Can I fit a bath waste trap to my kitchen sink in order to have more space in the cabinet?

A shallow trap would leave room for a shelf and bin beneath. Any reason why not?
Thanks,
Peter
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Sink waste traps often have a removeable element which can be unscrewed so at to physically scoop out any blockage. A quick google image search suggests bath waste "traps" typically don't offer this feature.
michael adams
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What about using a bottle trap?
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I think they used to inthe days of copper waste fittings
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Some do, but the problem is if he fits a shelf close to it, how on earth will he get the gunk out of it?
I unfortunately have a different problem the trap on my sink is plastic and has what I can only describe as a large cup shaped bit screwed on over both in and out of the trap. The thing has not been off for years and I have a nasty feeling it never will again. I can't budge it by hand though it has no way of gripping it except for a kind of few raised ridges. I think if I used a strap wrench on it I'd break it off at the plug hole or the pipe that goes out through the wall! Brian
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On 04/06/2018 18:56, michael adams wrote:

Yes but as long as you can remove the (shallow) trap easily enough if it becomes blocked, why not? In the "old days" of lead, the screwed fitting at the lowest point was the thing you could be reasonably certain of being able to get undone, with the attachment to the sink and the waste pipe quite possibly being set solid with boss white or whatever.
With modern fittings, it should be easy enough to disconnect a bath type trap at each end. Especially if you have a wet and dry vacuum cleaner ready to mop up the leaks.
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On 04/06/18 18:56, michael adams wrote:

shwoer ones do but often suck dry leaving pongs

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On 04/06/2018 18:02, Peter wrote:

There is a far easier solution for this. I have done this for my kitchen sink, my utility room sink and even the en-suite room sink.
I get my waste traps from FRANKE which allows you to put the waste traps at the BACK or the SIDE of the cupboard so one can reclaim the room within the cabinet as its no longer in the middle.
In our case, the kitchen sink cabinet is used for our recycling bins.
The utility sink cupboard has very tall washing powder containers within it.
The en-suite cupboard is in fact built over the sloping stairs ceiling so it has staircase shelving within so the waste trap is at the side of the cupboard. There was no room for a conventional U trap or I would have had to cut through the stairs ceiling. I did have to use a 32mm to 40mm ring adapter though with LS-X.
Google for Franke Siphon 1 or siphon II oe Siphon III
or go straight here:
https://www.franke.com/gb/en/ks/products/kitchen-solutions/plumbing-kits/112-0052-536_detail.html
ALthough it appears to be for a kitchen sink with multiple bowls and outlets for dishwashers and washing machines, these can be blanked off with the supplied blanking discs.
The kit has a long "elbow" which you attach to the sink waste and direct the water to where you want the 'U' trap to go.
Hope you find this helpful,
Stephen.
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On 04/06/2018 21:09, Stephen wrote:

Thanks for that - good idea, some prices/pics:
https://www.plumbworld.co.uk/kitchen-sink-wastes-19567-0000
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On Tuesday, 5 June 2018 08:33:54 UTC+1, RJH wrote:

And (rather surprisingly!) B&Q do similar kits for half the price, off-the-shelf. I successfully used a B&Q one in my kitchen 10 years ago:
https://www.diy.com/departments/pack-b-1-5/-2-bowl-waste-overflow-plumbing-kit/1306786_BQ.prd
https://www.diy.com/departments/floplast-double-bowl-sink-waste-kit-dia-40mm/53511_BQ.prd
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On 04/06/18 21:09, Stephen wrote:

Good point - the OP could fit a running trap (inline with the pipework) downstream of the sink and put a simple bend on the sink outlet.
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Not sure about the horizontal pipe - it will get smelly.
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On 04/06/18 18:02, Peter wrote:

All that matters is you have the correct depth of water seal.
If you google for Building Approved Documents and look for the one detailing drainage, that will tell you.
But an alternative solution would be a bottle trap that could be unscrewed and dropped through a hole in the shelf.
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On Monday, 4 June 2018 18:02:28 UTC+1, Peter wrote:

Thanks for useful info. Seems like there are at least three possible ways around it.
Peter
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On Wed, 6 Jun 2018 03:22:39 -0700 (PDT), Peter wrote:

Four? http://hepvo.com/ I fitted one to a 1½ sink taht would have had 2 traps (why?!) and more or less occupied all of the easily reachable top shelf. Had to start forward, go through 180 deg. and put one end of the trap just into the wall. It freed up almost all of the shelf and worked well for about 8 years - then frequent v. hot fat...! A replacement is still OK.
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