your thoughts on metric

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Yeah - dream on, McDuff - any tool investment going on today still has to be backwards compatible, so will continue to be English.... Seem to recall published details more than a year ago that said "Metrication" has been abandoned as not practical.
'Sides, if fractions bother so much, English dimensions can also be indicated in decimals - have been for AGES..... Ever read a micrometer?
Lazy modern generation, anyway..... Leave 'em without a calculator & they can't give correct change.

Sorry - this is nothing more than an emotional issue - no science to it at all. NGA
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*snip*

You know, I once had a person use a calculator to give me change... and she gave me the wrong amount! This was at the bank too!
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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on 10/16/2007 8:19 PM Not Gimpy Anymore said the following:

It's practical, just not feasible.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Lee wrote:

I will as soon as I can buy a 11.90625 millimeter and 5.159375 millimeter socket (respectively).
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Your missing my point. I am talking about using metric in the current time for measuring...not replacing what we have now when it comes to tools
11.90625 millimeter and 5.159375

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Thu, Oct 11, 2007, 11:47pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@tds.net (Lee) doth sayeth: Your missing my point. I am talking about using metric in the current time for measuring...not replacing what we have now when it comes to tools
So say you. I'd have changed years ago, but can't find a reliable supplier of metric pencils.
JOAT "I'm an Igor, thur. We don't athk quethtionth." "Really? Why not?" "I don't know, thur. I didn't athk."
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Lee wrote:

With the crew I've been working with the last few days "Ticks" seems to work best. ;-)
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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on 10/11/2007 6:12 PM Lee said the following:

I'm with you. My math is a lot better with 10s, 100s, and 1000s, than cups, pints, ounces, quarts, gallons, inches, feet, yards, etc. My kids were learning metric in school 40 years ago in anticipation of a change that never happened. Like Professional Soccer, which never gained a hold, despite stars like Pele. What makes it worse is that some here in the US are using metric, like in the scientific world. I think the main reason not to change is to maintain a link with the UK. I know that a meter is about 39 inches, but that's about it. I'm tired of having to possess both SAE and metric tools to work on my cars. Even foreign cars built here in the US have metric bolts, nuts, and screws. Keep the Fahrenheit scale tho. I'm 70, but I can change.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I'm with you man. I use metric all day long at work: grams and liters. I hate the inch, foot BS.
I still don't understand why I buy soda by the liter and milk by the gallon though??
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We use metric measurement in the business of plywood/film faced plywood/blockboard/MDF/Hardboard and so on .All our plywood businesses were finished by using metric measurement, even if we do business with US, UK or Ca customers . All our customers from Europe, Africa, Middle East, other Asian countries use metric measurement .
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Mason Pan
Blog: http://www.plywood.cc /
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: We use metric measurement in the business of plywood/film faced : plywood/blockboard/MDF/Hardboard and so on .All our plywood businesses were : finished by using metric measurement, even if we do business with US, UK or : Ca customers .
Aren't "metric" plywood sheets something like 1200 x 2400 millimeters, which is oddly very close to four by eight feet?
And aren't bords in Europe sold in 2.4 meter lengths? Not a natural unit in metric.
    -- Andy Barss
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In plywood business ,four by eight feet is 1220X2440 mm in metric system . We sell 1220x2440 or 1250x2500 mm plywood / film faced plywood to Europe , USA and other countries .
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Mason Pan
Blog: http://www.plywood.cc /
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Isn't that wonderful. You have to manufacture and stock two different sizes, different by only a couple of inches. Not very efficient, is it?
When one or the other wins out - as will inevitably happen - which will it be? Pick one.
Will it be the 1220x2440? I'll be happy, because it will fit right on over my 12", 16" or 24" OC studs, joists or rafters. But it won't quite span the gaps of building done to metric standards. And working in metric units with odd numbers like 1220 and 2440 and their multiples and divisibles isn't much easier than working with inches, feet and fractions.
Will it be the 1250x2500? Easier to work with the numbers, and it will fit metric-built existing structures. But I'll have to trim every piece to get it to fit, won't I?
Wonderful.
John Martin
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Q1 Isn't that wonderful. You have to manufacture and stock two different sizes, different by only a couple of inches. Not very efficient, is it?
Reply: In plywood business ,"four by eight feet" means "1220X2440 mm only" in metric system . But some customers from Europe and other areas prefer 1250X2500 mm .
I think metric system is more efficient .
Q2 When one or the other wins out - as will inevitably happen - which will it be? Pick one. Reply: As to me, I prefer metric system . Because it's easy to do calculation in metric system .
I agree with you that one will inevitably win out . But it may takes a very long time in the future .
--
Mason Pan
Blog: http://www.plywood.cc /
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John Martin wrote:

How are you going to handle changing out a passage door? ;-)
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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: I am getting a bit fed-up with the 15/32...13/64... and the rest of the crap : measurements we use here. Why shouldn't I go to what the rest of the world : uses? Metric. Please no political BS.
:Seems like using 10's is a lot easier.
A common thought about metric, and a fallacy as far as I'm concerned. It's easier to divide and multiply by multiples of 10 in metric, but so what? "Jeez, I think the overhang on that tabletop looks a bit scanty, so I think I'll try ten times more"? "Heck, that shelf is too long. Better try a tenth that length and see how it looks"?
If you think about it, imperial measurements (in 16ths and 12ths) have more integral divisors (2, 3, 4, 6, 8) than metric ones do (2 and 5).
Plus, the imperial units correspond better to humanscale proportions (as le Corbusier and othr designers discovered when they switched ou of metric).
It's inches, feet, yards, furlongs, cubits, and barleycorns for me.
A pint's a pound, the world round.
    -- Andy Barss    
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"Hmm, two feet is a wee bit too long, I'll try two inches..."

But with metric it is easy to "upgrade" your precision. If m is to coarse, try cm, if that still too coarse try mm, or even micrometers if you are truly finicky ("1 meter, no make that 102 cm, 1023 mm to be precise"). How do you sanely add precision to 3 feet and 14/64 inch?
The power of metric is that you can easilly add 14 mm to 17.3 cm, and then place that on top of 1.05 m. Worst case with imperial you end up with 16ths, 12ths, inches feet and yards. All at once.
/Par
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Par snipped-for-privacy@hunter-gatherer.org
It would be relevant at events if people were making a reasonable attempt
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this is the real strength of the old system, and why it's better for design.

indeed, many systems of measurement historically were based on human measure.
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Metric is to blame for 15/32" plywood -- it's the nearest Imperial approximation of whatever some overseas plywood factory is producing in metric, specifically 12 mm.
Imperial units math is really quite easy. To divide a fraction by 2, simply multiply the denominator by 2.
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A stairbuilder I used to work with had a laminated piece of paper with a conversion table that he used. He could switch back and forth between metric and inches as he needed. I think it went to 32nds. It seemed silly to me at the time, but now I can see that it might be useful.
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