1 in 5 living in Poverty in Britain — Government G ives £100 Million for Roads in AFRICA

A new report has revealed that a fifth of Britain’s population - equivalent to some 13 million people - are officially living in poverty. Almost simultaneously, the government has announced a gift of £100 million to “to rebuild southern Africa’s infrastructure after decades of neglect.”
According to an Oxfam report called “Close to Home — UK Poverty and the Economic Downturn,” life for the fifth of the UK’s population living in poverty is set to worsen because of the recession.
At the same time, Gareth Thomas, minister of state at the department for international development announced in Lusaka on Monday that Britain will be giving £100 million of taxpayers’ money to build a North-South corridor in Africa to try and rectify what he claims is the reason behind Africa’s plummeting share of world trade.
Mr Thomas said, “One of the reasons why Africa’s share of trade has dropped from six percent in the 1960s to one to two percent now is because of how long it takes to get goods to market. That’s because of the poor quality of infrastructure in the region.”
African governments themselves are responsible for the neglect, which has seen functional systems degrade into dilapidation in the decades since independence. Even major developments since then have declined in effectiveness, such as the Chinese-built Tazara railway from Zambia to Dar es Salaam, which now suffers from a shortage of rolling stock.
Meanwhile, the Oxfam report on poverty in Britain contained a poll which shows just four percent of adults think the government has done enough to help those who have lost their jobs.
The charity says the UK is becoming a nation of “Freds,” a concept it has created to sum up the plight of people it says are forgotten, ripped off, excluded and debt-ridden.
A report issued by the children’s charity Barnardo’s in Northern Ireland has warned that the health and welfare of children living in poverty is set to hit crisis point as the recession takes hold.
The charity is concerned more families will be forced to rely on loan sharks and will have to cut back on basics like heating to make ends meet.
Lynday Wilson, of Barnardo’s NI, said poor families faced a terrible strain.
“This is not a one-off for families struggling to get by. This is a constant cycle of deprivation they’re fighting against. But the pressure on parents, if only to keep their children warm, is harder than ever right now, with uncommonly cold weather, high fuel prices and growing numbers of parents becoming unemployed.”
The government defines poverty as having an income of 60 percent or less of the median — on this basis 13.2 million people in the UK live in poverty, 22 percent of the population.
Despite this dreadful state of affairs, it is clear that the government - in terms of foreign aid policies developed over decades by successive Tory and Labour regimes, clearly considers it more important to endlessly fund proven failed states in the Third World.
The time has come to put an end to the Labour and Tory parties’ ability to play Father Christmas with British tax money handouts to undeserving and ungrateful Third World nations.
The British National Party is the only party which unashamedly puts British people first. A BNP government will first ensure that poverty and deprivation are eradicated in Britain before any consideration can be given to foreign aid of any sort.
No more hoping for change, Now you can VOTE FOR IT!! www.bnp.org.uk
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Love Europe, Hate the EU wrote:

bizarre claim

bizarre definition

This is part of the problem, the notion that someone else ought to fix our problems for us. So many Brits dont seem to grow up.

what nonsense. It gets them airspace and donations though.

Cant people help theselves at all?

it would change things alright... the sort of change I would never want
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

What's the definition? If you can afford Sky TV?

So as the recession bites, and average income goes down, more people on Income Support will be "lifted" out of poverty. So a recession is good for poverty?

Or live within their means?

Hitler made some changes as well.
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Fred wrote:

A sane defintion might be the inability to afford the necessities in life. We dont have many in that position in Britain.
And no, keeping the whole house at 20C 24/7 is not a necessity.

a great way to help themselves :) I find it weird that so many dont do this. Debt, aka credit, makes people poorer, and its trivial to demonstrate.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

By their definition it is impossible to eliminate poverty. If through taxation and handouts everyone ended up with the same money then by their measure everyone would be in poverty.
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Broadback coughed up some electrons that declared:

It would help if "they" would stop introducing pointless regulations that make it just a little bit harder for people to set up and run a small business (especially trades, but also white collar work to some extent).
I'm thinking:
a) Waste disposal and WEEE bollocks. Why make it hard for a small tradesman to remove client waste - especially if it's a few bits of pipe, wiring and plaster. Make them pay by all means - but something simple, fair and prorata, with a cash option down every local tip. Weighbridge for very big loads (where available at tip) and a simple scale for small loads - eg a barrow load, a small van load etc).
b) Remove compulsory PAYE for small businesses (IR35 or whatever it is). Why make it really hard work to grow your one man business with a lad or lass assistant?
c) Move all the building regs that don't have to do with safety to a seperate section for new builds (and perhaps major, for some definition of major, extensions). If (for example, not that he would) Dave TMH wants to fit a replacement window, let him without requiring FENSA membership or a BNA.
Each of these may seem small in trivial in isolation, but added to the countless other regulations of little real benefit that I'm sure a poll of self employed tradesmen, service providers and farmers would reveal, it adds up to a depressingly persuasive disincentive to be bothered trying to better one's lot.
Bah.
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Yes I agree there - it is a pain though tends to get mixed in with domestic refuse!!

