Flat pack wardobe: wobbles

Advice please for making an MFI flat-plack wardrobe more stable?
The pine wardrobe was previously in my old house; I had to dismantle it to get it out of the door when I moved out. The wardrobe has been in storage for 2 years and last night I tried to rebuild it.
I think a couple of the panels have warped slightly. The wardrobe "wobbles" when you walk past it!
Obviously this "wobble" will lessen when I fix in the back panel and put clothes in the 'robe. But I also thought about fixing 4 angle brackets at the base corners.
Any ideas?
Thanks Bruce
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Most of the large DIY outlets, and small local hardware stores, sell flat metal corner plates that screw flat against the corners on the back of the wardrobe.
Like these: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/lrgimg_popup.jsp ;jsessionid=KELHVEUOBA233CJO2C3CJ0Q?productId954&tsT664
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bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com writes

I'd probably use some ply wood triangles fixed on the back across the corners
--
Chris French, Leeds

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bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

It will probably get most of it's rigidigy from the back panel, fix that back first and see how you get on ...
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Bruce, You have answered your own question i.e. It will lessen this wobble I put the back on. For a structure to be stiff(strong ) It has to have a odd number of struts(sides) you have top sides (4) and a back (1) add them to gether = 5
If you try and move it with out fixing the back the joints will be damaged ( possibly are now) so put the back on and then if necessary use angle brackets to strengthen the corners. MikeS
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put
and a

Right you are, Mike. I'll nail the back panel on first and see how stable it looks.
Bruce
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It probably won't hurt, but you'll find much of the rigidity comes from the back panel.
Jc.
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Josey wrote:

I found that practically ALL the rigidity came from the back panel with my MFI pine wardobe. If the back wasn't in, I could push one corner and wobble it a lot. If pushed hard, I could probably push it flat, splitting the wood where the metal lock pins screw in. When the back is in, no wobble at all and far stronger (can lean up it from the side etc without risk of collapse!).
David
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with my

wobble
the wood

at all

Just one point. I have yet to hang the front doors on the wardrobe. Do you suggest I do this *after* nailing on the back panel?
I don't have the original assembly instructions, but seem to recall that the back went on last when I originally assembled it.
Bruce
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On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 08:59:35 UTC, bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

We had this problem. The removal men said that a lot of flat pack stuff can't really support its own weight, and has problems after being moved, even without the time lag you state.

It depends on the panels that are warped. I used some bolt together corner joints to pull bits together (in one case, I fixed a shelf in place, instead of resting it on the usual little pegs, to provide some cross bracing and to pull a slightly bowed side back into line).
--
Bob Eager
begin a new life...dump Windows!
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Easy Peazey! Get two simple angle brackets and fix the two top rear corners to the wall behind. The bugger can't wobble then!

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Easy Peazey! Get two simple angle brackets and fix the two top rear corners to the wall behind. The bugger can't wobble then!
Exactly! Bolt the bugger to the wall. Done it many a time. Get it square, fix to wall, then put the doors on - you only have to adjust the hinges once!
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On 17 Jan 2005 00:59:35 -0800, bruce snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

The back panel basicall holds the whole thing together. Secure it and your problems will (should) go away.
sPoNiX
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OP here. Yes, fitting the back panel does stiffen the whole thing up.
Now another question: What's the best approach for fitting the door hinges? They are typical MFI hinges where there are two screws: you slide the hinge over one, tighten/loosen it and then tighten/loosen the other. But in what combination I can't really tell.
I've fastened the doors on, but they don't close smoothly. What's the secret?
Bruce
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They are typical MFI hinges where there are two screws: you slide the hinge over one, tighten/loosen it and then tighten/loosen the other. But in what combination I can't really tell.
I've fastened the doors on, but they don't close smoothly. What's the secret?
Don't even look at the hinges until the whole thing is square. When and only when it is square can you adjust hinges properly.
The bigger screw is the locking screw. Loosen that and the smaller screw adjusted in or out changes the alignment of the doors. If the gap between them is too big, adjust the screws both sides by turning them out (undoing them) and vica versa.
Sometimes the hinges have up & down adjustment on the two screws that hold the hinge plate to the carcass.
Finally the bigger screw is in a slot. This allows adjustment forward & back to get the doors flush. But don't bother unless the whole thing is square!
Dave
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Dave wrote:

the
gap
forward
Thanks, Dave. Doesn't sound exactly like mine -- mine has a largeish locking screw + a smaller screw which the hinge slides over. I guess the best process is to slide the hinge over the smaller screw, tighten that one when happy, then tighten the locking screw. Anyone seen any MFI assembly instructions on the web?
Thanks Bruce
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No, but I've probably got some in the garage, I can scan the relevant bit and email.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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