Lost post



Threaded bar, washers nuts and a little fiddly application. Drop bar down seat post, slip washers onto bar, attach nut and use to pull the post out. Use a socket from a socket set as a shim at the top and wind the bar out.
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Clint Sharp

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writes

Am I missing something here, lets give some suggested dimensions;
Tube to be removed : i/d dia' = 23mm (o/d = 25mm) Outer fixed tube : i/d = 25.5mm
So the washer can't be any wider than 23mm o/d, how can that but up and remove the tube when the washer would need to be (at least) 23.2mm o/d [1] but then if it was it could not fit down the 25mm i/d..... As I said, errrr?
[1] that still only gives a 1mm to pull against
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<snip>
Oops! that should have read ...but then if it was it could not fit down the *23mm* i/d.....
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Ahh, I see, I meant attach the washers after you dropped the bar down by fiddling them onto the bar in the crank housing. Probably my bad, it was late.

--
Clint Sharp

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:Jerry: wrote:

I have been pondering this problem for quite a while and you, as well as other posters, have missed one point.
A seat post, at both ends, is formed. Rounded to make the very last few mm of the end diameter smaller. This means that at the bottom of the seat post, there should be about 3 to 5 mm ,at each side, of grip for a slide hammer and a lipped bar It is done for a reason, so as to stop the seat post from scoring the frame tube. Usually the frame damages the seat post. No problem as the seat post can be replaced quite easily and cheaply
Get a rawl bolt that will just pass through the new post and a corresponding piece of screwed rod to match the thread. Remove the bolt from the rawl bolt and screw in the threaded rod. Hold the top of the rawl bolt and tighten the rod until the whole assembly will not pass through the seat post. Back it off until it does (ensure that the items can be screwed in and out with the slightest effort). Insert the threaded bar and rawl bolt and bring it back up the tube until you can get the top of it to interfere with the lower end of the seat post. Push side ways lightly Rotate the threaded rod until you feel resistance and can't be extracted.
Find something that will fit on the threaded bar with a hole that does not exceed the diameter of the nut/washer that you will fit later and then put a nut and an optional washer on the bar Now slide hammer the seat post out. If the seat post stops coming out, hit the top end of the threaded bar and start again. If the extractor comes out without the seat post, just start again. It's your only chance.
Dave
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Originally posted to uk.rec.cycling:
http://groups.google.com/group/uk.rec.cycling/browse_frm/thread/9afe2c227be15805/de095d41c7e0fa9e#de095d41c7e0fa9e
I bought a bike for 15 then spent another 15 on a seat post the old one being hacked off and the residue left in the frame where it can not be easily convinced of the error of its ways.
I can't use the present post without cutting it down and don't want to cut it down. It's worth more than the bike at the moment.
The pedal crank housing prevent pushing the old piece out and it may have some rust or chrome peel or just dirt... whatever holding it in situ.
Anyone ever come across anything like this?
I'd use 12" of 22mm copper pipe slit down its length. Then scan the inside of the problem and apply some sort of cement glue to locations on the copper pipe outer surface to line up with 3 or 4 good areas of the stuck part. let the cement dry and twist and pull and curse like you have never cursed before. And depending on if you curse well enough, it'll shift.
Arthur
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I assume that you wish to remove the residue that is left in the frame. Put a hacksaw blade into a handle sold for that purpose. Cut two slots as deep as you can in the residue of the pipe. Hit it with a cold chisel until it splits and comes out.
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Originally posted to uk.rec.cycling:
http://groups.google.com/group/uk.rec.cycling/browse_frm/thread/9afe2c227be15805/de095d41c7e0fa9e#de095d41c7e0fa9e
I bought a bike for 15 then spent another 15 on a seat post the old one being hacked off and the residue left in the frame where it can not be easily convinced of the error of its ways.
I can't use the present post without cutting it down and don't want to cut it down. It's worth more than the bike at the moment.
The pedal crank housing prevent pushing the old piece out and it may have some rust or chrome peel or just dirt... whatever holding it in situ.
Anyone ever come across anything like this?
You've had a few suggestions, some of which like an adjustable reamer are non starters. I assume nothing is sticking up out of the outer tube or you would have tried gripping that bit already. Easiest way is probably to grind (dremel with a little burr) or saw a couple of slots in the top inch of the inner tube then with a small cold chisel or screwdriver fold them in to create a flap you can grip with a vice grip. Then tap that up with a hammer and it should all come out.
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Dave Baker wrote:

http://groups.google.com/group/uk.rec.cycling/browse_frm/thread/9afe2c227be15805/de095d41c7e0fa9e#de095d41c7e0fa9e
That's what I did in a similar situation so long ago I can't remember what it was...on!
I remember driving a thin screwdriver between inner and outer tubes to 'pop' the inner away from the outer, and then using wire cutters and chisels to split and lever it all away.
ISTR the outer was a bit buggered.
Hang on tho. This is a bike saddle right?
So undo the retaining bolt completely, and there is a slot at least partway in the outer tube that can be levered apart a bit, or have a bit of hacksaw inserted at an angle to start splitting the inner tube?
Copious amounts of WD40 should help too.
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encounter every few months........ solution is to cut the tube off level with top of frame and then use a hacksaw blade/padsaw to go down inside the tube on 2 oppsite sides, cutting it into 2 pieces...... try not to slice into the frame! Once it's cut, you can knock a screwdrive or whatever down side of tube and they should come loose. Must admit, I've only done it with the alloy seatpins but should work just as well with the steel..... just takes longer!
Geoff
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