The front is a little more challenging. Currently there's a 1.2m paved path all around the bungalow. So basically I want to deck over it, with a slight slope from the main front door to ground level. That should be a drop of 260mm over 3500mm or 1in13.5 - (well within the recommended 1in12).
My main worry is creating the slope - will I end up having to cut joists, or are there subtler ways ?
Once I've got the requisite shopping list, I'll scour for reject/seconds, since appearance is secondary - especially as I may end up covering it with some sort of gripping felt.
So, is this a good/bad idea ? Pitfalls ?
Obviously if anyone has any suppliers they could suggest, I'm all ears :)
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I have decking. The main problem is that after a while it becomes VERY slippery in the wet, especially if there is any shading at all due to algea growth. (I'm talking ice rink slippery when wet.)
As the surface is ribbed, the only satifactory way of dealing with it is power washing and then some sort of chemical treatment. But in a few weeks the stuff is back.
Expensive to buy and if you were paying someone, expensive to install. I think you need planning permission too if it's more than a certain height. (Theoretically) Dunno what the lifespan is but after a while can look pretty shitty. A lot of the associated metal brackets sold are pretty crap (rust wise) so something to watch out for.
You could just build up the surrounding paths by importing aggregate and relaying your slabs. If you do this, you need to watch out for flooding/water getting into the house in heavy rain. Ie make provision for it to go elsewhere.
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On 11/01/2015 07:00, harryagain wrote:

It's no more slippery than slabs covered in the same amount of algae.

?????

Cheaper than slabs on uneven ground/slopes etc.

Anything over 30cm from the ground. Most people ignore this.

30 years if Tanalised.

--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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The Medway Handyman wrote:

I had a wooden ramp in a workplace situation leading up to a shipping container used for storage which became slippery and we covered it in chicken wire stapled down at very regular intervals. This turned out to be very effective and long lasting. Not pretty, but very very functional and kept the safety officer off my back.
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On 11/01/2015 12:02, Bob Minchin wrote:

There's any number of wire, plastic or rubber products which could be used to make it non-or-low-slip. As well as various bits-of-stone types of solution (e.g. glue sand or fine gravel).
And you don't have to lay the timber grooves-up.
--
Rod

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On 11/01/2015 07:00, harryagain wrote:

Do you have it upside down? The slots are there to stop warping and they go on the bottom. Some have small ribs on the top and they are quite effective at giving grip but they wear away. You replace them with wire mesh and it lasts for ages. Chicken mesh is cheap but the square stuff in stainless looks better.
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On 11/01/2015 16:32, Dennis@home wrote:

That's what our local council have used in wooded areas
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On Sunday, 11 January 2015 03:30:51 UTC, Jethro_uk wrote:

Alternative may be to get a blacksmith to weld up some ramps with handrails and expamet surfaces or buy a proprietary ramp system.
Local authority Occupational Therapists may be able to assist and in the past there were grants available for adaptation
http://www.easi-access.co.uk/products/modular-metal-ramp-system.html
Owain
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On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 16:34:09 +0000, Jethro_uk wrote:

Our deck doesn't use "decking".
We saw another property with an attractive wooden deck made out of more robust timber and liked it, so we used 9 * 2s and so far it seems fine. A bit of cupping before we treated it with wood stain but so far pretty good.
Supported on timber bearers bedded on concrete ridges on MOT. Whole thing is about 9" from the top of the MOT to the top of the deck.
If you want a gently sloping beck at the front, then I assume you would go about it the same way that you constructed a sloping roof, using triangular profile 'slips' to create the fall. Equally you could just slope the joists. This does mean the decking needs to run parallel to the house front. Umm...are you looking to slope across the front? That would be easier as you just vary the depth of MOT+concrete under the bearers to get a uniform slope. Now considering that you would need the bearers at a slight angle side to side to meet flush with the decking underside or a taper on the top.
How about doing the front ramp in poured concrete? Quick, all it needs is shuttering, easy to lay with a "mix on site" service, and you can ridge the surface before it goes off to provide plenty of grip. Wood along the external side to make it "prettier" and probably ventilation gap on the house side to avoid compromising the DPC and any under floor ventilation.
Rear decking sounds fine - we love ours. I agree with others that the ridges on "decking" planks are the work of the devil - they soon get slippy and are hell to clean.
Cheers
Dave R
--
Windows 8.1 on PCSpecialist box

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On Sun, 11 Jan 2015 05:10:30 -0800, spuorgelgoog wrote:

It is an alternative, granted. However, it involves finding someone to do the work, falls at the first hurdle.

There were lots of things in the past. But present day, the official answer is to whistle. We did have an OT assessment, but like other assessments we've had in the past 3 years it was just an exercise in telling us how we could spend our money[1]. They can only do it the "official" way, which involves nearly 100m or ramps in 5 sections with a level platform at each end. (I'm sure you've seen the photos).

Tx.
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On Monday, 12 January 2015 10:39:05 UTC, Jethro_uk wrote:

Unless you have a welding machine yourself :-)

Like this one courtesy of West Dunbartonshire Council:
http://www.brotherwood.com/default/cache/file/B39AA1A3-AC4B-4C04-8E6CFCF6B9844EE7.jpg
Owain
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2015 13:16:52 +0000, David wrote:

Too permanent and feature-altering.

Well the "non decorative" imperative means I'm happy to cover it in chicken wire, grippy felt or anything else ;). The aim is to provide SWMBO with a level access from inside to outside, so she can (a) enjoy the garden and (b) (in summer) hang washing out.

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