delayed

I expect nobody wants to touch them in case they carry the virus. Its interesting as recent info suggests its about as contagious as flu, but like flu the people who do not just get a bad cold are those with other issues affecting their breathing or immune system.
I just wonder how many of the other viruses we see each year are in fact new and just because they have not started in a very precise area, have just been allowed to run their course? Certainly several recently developed anti virals seem to help with people who are badly affected by this one as they block the common machinery needed to replicate the rna of the virus and scramble it. The danger is that there could be side effects due to the action producing toxins etc. Still I'd rather be a bit ill than dead. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa 2)
On Wed, 12 Feb 2020 14:52:30 -0000
You can't be 100% sure of that until you've given dead a go.
Reply to
Tom
Well, I personally feel that my original statement is probably going to be true, ie its nowhere near as infectious as Measles or chicken pox, probably as bad as your average winter virus, and for most normal people, not dangerous, but the problem is you do not know if you are one of those for whom it is dangerous, but we do not know that for sure about all the viruses circulating anyway. OK its right to be careful, but if we did this for every new virus each year, then it would cripple all economies. In the main here we are attempting to keep it out of countries where there is poor healthcare infrastructure, since once it is established there, it is inevitable it will spread. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa 2)
So how come the doctor who discovered it died ( Li Wenliang).
The coronavirus mortality rate appears to be several orders of magnitude greater than common flu.
Reply to
Pancho
Is it or have we generally built up an immunity to the types of flu seen over the past few decades. When flu morphs into a different strain in future we could see the death toll seen 100 years ago.
Reply to
alan_m
That is why I said "common" flu.
But yes, flu could mutate into an especially severe form. Hopefully modern medicine would be better at handling a modern version of Spanish flu. I see they quote about 6 months to develop a new flu vaccine. I'm not sure how difficult it will be to develop a vaccine for nCoV. Hopefully if we can delay it arriving here for a year or two, we will be OK. Although, we still don't have an AIDS vaccine after 35 years.
Reply to
Pancho
I read a report suggesting they don't work very well. I think you would be better off with one of these:

Best be quick.
Reply to
Pancho
Mortality of seasonal flu varies greatly but averages about 1%. Covid-19 seems to have mortality of 2 to 3 %. SARS was around 10%.
The big problem with Covid-19 is that some one infected becomes contagious possibly days before they show any symptoms. So it gets passed on before the infected person self isolates or presents and gets sent to an isolation unit.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
Better at handling the secondary effects like pneumonia with anti-biotics. Not sure modern medicine would be any better at dealing with the virus itself. Probably depends on when and where it mutates and how similar it is to something we already have a vaccine for. The seasonal flu jab, is cocktail of vaccines for the three strains that they think might be ones circulating in the coming winter.
The WHO are going for around 18 months... The problem is very little money is likely to be made, so "big pharma" aren't really interested. There is also the risk you spend millions on developing a vaccine only to have good containment cause it to die out.
The next few days to a week might be interesting...
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
One of the buyers in my old employer told me one of his Chinese suppliers has asked if he can source 1000 masks in the uk for them!
Furthermore he is expecting massive shortages of Chinese manufactured product to start appearing next month. They are already refusing to discount bulk purchases from uk stocks as he expects Chinese prices to rise appreciably.
Mike
Reply to
Muddymike
The point is the masks we see here are for stopping stuff getting in not out, and its the out bit we need to stop those with anything from giving it to everyone else, whatever it is. I wonder if anyone has done any research on this in the winter season, to see if it brings down the number of colds an flue. I'd bye more wary of measles than this virus at the moment, I think. That is possibly one of the most infectious things about. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Bed)
AIUI the purpose of surgical mask is to stop stuff getting *out*.
I did read about this earlier and there was scepticism about surgical masks providing a benefit against a viral epidemic, I'm not quite sure what that means.
I was only half taking the piss with my earlier response to Judith, suggesting a screwfix dusk mask. Dusk masks and, possibly even better, bicycle masks are designed to stop stuff getting in. So if you are interested in protecting yourself get one of them. Reasonable masks can be purchased for £20-30. These masks are unpleasant to wear, as moisture builds up.
Reply to
Pancho

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