Switchable Wall Outlet

I have an AC wall socket, currently controlled by a wall switch. I would like to change that outlet, so the one of the plugs is always ON. The other plug would remaqin as is, ergo controlled by the wall switch. I purchased a prior house with that configuartion for one socket. Alas I never looked to see how that "split" outlet configuration was implemented.
Can one inform me, how to make this change? Thanks
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On Thursday, December 22, 2016 at 2:57:48 PM UTC-5, Dave C wrote:

It depends on how it it wired. If the hot wire comes to the receptacle box, and then goes to the switch, it is fairly easy. You can cut the tab between the upper and lower socket and attach a hot wire to one socket and the switched to the other.
If the hot goes to the switch box first and then to the receptacle, you'll need to pull an always-hot wire to the receptacle box.
This image shows the easy set-up because the source hot is available at the receptacle:
http://www.electrical-online.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/wiring-switched-outlet-2.gif
This is how you require the receptacle after breaking the tab:
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/f3/1a/cc/f31acc65d0e9c1f34f84b877767bbc9f.jpg
This shows the source hot at the switch meaning you have no always-hot wire at the receptacle. This will require more than just a simple rewireing inside the receptacle box. You'll need to pull a new wire to get power directly to the receptacle.
http://www.do-it-yourself-help.com/images/switched_receptacle.gif
That is often done with a 3 wire cable from the switch box to the receptacle.
http://ask-the-electrician.com/images/switched-outlet-wiring-diagram-1.JPG
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On Thursday, December 22, 2016 at 3:39:22 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Actually, both of my first 2 images show the receptacle already split (I pasted the wrong link of the "before" wiring) but I think you get the idea.
Let me know if I confused you.
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On Thursday, December 22, 2016 at 3:39:22 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That diagram should show the white wire marked with black tape at both ends, at the switch and at the receptacle, to identify it as an ungrounded conductor.

That diagram shows it marked, but doesn't talk about it and most people not familiar wouldn't know it.

And the vast majority of receptacles that are wired to just a switch are done that way, hot to switch, then to receptacle, in which case it's not a simple job and like you say, needs a cable pulled.
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If you have to ask, my advice would be to call an electrician. You don't want to start a fire.
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On Thursday, December 22, 2016 at 3:52:28 PM UTC-5, Gordon Shumway wrote:

Now there's the spirit of a.h.r
We get the rare on-topic post and you send him packing.
God forbid someone actually learn something from this ng.
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If it were only that easy with you.

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On Thursday, December 22, 2016 at 6:08:32 PM UTC-5, Gordon Shumway wrote:

It is...just take the appropriate steps. You've heard of filters, haven't you?
This one's on you.

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On Thu, 22 Dec 2016 17:20:45 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

First thing that needs to be determined is if there is a live wire at the outlet with the switch turned off. If so, you have a "drop switch" configuration and it is easy. It will have the black wire of the "feed" wire-nutted to the wire to the switch, and the return from the switch on the "gold" screw of the outlet, with the white wire of the "feed" on the silver screw. By removing the "link" between the 2 gold screws and adding a wire to the black wirenut connection and connecting it to the gold screw of the desired "always live" side of the outlet, you have made one live and one switched.
If there is no live wire with the switch you have a "drop outlet" configuration where the power comes throughthe box where the switch is to the outlet - which is more involved to modify. Easiest way is to replace the wite from the switch to the outlet with a 3 wire cable in place of the 2 - with the black gouing straight through to the "always on" and the red running from the controlled side of the switch to the switched side. The black wire needs to be wirenutted through with a pigtail to supply power to the switch.
Not easy to do in a finished wall without opening up the drywall or plaster.
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On Thursday, December 22, 2016 at 9:36:26 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Why are you responding to my post with those instructions?
Perhaps you should be responding to the OP like I did, with basically the same instructions...and diagrams.
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On Thu, 22 Dec 2016 18:51:49 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I replied "to the group" which is comonly done on news groups.
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On Thursday, December 22, 2016 at 11:19:56 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nice try.
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I am honored.
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On Thu, 22 Dec 2016 14:51:57 -0600, Gordon Shumway

