Youtube video of my upside down Craftsman 10" Radial Arm table saw

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upDrKjY0adw

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"BoyntonStu" wrote

I'm sorry to say that this contraption, at least in its "upside down table saw" mode, appears to be an accident looking for a place to happen.
Different strokes for different folks, and I'm just an average woodworker with an average understanding of woodworking tools and their (safe) operation, but do you have dreams of marketing this thing?
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Last update: 3/27/08
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When I worked in a truss shop we would occasionally have to use a radial arm saw with the saw turned/aligned with the fence, the blade tilted and push through bottom cords to bevel for valleys when the table saw was down. I never saw any injuries but I'm not sure what OSHA would say.
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I hope his insurance company covers him when some one tries to copy and gets hurt and then blames him. It all seems pointless. A RAS in good working order will do the same with the normal table.
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A RAS in good working > order will do the same with the normal table.
In the rip position?
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BoyntonStu wrote:

If it was in good working order, it could be set in the rip or crosscut position as intended.
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Radial Arm saws have a very bad reputation, especially for ripping.
Emerson has sent out thousands of blade safety kits that must have cost them millions.
You can safely pull through on a table saw.
Why are there so many cautions against that on a RAS?
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BoyntonStu wrote:

The Sears recall had nothing to do with cross cutting, but an improved blade guard. I don't know that there are "so many cautions against that on a RAS". I haven't seen any reputable source cautioning against crosscutting. I have heard folks recommend an improper method by saying to pull the powerhead out, place the workpiece between the fence and blade and crosscut on the push stroke - a really bad idea. I've been using a RAS for 37 years in my home shop, first a Wards PowrKraft and now a Sears. With proper adjustment, tuning and technique, there are no issues with cross cutting using the RAS. The newer Craftsman RAS with "Control Cut" offers an extra margin of safety for cross cutting by use of a motor controlled cable that only allows the powerhead to advance at a set, but adjustable speed. Ripping on a RAS is also not a dangerous operation with a properly adjusted/tuned saw, proper technique and hold downs, push sticks, etc if required depending on the material and dimensions being ripped.
From your initial posts, it has been apparent that your RAS is not in good operating condition, probably because of improper adjustment and tuning, and that is why you use it with the power head locked in the rip position and go to all these contortions to compensate.
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Yes, I agree with most of what you say except RAS ripping.
A fixed saw position means that the blade cannot run.
I chose to compensate because of my good experience with my crosscut slide table on the Delta Table saw.
When the Delta motor died, I obtained the RAS for a very low price.
After I disassembled the head, cleaned and lubricated all moving parts and bearings, and finally tightened all play, I was still not satisfied.
The saw locked in the outrip position offers many advantages.
I can crosscut 27" without any problem with my slide table.
My rips using the shortened fence are very easy and I have not noticed any tendency for kickback.
I always use the splitter and always adjust the pawls and lower the guard to just above the stock.
See " kickback" on uoutube and you will see a master woodworker from England explain his theory about short rip fences.
I tried his method and he is correct AFAIK.
Basically, after the cut, there is no need for the fence, and the cut piece is too far from the original fence to bind.
.
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wrote:

Because of people like you. Some people should net be allowed be near power tools.
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Absolutely. Unless you have tampered with or screw up the saw this should not be a problem. I used on for about 7 years.
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I fail to understand why you have gone to all of this trouble to modify your RAS in this manor. I understand that the saw had some mechanical problems, but it seems that they could have been fixed much easier then what you have made. I have preformed all of the cuts you have written about on a unmodified RAS, including the use of jigs and sleds for special cuts. I find the RAS to be a poor choice for ripping due to the blade position and you have not rectified that problem. I also find that the Craftsman RAS arm will flex under load at the position you have it, this tends to cause kick back. That being said I find your modified RAS interesting but don't think I will be modifying mine to your specs. Have fun with it.

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I find the RAS to be a poor choice for ripping due to the blade position and you have not rectified that problem.
I am trying to understand this.
What is the basic difference between my setup with the blade above the table than that of a table saw with the blade coming up from below?
What is wrong about the position?
It can bevel in both directions and it can cut as deep as a table saw.
The motor height is higher than my rip fence.
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What have you done differently???? You still have a rip fence just like a normal RAS has eccept your contraption seems to have a much shorter fence than a regularly set up RAS would have.

You do seem to be very confused.

I think a you should look into an instructional class to learn how to use a RAS properly and get some equipment that has not been "rigged"
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You still have a rip fence just like a normal RAS has eccept your contraption seems to have a much shorter fence than a regularly set up RAS would have.
That IS the problem with a regularly set up RAS, the "infinite" rip fence.
Shortening the rip fence to just beyond the cut will increase safety.
That is exactly the point of why I chose to shorten it.
Do you understand why kickbacks occur?
see: How to avoid kickbacks
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVpGi85HfnY

and
Safer ripping with a short rip fence on the tablesaw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
QXIN2X8-w
Tell us what you think.
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Your are kinda short sighted. If you let the board angle away grom the fence it will bind with the blade and could cause kick back.

I seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.

Yup apparently you have found a new way to cause a kick back.
see: How to avoid kickbacks
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVpGi85HfnY


I think if the shorter fence prevented all kick backs they all would be short. The short fence only reduces the risk of the wood binding between the fence and the blade. With the shorter fence however you can now let the wood move away from the fence pivoting at the blade and cause the bind inside the kerf and get the same result.
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The arm, post, and motor in the way? A TS is wide open territory from the top. I can work from all sides. I can rip wider than a 48" sheet. I would like to see you cut a 4x8 sheet of plywood in 1/2 with your contraption! Can you safely run a 3/4" wide dado blade in that RAS? I doubt it! Not a problem with my TS. I have a RAS, it serves a purpose once in a while, but not very often!! Greg "One of the many not jumping on your "improved" RAS idea!!"
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I rip big sheets on the floor with my 4 foot extension handled circular saw and my homemade ripping guide.
I walk along as if I was using a hedge trimmer. Quite easy.
Much less lifting and much more convenient.
My 'contraption' is not able to do less than it was designed to do as a RAS.
Indeed, it still is a RAS if I unlock the head.
I don't know how well a dado will work as I have not needed to use it.
However, if I can nibble it on my sled it would be easy.
How do you crosscut narrow boards on a TS without a sled?
Back to safety and kickback.
Have you seen the videos?
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RE: Subject
Can we all spell "T-R-O-L-L"
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I'm thinking it's one of Woody's sock puppets.
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