The most effecient collector of taxes are the private sector through PAYE and corporation tax. It's so hands off by HMRC that makes it efficient. All HMRC have to do is check the figures. If the CSA payments, or repayment of tax credits was done by employers, half the HMRC civil servants could be sacked and would be twice as efficient.

New builds can just use building control, there is no need for qualified electricians or anyone like them to put up new houses so not sure what you're getting at?

Given that a IR35 form is just once a year, I would call it onerous?
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Fred coughed up some electrons that declared:

I meant: Requiring good standards for energy efficiency, sound proofing and lots of other things is laudable for new builds (and maybe extensions) but it's also easy to handle on a new build. Your more likely to use registered companies (FENSA, NICEIC etc) there anyway.
What I was driving at was junk all non safety building regs for work done to existing properties.

Making a former one man band responsible for paperwork for his assistant seems an excessive burden. By all means allow it, but don't require it. Income Tax is a personal tax so it should be possible to pay cash in hand and leave it to the "employee" to sort out their own tax.
Perhaps it's not so clear cut to consider a permanant full time assistant - but many small tradesmen grow their business in stages - taking a bit of part time help from either a fellow tradesman or a lad who's wither a student or between jobs. This should be a simple "cash for a week's work" job. I've seen a lot of electricians on the IET forum ask about taking a lad on and a lot of responses suggesting it's more trouble than it's worth. If that really is the case, it's preventing business from growing (= more tax long term for HMG) and someone on the dole instead of out earning.
PAYE is great for people in bigger companies - economies of scale and all that, but I have enough brainache doing my own tax, I'd hate to be responsible for another person's. There's NI too.
Cheers
Tim
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Tim S wrote:

All that's really required is a web-based service whereby the employer keys in the employee's NI no. and tax code, gross wages, and the employer's PAYE ref, and out pops the net wages payable.
I know there are payroll services, but I don't think any are that simple or affordable for ad-hoc employees.
Owain
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Tim S wrote:

Sounds like you are talking about the CIS scheme rather than IR35...
(IR35 seeks to tax the individual based on the assumption that he is earning what the business is turning over (with various complications and wrinkles). So it basically stops the business from being able to operate as a business unless the MD does not mind enduring a personal tax rate potentially over 100% The understandability law applies to IR35 as it does much current legislation. If it seems to makes sense then you have not understood it!)

Indeed, but the bigger picture would require some joined up thinking...

You want to see what they expect disabled people requiring care assistants now have to go through - they are basically expected to run a complete PAYE system, and take on all the responsibilities of employing their own care assistants now. The fact that many of the most vulnerable in these situations require care in the first place because they are no longer able to live independently or maintain employment seems to escaped the powers that be who concocted these rules.
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Cheers,

John.

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I meant P35 and not IR35. IR35 is not a form but was originally a press release!
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Fred wrote:

A sentence ...
:-|
--
Adrian C

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Tim S wrote:

I'd go with the French approach, where if its a self build there's no BR requirement at all. You can build what you want.
Failing that, then some experimental development zones for people that want to get into that game. They could either be buils as you like, or might require some unestablished technology to be part of the design. It would provide a raft of successful new design ideas, along of course with an even bigger raft of failures and so-sos.
NT
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Tim S wrote:

However, replacement windows can be safety-related, eg means of escape, protection against falling out, or requiring to use safety glazing.
There is no training or qualification involved to set up as a builder, just a raft of different schemes run by self-interested bodies for different trades, so regulation and inspection is fragmented and messy.
Owain
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HMRC don't like small businesses. Much easier to lean on a big corporate payroll department.
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rests on no principles; it proceeds by no authority; it has no data; it can
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Did you miss out a "than" there ?
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geoff

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Pity , small businesses are the very lifeblood of the country;)..
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Tim S wrote:

I'd love to offer that as a service to customers. As it is, I clear up, bag all the stuff & carry it to where it can be collected, but I can't take it away for them.

Indeed. If that wasn't bad enough, you have the VAT threshold to worry about. I have a good mate who is semi retired, looking for 3 - days work a week. Excellent tradesman, really good with people, self employed, he would be a real asset.
There is still enough work about, if I increased the advertising I could generate enough extra work to sub contract to him. But then I'd hit the 67k VAT threshold and have to add 15% to my prices - which would make me uncompetitive. Catch 22.
<SNIP>

Local authority's also need to look at pointless, revenue raising parking restrictions. There are several good companies locally; plumbers merchants, printers, tool shops, hardwear shops where I like to buy stuff. Apart from crippling business rates, they suffer because customers can't park anywhere nearby. Allowing a van to park for 10 mins outside would make all the difference to them.

I'll add Humbug to that.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
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Sorry but I can't think of one of the above who hasn't got a car park here in Cambridge, where the anti-parking operation is now carried out by a special contracted firm;!...
Mind you they do prolly have more traffic lights per head of the population than anywhere else in Britain or Europe, perhaps the World, inner space - outer space - the universe even;!...
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tony sayer wrote:

I reckon the Medway Towns could beat Cambridge! 2.3 miles from here to Rochester Station. 12 sets of traffic lights.
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