3-D printer. What to print?

I quite fancy, for a bit of fun, building one of these sub-£100 3-D printer kits.
https://tinyurl.com/yc3rcvqo
https://tinyurl.com/z8hnvh5
My wife (I'm careful, she's mean) wants to know what use it is. Looking on the internet they mostly seem to be used to print improved parts for the 3-D printer so that, presumably, you can 3-D print even better parts. Needless to say this isn't going to work with my wife (I'm rational, she's awkward).
Any suggestions?
Another Dave
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Another Dave wrote:

First one looks a more rickety design that usual (only one support in each axis).

Surely a small pink spacerocket or some armour-plating for your cat, as per the advert, will be sufficient to win her over?
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On 08/12/17 12:31, Andy Burns wrote:

Apparently not. It contains some metal rather than just acrylic. Besides, if it were perfect, I'd have no enhanced parts to print ...
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On 08/12/17 12:21, Another Dave wrote:

Erm...
I've just broken some 40 year old plastic door handles on a cupboard. Could print identical looking replacements.
I need a spacer to raise the back of a turntable tonearm to match taller cartridges.
I have an old fluke DMM with a broken slide switch. I have a casio music keyboard with a broken key.
I've seen a screw on device that aerates water from the tap, reducing consumption when washing hands...
.
.
New Christmas fairy for the top of the tree?
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On Fri, 8 Dec 2017 14:10:50 +0000, Adrian Caspersz

Daughters ex has asked me if I could print some large chainsaw chain cutter models for show_and_tell for his class (he used to be able to buy them from Oregon).
As has been mentioned elsewhere, I can do so easily, subject to the size required and the suitability to 3D printing etc but he would have to either get the 3D model file off them Oregon (if they have such and are willing etc) or get the vernier calipers out and Sketchup on a PC and get drawing. ;-)
But the list of 'handy things' that I often couldn't just buy that I have printed is too long to mention.
The last was some little plastic feet to allow daughter to raise her wooden pet rabbit hutch / run to stand just off the concrete to stop it sitting in water (and going rotten quickly) but low enough to not let sawdust and stuff to bow out.
She's just bought a multi-panel steel framed run that comes powered coated but I fear will lose it's coating underneath (and go rusty etc) if dragged over the concrete. So, I intend to design and print some clip on feet, two per panel to both keep it just off the ground and therefore stop it getting damaged (like the concrete blocks you see on temporary fencing round building sites etc). It won't matter if the rabbits chew them as I generally use PLA and I believe that's made from corn starch or some such?
The next job for the spring is to design and print a square mast foot for the folding / sailing dinghy and a matching mast step insert to help prevent the mast rotating under use / sail.
The biggest thing I've designed and printed was a 90 Deg corner bracket to allow me to mount an outside light designed to go on a flat wall on the corner of a wall instead (and so lighting down both sides). I couldn't find a corner lamp fitting with the features I needed in the price range I wanted.
Oh, and I printed all the plastic parts to build two more printers. ;-)
Even after a couple of years using the 3D printer (after building it), I still get a buzz out of thinking of something in the morning and having it in my hand as a solid plastic object a couple of hours later. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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My car club had some no longer available plastic brackets made up. Since they do break in time, fair to assume the originals only just adequate. The printed ones lasted five minutes in use.
So I'd be wary of assuming something printed is as strong as a part made by traditional means, if identical dimensions.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2017 14:57:55 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

But sometimes printed things can be (much) stronger than the things they are replacing.
A neighbour has a big 'D cell' Maglight type torch and it came with a shoulder strap held onto the torch by two big plastic clamp / loops.
He had one replaced under warranty and then the other one failed and he was quoted £15 inc to get a replacement.
It was a simple design / print job so I made one from the dimensions and (broken) sample he gave., but it was a bit too small (his dimensions were out) so his son tried to break the replacement (as it was of no use).
He is a big lad and only after quite a bit of bending and twisting was he able to break it and the replacements have been on the torch for nearly two years now with no sign of breaking.
So, a few things come into play when considering printing 'replacement' items:
1) Is it easy to do with a straight 3D printer (without a dual extruder printer and 'lost' support filament etc)?
2) Are you using the most suitable plastic (eg, it can get very hot in a car in the summer and some of these filament materials have a fairly low melting point (and still soften below that))?
3) Is the printer setup and printing properly?
4) Are you printing the job with the printing 'grain' in mind re strength?
On that last one, I have had print jobs fall apart because the extruder was too cold and the layers not bonding to each other etc.
On the whole though, one of the things most people say when you show them a print job for the first time is 'how strong it is'. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 08/12/2017 14:57, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Print the part.. make a silicon mould.. cast the part with glass filled epoxy.. job done.
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To be honest I made replacements for my own car from ally sheet. It was others who wanted a simple new ready made part to replace them. They would certainly be strong enough made from glass fibre.
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2017 14:57:55 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

