Kitchen under cabinet lighting

The extension kitchen fitting proceeds apace and I am now pondering lamps to go under the cupboards and illuminate the worktops.
16 years ago, I used 8 Watt miniature fluorescents and I see they are still available.
For a lot more money I can get LED strips with an unspecified light output.
What do others use?
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/01/13 09:43, Tim Lamb wrote:

I bought something similar to these from TLC:
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Main_Index/Lighting_Menu_Index/Lighting_Kitchen_Index/Kitchen_and_Under_Cupboard/index.html
The type I bought were very reasonably priced, and used T5 tubes with electronic ballasts. A few have proved unreliable (which may be why TLC seem to have changed to this product), but were otherwise fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm finding the tubes for these seem to not last very long recently. They just seem to go dim for no apparent reason after a while. Brian
--
Brian Gaff....Note, this account does not accept Bcc: email.
graphics are great, but the blind can't hear them
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm still using the originals!
How can you tell they are dim or is this any housewife's plea for more light?
The response so far is not exactly a ringing endorsement of LED technology. I may have a look at the B+Q lighting display on my way to Screwfix for the fluorescents.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Screwfix are only likely to have the most basic of units. Florries are available in a variety of colour temperatures (from a specialist) so you don't have to put up with white or warm white. Decent ballasts will also repay the investment with long life and higher efficiency.
--
*No hand signals. Driver on Viagra*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been very pleased with the LEDs that I have installed so far. These are mostly 3W units which are roughly equivalent to 20-30W incandescents. Unlike the 12W CFLs that they replaced, the LEDs really do give a decent light output.
The only problem so far has been replacing 12V halogens with LED. The transformers/SMPSUs can't cope with a load as low as 15W, so to make it all work properly I have had to use a ratio of 3xLED to 2xhalogen. At least this reduces consumption from 150W to 70W which is worthwhile. When I get a round tuit I will replace the transformers, or re-wire to use 1x transformer for 20x fittings which will get us back to the "comfort zone" for the transformer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK. I could interrupt the circuit, fit the transformer and wire the lamps to the rest of the loop.

I'll have a look at the displays. They look an expensive solution from the catalogues.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Certainly not cheap, but worth it IMO for the instant-on response, unlike the CFL flicker and slow warm-up. Shopping around can get prices down. I have been using Peritus LEDs. I bough these from a supplier listed as being in Hull, but I suspect that they are an asian supplier with a shipper in Hull.
http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Ivys-shop
You can also buy direct from Peritus:
http://www.peritus-electronics.com /
But I found them about 60p to 1/unit more expensive.
The MR16 21SMD bulbs cost me 5.99 each, GU10s about the same, R50s about 5. All for SMD 3.5W bulbs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/01/2013 09:43, Tim Lamb wrote:

As an experiment, I have put up a 3.8W LED strip (1100mm) under one cupboard - cost around 11. Very pleasant though, maybe, not as bright as a tube? Thinking about which way to go for the whole lot now - but 100% will be LED of some sort.
--
Rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wanted to go for LED strips as they would provide even lighting but SWMBO has insisted that (LED) spots provide a varied more homely look.
Of course, I know she is right. ;-)
--
Simon

12) The Second Rule of Expectations
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need a "his" and "hers" switch, one for mood lighting, and the other for functional lighting when you actually want to use the kitchen for food preparation, seriously. This is pretty much what I always do for kitchen lighting.
Switch the task lighting (under cupboard) separately from the main room lighting, although you don't want a scheme which requires running around the room flicking 6 different switches, just to turn off all the lights.
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi there thanks all for useful discussion. I have been also looking for some satisfactory information regarding this which I have already got from here!
--
anisagimran

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A full length fluorescent? Why use several when one is cheaper?
--
*If you don't like the news, go out and make some.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A discontinuous run of cupboards. The main kitchen has 5. Also a slight nervousness about safety. The small ones tuck away neatly and not somewhere the food processor etc. is likely to reach.

--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 13, 2013 11:16:07 AM UTC, Tim Lamb wrote:

One fl tube has less points where its live than several tubes, requires a fraction the number of replacement tubes over time, and fits the same under cupboard spaces small tubes do. It costs less to fit, less in electricity and less in tubes. From your feedback I wonder if you've thought through how a 1 tube system works.
Most kitchens have 1, 2 or 3 cupboard runs. If your 5 units are all spaced apart then of course its not an option.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@care2.com writes

The small tube fittings are shrouded so electrical safety not really an issue. I was thinking more about glass shards in food and the consequent abuse that would come my way:-)
3 Isolated cupboards only.
I was rather hoping someone would have recent experience of LED sets intended for this purpose.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Tubes are actually quite strong - and would normally be protected by a plinth of some sort anyway - unless you want them shining in your eyes.

So three tubes - they come in various lengths.

Ah. You actually want to use those excuses for lights?
--
*In some places, C:\ is the root of all directories *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So was I when I read the subject line.
I don't know about the larger fluorescents, but I bought T4 size ones to do a similar job to yours, Tim, and am looking to replace as they have a short life and are therefore uneconomic. I've replaced one light with 10w 12v halogens from Ikea but the holders were a real pain to fit.
Three of the ceiling (low) downlighter bulbs have been replaced with LED's with approval !
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In message

Oh well! I'm always slightly in front of the curve... I was too early to go for a pressurised hot tank in our flat, too early to fit a heat bank for our farmhouse conversion and now LEDs are not quite ready for what seems an ideal application.
I expect I'll end up fitting 8W and 16W fluorescents. Our main kitchen has a raft of recessed circular twin fluorescents which have never really given enough light. I think the wiring is daisy chained so might lend itself to a future LED conversion. I have resisted halogens on lamp life and appearance grounds.
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 13, 2013 9:43:27 AM UTC, Tim Lamb wrote:

If you look up the lifetime and output of your tubes you've got a base for comparison. Fluorescent is usually a good bit better than LED for unfocussed light, but the miniatures are at the low end of fl efficacy.
A single 5' T8 tube on a dimming ballast (per run of cupboard) would get you much better energy efficiency and run cost, much more choice re tube types, and wide ranging light output.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.