your thoughts on metric

Page 10 of 11  


It was a JOKE. Yes, we understood and yes, you are correct.
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Ok, sorry, Ed, my sense of humor has been malfunctioning all week.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Oct 13, 7:26 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

You don't HAVE a sense of humour! <------see? NOW I am talking to you. Get it straight, you sad sack, you!
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) finally admitted:

You don't HAVE a sense of humour. You're too busy insisting that you're right, even when you're not...which is often.
Did you honestly think that I changed my e-mail so I could play with you?
I think you're due for an ego adjustment.
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My approach is to have many wrenches.
This includes both fixed size and adjustable.
As well as metric, imperial, etc.
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wrote

Is it too subtle? Metric ADJUSTABLE Imperial ADJUSTABLE No wonder you guys are so reluctant to change.
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says...

I'm surprised no-one has mentioned it yet: there is a brand of spanners called Metrinch. The name says it all. What's more, these spanners attach the centre of the sides of the nut, rather than the edges, meaning you can also use them on badly degraded nuts and bolts, without ripping off the corners. And they do all sizes. My set is made in USA ;-) Father in law told me about them 25 years ago, apparently Peugot used to include them in their toolkits way back then. I've got a socket set and a spanner set, they're brilliant if you have to deal with rusted farm machinery from time to time, as well as both metric and imperial nuts and bolts constantly.
-P.
--
=========================================
firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
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Peter Huebner wrote:

According to their Web site they're made in Taiwan. Might be really good but selling them using infomercials has pretty well shot their credibility. I googled them and the consensus among users seems to be that they actually work as advertised but have a lot of slop which makes wrenching in tight quarters problematical.

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--John
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Actually, one of the best ladders on the market, it has been cloned by all, is the Wing Little Giant is sold on infomercials and so is the Fein Multimaster. Infomercials are not always a sign of cheese.
I googled them and the consensus among users seems to be

Probably would not fly in an automotive shop where some brands of ratchets don't have enough clicks to be functional in tight spaces.
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Ugh!!! I hate those things. They will indeed bend into every shape known to man, but they are such a royal pain to move around and use. Try using one of those in all but the most open and unencumbered spaces. They're expensive too. I've used them and gone back to regular ladders of differing size and style.
--

-Mike-
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Perhaps you have used one that looks similar. I have 2 of them and see that the local dish installers use them. They are not a pain to use as are the ones that are all one piece. These ladders can easily and quickly come apart into 3 pieces. They are very easy to use in confined spaces. And really, they DO NOT bend in more than 3 positions. Closed, A-frame and straight open, no other position is possible. Yes they are expensive but most any quality product is.
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An additional note here, I think you are thinking about the ones that have 4 sections that are connected by 3 hinged joints. Those truly are a PIA. The Little Giant is really great. It telescopes on both sides and only pivots open at 1 hinged joint similar to a regular step ladder.
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You're right about the different ladders - I have used both styles and of the two I really hate the 3 hinge style the most. They are the most awkward to use. There's no question that the single hinge style of the Little Giant is far less awkward than the 3 hinge style, but I still prefer a straight up step ladder to those.
Some of our experiences may be reflective of the equipment we've used. I don't know how you use your ladders, and who else uses them, or how well they are cared for. I take care of my equipment as I suspect you do yours, but the equipment I have the (dis)pleasure of using from time to time is not always so well cared for. It gets thrown into trucks, jammed in to make it fit, buried under everything and yanked out from below it all, knocked around, left out in the weather, etc. You know - the basic don't care sort of thing. They don't work as well when exposed to this treatment. Subject the more simple step ladder to this same abuse and there isn't as much to go wrong. It just opens up and it's there. You have to deal with a regular step requiring more storage space, and you have to deal with keeping more ladders on hand, but I prefer that. If I need a 5 footer, that's what I use. As I'm fond of saying, it's all a matter of perspective.
--

-Mike-
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The ones that I used were really a pain, for the task at hand. I was doing installations of in-grid ceiling sound systems and in that environment, you're working among too many tradesmen. Electricians are there, masons and tile guys, carpenters, painters, and more, all working in the same small areas with all of their stuff scattered all over the place. It's a bad working environment, but it's the way it is. These ladders were very awkward to use since they have such a large footprint and require so much farting around to set up and to move. A regular step ladder is so much faster to open up, close up, move around, etc. It's much easier to move a 8 footer around in these environments and open it up than it is to set up one of these. Granted - that 8 footer is not as versatile, but I really hated using the little giant. The other thing that quickly became annoying was that with not a lot of use, the latches become difficult to work. Not real difficult, but sticky - kinda.
I know this - I can walk in with a standard 8 footer while someone else walks in with a Little Giant, and I can get my ladder on the floor, opened up and be up in the grid while the other person is still flipping those latches. For me, that is more important than the versatility that the Little Giant offers. For others, the opposite is true.
--

-Mike-
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Spray a little Endust on the latch and or extension slides.

The single cheap step ladder is easier but if you need to get up high the Little giant wins out. Mine works well when painting a winding star well, or any stair well, ;~) or getting up into a tree, one of mine will extend to 19'. Then I ended up buying a 3' clone version for working inside a house when you need something more than a step stool. If I had job specific applications I would do like you and get job specific equipment. I tend to take what ever comes my way.
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Huh? What are you - crazy Leon? 19 feet? In the air? That's almost 20 feet up man! I only get that high in a tree stand - not on any damned ladder. Ain't supposed to be that way. Never was.
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-Mike-
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LOL.. A buddy and I were up on our ladders, we wrestled with his 20' extension ladder and easily put mine up 6' away. We were in an entry way that had no ceiling until you reached the second floor ceiling. Both floors had 10' ceilings and we were hanging "BIG GAME" trophies. He grabbed one end of the antler and I grabbed the other and we went up one step at a time until the mounting hole met up with the lag bolt 16' up off the floor. We hung Moose, Elk, and a few bigger ones that I could not recognize. Thank goodness they were basically hollow as they 60 -80 pounds each. We balked when the customer said that he also had an elephant head to hang. That said, he, 18 years my senior had no problem shooting up his 40' extension ladder while I stood at the bottom making sure the bottom did not slide out from under him. Now that is one hard ladder to raise.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

I'll only do it in a an airplane.
I'm totally afraid of heights. <G>
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Ever since I bought this: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdIDT12
I've had no trouble with all those thirtysecondses and sixtyfourths.
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Your dad sounds like an interesting guy that would be fun to talk with over a cold one.
You bring up a very good point about the measuring system. Industrial revolution and interchangeable parts. They have made the US one of the most productive countries in the world. What many people fail to notice though, is that other countries have been taking over much of that manufacturing and we are being left out. They don't always want our products because they are not interchangeable, just as you'd have a difficult time getting your Saab repaired back in 1960.
It is not that one system is superior to the other, but it simplifies life if we all work towards the same goals. If my company insisted on buying only machines made with Imperial measure, we'd be out of business as no more machines are made in the US for our industry. Using metric, other countries have put rockets in space, built nuclear reactors, race cars, fine watches and heavy machinery. The standard of the photo industry was the 35 mm camera, the 8mm and 16mm movie cameras.
Those here that vocalize the superiority of the Imperial system have been using metrics all of their life, but are just afraid to admit it. I'd venture to say that many have not visited other countries to see how they do survive.
All of that said, I'm going to pour me a couple of ounces of adult sipping beverage from the 750 ml bottle.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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