Depends on the material used. PLA (Polylactic Acid) is the most commonly and most easily used plastic in 3D printers but isn't the strongest. Polycarbonate can also be used in most printers (although it makes a nasty smell and is a bit fiddly to get right) and parts printed in that are as strong as any Polycarbonate item. Nylon is also now available.
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'We' had the job done professionally. But of course dunno if the best material for the job was used - it's something you'd expect the people making them to know. They weren't cheap, either.
The originals were made of the common sort of plastic you find in cars. Slightly flexible.
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On Sat, 09 Dec 2017 15:34:13 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

ABS, also available for 3D printing. Another neat trick you can do which is used a lot by model train enthusiasts is a form of lost plastic (rather than wax) casting. Make a positive from PLA and put it in casting sand as you would wax. Molten metal poured in will melt the PLA as if it was wax leaving you with a metal casting.
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On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 10:31:14 +0000

I thought with lost wax you baked the mould to melt/burn out the former before pouring the metal.
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On 11/12/2017 23:17, Rob Morley wrote:

Even using a sacrificial 3D print, it normal to burn out the PLA in a firing before the pour. That process would normally use a ceramic shell, though some plasters can be used.
Lost foam is the normal process where the sacrificial material is left in situ in a sand mould and burnt out during the pour.
Leaving a solid plastic object in a mould, while pouring hot metal into it, is a recipe for disaster.
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There are people successfully pouring metal in to burn/melt out a sacrifical print in place. For example: https://www.tctmagazine.com/tctblogs/daniel-oconnors-blog/3D-printings-role-in-the-rise-of-diy-casting/ "I knew a solid plastic print would not burn out as readily as a foam pattern, so I thought that if a mould cavity was mostly a void (creating a fill density roughly similar to foam - or ideally even less dense), and giving the metal a large enough volume to fill, it should vaporize the relatively thin shell of plastic and work about the same as the Lost Foam process.
That indeed turned out to be the case. Well mostly the case. It seems whatever plastic doesn't immediately vaporize is more buoyant so it just floats to the top."
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On 12/12/2017 14:14, Alan Braggins wrote:

That's interesting, sort of replicating the lost foam process, minimising the amount of material needed to be burnt out.
The only issue is the time taken to print a part, obviously the smaller the better.
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On 11/12/2017 23:38, Fredxx wrote:

You wouldn't use a solid plastic object though. A 3D print with a 5% fill would be enough for most moulds and that is pretty low. You are only talking about a shell about 0.6mm thick with a few percent fill to stiffen it.
I wouldn't stand too close though as the air in it might well expand rather quickly and the fumes are unpleasant/dangerous.
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Especially with a cheap home use one. With more expensive ones, which might mean using a service bureau, there are stronger options like filaments with carbon fibre embedded: https://makezine.com/2015/01/15/3d-printed-carbon-fiber-markforged/
(There's also selective laser sintering to 3D print metal parts.)
Alternatively, you can 3D print a wax pattern to be used for traditional investment casting. https://makezine.com/2015/02/02/new-3d-printer-filament-brings-lost-wax-casting-to-your-desktop/
Or print moulds for a desktop molding machine: http://www.allforge.org/
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On 11/12/2017 17:09, Alan Braggins wrote:

I can print carbon filed plastics on my sub £200 printer. There isn't anything really special about doing it other than having an all metal hot end and a hardened nozzle to avoid wear.
The cheaper printers tend to use PTFE tubes as linings in the hot end which limits their temps to about 240C which isn't hot enough for some plastics. However you can buy all metal upgrades for a few pounds on ebay/amazon.

Or plastic on some machines. I expect whisky's machine is one of them.

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On Friday, 8 December 2017 14:10:56 UTC, Adrian Caspersz wrote:

D

Do you have any idea how much time and cost it will be to 'make' these hand les ?
I wouldn't bother I'd get some new handles.

That's what they all say it is ;-)
But honestly I wouldn't bother.
The time and effor envolved even if you do managed to be able to download t he part.

That is prooably the best reason for getting one, as long as you know that it;ll just be in one boring colour not very smooth, low detail and take 4 h ours+ to print.
But ti can be fun if you have nothjing to do for teh next few months but le arn the design software and how to use it.
It's a bit like making your own nuts and bolts.

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