I asked because I did not know how to do a specific home wiring task. I knew the solution was simple, well within my capabilities -your snide comment ignored.
BTW: I am a degreed electrical engineer - though my area of knowledge/ experience is in designing Electronic Warfare microwave systems. You can ask me how to design/build a 70 dB DR DLVA 15 MHz video BW device and I will assist you - as used in ESM RWR receivers
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Just to set the record straight my advice was not snide. Not knowing your capabilities it was appropriate.

Snide mode activated. If you're a EE you must have been at the bottom of your class.
Snide mode deactivated.
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On Fri, 23 Dec 2016 17:34:27 -0600, Gordon Shumway

Actually I graduated in the top 20% of an Ivy league University class, as a EE. I was Director of Engineering at age 37, for a large defense company. I retired at age 45, 23 years ago because I could !!
I merely asked for advise! Clearly I was not soliciting your USELESS /Snide commentary !! I was fortunte, that other responders WERE Helpful, with sage advise that I implimented successfully.
Oddly, as I have followed this site for many years, I may have found your prior posts helpful. Too bad you find the need to .....
BTW: If you think it is Obvious, to cut the side connection, on the AC outlet - I also know that you are are a LIAR.
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On Saturday, December 24, 2016 at 3:01:10 PM UTC-5, Dave C wrote:

Aside from being a-hole, Gordo is apparently also under the mistaken assumption that the term "Electrical Engineering" somehow equates to Electrician. That assumption is something that I have experienced quite often over the years.
I have a BSEE so I can state with 100% certainty that "residential house wiring" was not part of the EE curriculum, at least not back in the mid-80's.
If an EE knows how to wire a split switched receptacle, it is something (s)he learned from a source unrelated to the degree they earned - unless perhaps it was an elective. It sure wasn't an elective at RIT back when I attended.
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On Sat, 24 Dec 2016 18:00:52 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
Snip

Kinda like a mechanical engineer knowing how to change a tire. I've known some who couldn't figure out how to change a refill in a retractable ball-point pen - but they could design pretty intricate stuff.
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On Sunday, December 25, 2016 at 4:46:09 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I doubt you have an EE degree, but if you do, are you telling us that where you got it, they had to instruct you on every single possible thing you will ever see? Where I got my degree, they taught us to think like an engineer, use electrical principles from Ohms Law to Maxwell's equations and apply them to the real world. It takes nothing more than the most basic understanding of electricity to be able to figure out how to wire a split-receptacle, something I already knew before I entered high school, let alone college. And no, no one had to specifically instruct me in how it worked. I saw one, figured it out in maybe a minute.

If you graduated from there, they should be embarrassed.
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trader_4 wrote on 12/26/2016 :

I disagree. When I first learned about electricity and Ohm's Law, my instructor used the 'plumbing analogy' and mentioned that it is not exactly correct but 'good enough for most electrical work'. If you wanted to go into physics or electronics it has many failures.
For one thing, current (measured in amps) does *not* flow through a conductor even though almost all electrical people will insist that it does. Current is the *rate* at which *charge* flows and the rate doesn't *go* anywhere. The number of charge *carriers* (usually, but not always electrons) past a certain point (or cross sectional area) can be counted and multiplied by the amount of charge each carries, to get the current.
Understanding Ohm's Law and/or Maxwell's equations may be a prerequisite for your chosen profession, but that doesn't mean everyone who knows them must also know how to wire household switches. There are other endeavors within the electricity fields than construction work. You would be completely bamboozled by ECM gear and someone who learned about it from the ground up (basic E & E) might assume, like you do, that the things they learned apply to all other fields, but they don't.
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