Manual Training Course in Concrete - Table of Contents

Manual Training Course in Concrete Cover Artwork

Manual Training Course in Concrete

Prepared for the use of instructors in planning and conducting elementary work in concrete
  • author: Association of American Portland Cement Manufacturers
  • published in: 1915
  • pages: 100

Table of Contents

Preface 2

LESSONS

I. Manufacture of Portland Cement
5
II. Concrete Aggregates 11
Origin and Composition 12
Igneous Rocks12
Sedimentary Rocks12
Sources of Supply12
Physical Conditions 13
Impurities13
Vegetable Matter13
General Requirements 14
Hardness14
Value of Different Rocks14
Weights. and Voids15
Maximum Size15
Cleanliness15
Analysis 16
Shape of Particles16
Classification16
Specific Gravity16
Determinations Necessary17
Density17
Gradation and Effective Size17
Granulometric Composition17
Cleanliness18
Conclusion 19
Voids19
III. Proportioning, Mixing, and Placing of Concrete 20
I. Proportioning 20
Theory20
Object20
Methods of Proportioning21
Sizing Materials22
Average Proportions23
II. Mixing 24
Amount of Water24
Fundamental Principle24
Shovel Mixing25
Machine Mixing25
III. Placing 26
Final Problem26
Pressure and Tamping26
Agitation27
Depositing Wet Concrete27
IV. Forms 28
Introductory 28
Classification 28
Lumber Forms 28
Rectangular Forms 29
Circular Forms 31
V. Concrete Foundations and Walls 33
Miscellaneous Forms 33
I. Foundations 33
Advantages33
Materials34
Excavation34
Footings35
Simple Foundations36
Piers and Engine Foundations36
II. Walls 37
Cellar and Basement Walls37
Cellar Floors38
Entrances39
Window-frames39
Finish39
Removal of Forms40
Block Foundation Walls40
Walls for Superstructures40
VI. The Surface Finish of Concrete 41
Mortar Facing 41
Spading 42
Sand Rubbed Surfaces 42
Experimentation 42
Brushed Surfaces 43
Rubbed Surfaces 44
Dressed Surfaces 44
Sand Blast Surfacing 45
Colored Surfaces 45
Designs 46
VII. Cement Products 47
I. Concrete Blocks 47
Historical47
Utility47
Materials of Manufacture48
Sand48
Gravel or Broken Stone48
Proportioning49
Mixing49
Consistence50
Molds and Machines50
Curing50
Building Construction51
Appearance51
II. Concrete Fence Posts 52
General Requirements52
Consistence52
Reinforcement52
Dimensions53
Molds53
VIII. Concrete Walks and Curbs 54
I. Concrete Sidewalks 54
Cost54
Corner Posts, etc.54
Economy and Durability54
One- and Two-course Walks54
Materials55
Proportions56
Mixing56
Concrete Mixers56
Consistence57
Subgrade57
Subbase57
Forms58
Placing58
Coloring59
Protection59
Freezing59
Expansion Joints59
II. Concrete Curb and Gutter Combined 60
Precautions 60
Similarity to Sidewalk Construction60
Subgrade61
Subbase61
Construction61
Placing62
III. Concrete Curb 63
One-course Work63

Laboratory Guide for an Elementary Course in Concrete Work

Scope of the Course 64
General Notes 64
Suggested Laboratory Instructions 65
Report on Laboratory Exercises 65
Report Sheet65
Suggested Exercises for Elementary Course in Concrete
Construction
66
Equipment Required 66
Outline of the Course 67
I. Materials and Mixtures 67
1. Classroom Work.67
II. Forms and Molds 71
1. Class-room Work.71
2. Form Work.73
III. Tools and Equipment 76
1. Class-room Work. 76
2. Woodshop Work.76
IV. Walk and Floor Work 78
1. Class-room Work.78
2. Form Work.82
V. Elementary Theory of Reinforcement 85
3. Concrete Work.85
1. Class-room Work.85
VI. Unit Construction 86
1. Class-room Work.86
2. Concrete Work.86
VII. Posts and Columns 90
1. Class-room Work.90
2. Form Work.90
VIII. Foundations and Piers 91
3. Concrete Work.91
1. Class-room Work.91
2. Form Work.91
IX. Ornamental Work 92
1. Class-room Work.92
3. Concrete Work.93

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.