THIRD METHOD - Page 59

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THIRD METHOD


This method is one much used by English and German handrailers in Europe, and as it is based on the system formulated by the late Robert Riddell, it is also practiced by many handrailers in America. The system has been very much improved and simplified by Mr. John Wilson, and with the exception of a few additions and corrections it is his version of the system that is herewith reproduced, and I am sure the student will find the matter as set forth in these pages clear and easy to understand, as everything of an abstruse character has been eliminated.
The upper portion of the fence formed on the out­side of the stairs is the handrail, to assist in ascent and descent of the stairs, and also for protection. It is evident that the rail should follow the line of nosings and at a height of 2' 9" to the top side of the rail from the tread at the nosing, measured perpendicularly in line with the face of the riser.
In the construction of handrails the chief difficulty is in the wreaths, where the rail is of double curvature. Simple curves in either plan or elevation will cause no difficulty.

Fig. 1Ch. 3. Fig. 1. Plan of a rail for a level landing stairs.Ch. 3. Fig. 1. Plan of a rail for a level landing stairs. shows the plan of a rail for a level landing stairs with the risers landing and starting in the springing, the radius of the center line of rail half the width of tread.

Having the plan and center line drawn, the wreath being in two pieces and one face mould answering for


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