3 port valve and UFH - balancing necessary?

https://www.heatingcontrolsonline.co.uk/underfloor-heating-c-44.html/wet-underfloor-heating-c-44_49.html/single-room-units.html/single-room-underfloor-heating-set-p-944.html
has a 3 port valve.
As far as I understand, if the UFH is up to temperature, the 3 port valve will find a position such that 100% of the water flows around teh UFH circuit and none will be taken or returned to the CH primary circuit?
If that is so, then I don't need to balance the main CH connection to this - it will self regulate?
Cheers :)
Tim
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On 13/11/2017 11:38, Tim Watts wrote:

How is the connection to the main CH system controlled? The mixing valve will control the temperature of the water flowing through the UFH pipes but it won't control the room temperature.
My single room UFH has its own zone within an S-Plan+ system. A wireless room stat controls the zone valve *and* the UFH's pump. The UFH is only fed from the boiler and circulated by its own pump when the *room* is calling for heat. I don't have any balancing between this zone and the main radiator zone or the HW zone - but the system seems to work ok regardless of how many zones are calling for heat at any given moment.
Not sure whether this answers your question?
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Cheers,
Roger
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On 13/11/17 14:11, Roger Mills wrote:

Hi Roger,
Permanent connection. The UFH blender pump will be controlled by timer/stat on its own zone[1]
[1] One option is to control the conservatory on a full own zone. The shower room is only about 200W of potential heating due to tiny floor area. I might run this opportunistically - ie the pump will energise whenever the boiler has call for heat. If I were smart I might have a simple stat to cut the pump when the floor temperature is up.

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On 13/11/2017 14:57, Tim Watts wrote:

But it's not the floor temperature which matters - it's the temperature of the room which is heated by the floor which is important. If the room is hot enough, you can allow the floor to cool a bit - a bit like turning radiators on and off, but with a long time cycle.
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Roger
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On 14/11/17 11:08, Roger Mills wrote:

I'm treating a 3m2 floor with UFH like a towel rail - it could run flat out (200-300W max) and not make a huge impact (and we have the option to run this cooler, eg 35C).
It's main function is comfort and drying the floor - it doesn't seem worth bothering to actually control it :)
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Tim Watts wrote:

Based on no experience at all as I have never played with UFH (!!), I'd have thought it desirable to balance the UFH with respect to the radiator loops. You don't want the flow through the UFH loop to rob the rads of heat when the demand is high - such as at switch on or very cold weather when perhaps the conservatory losses are high and keeping the house warm is a priority.
Bob
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