Your thoughts on how to sell table saw

I just got a Unisaw for my birthday (a big saw for a big birthday).
Well, now I have to sell the tablesaw I have. I have a nice tablesaw "assembly" that I built up from pieces and I don't know how to sell it. It has a table that extends 58" to the right with a 48" rip capacity using a Sommerville T-Slot model TT45 fence. If you are familiar with it, it is a really nice fence and cost me about $300 on sale at a show. I made the table and it has a formica top. The tablesaw, although adequate, is an old 1988 Tiwaneese Mao-Shan TSC-10L with 2 cast iron extensions (webbed) that I bought used for $200 several years back. I kept the original fence in anticipation that I might want to sell the saw without the fence. The saw is mounted on a mobile base that I built up from a "Delta-like" component mobile base using a hardwood frame. Everything is in very good shape and the Sommerville fence is like new. As you can see, I have a Civic saw with a BMW fence. All the equipment has manuals. I think I should probably sell the thing in pieces because the saw will probably pull the value of the whole down if I try to sell in as a whole. What do you folks think? What would you do?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 21:03:35 -0500, "Eric Anderson"

TWS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, if it was me, I'd be passing the old saw on to my son.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I was to pass my tools on to my son, my DIL would have them in the yard sale next week. Neither would know what to do with them. OK, I'm exaggerating a bit. Either one could use a screwdriver providing I marked which end to use on the screw.
Maybe you could donate the saw to some organization? Youth group? Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

That's a bummer Edwin. Leads me to a "dad's story"...
When my daughter Amy graduated High School we bought her a used car - a '94 Sunbird. It was more that we bought the car from a friend we went to church with to help her out financially, than that we bought it as a graduation present for Amy. But... since we bought it, it did make a good car for Amy. I had to open my big mouth and tell Amy that I'd paint it any color she wanted. It was an "old people's green" and she decided she wanted it black. So - we took the car apart and painted it black. Amy had to work on the car with me as part of the deal. She took bumpers off, all the trim pieces off, door moldings, etc. She had to climb in and de-grease the firewall and the sheet metal under the hood, since we had to paint all of those areas, as well as door jambs, etc. If you've never done a paint job on a car in which you are changing the color, it's a massive amount of work. There are more places that are painted than you'd ever imagine. I did all of the body work and Amy had to help with sanding everything down. She wet sanded the whole car a few times. Finally I shot the car and we both put it back together. A great deal of it she put back together herself. I was happy that she was learning something from the experience, and would hopefully have a sense of ownership in this car and take better care of it than is common among kids today. She's not a tomboy who would normally do these kinds of things of her own accord so it was even more satisfying to see her working on the car for those reasons. It was a lot of work and she certainly did not enjoy every moment of it. But... she did learn a ton about how a car is built and she learned she can do a lot more than she ever thought she could, even with complex things.
Advance two years in time...
Amy calls me up from college. She's with a friend and the friend's car's power antenna is broken and the motor won't stop running. The girls call from Philadelphia to ask me how to disconnect the antenna motor. On this car, the antenna is on the fender so I tell Amy she'll have to reach up inside the inner fender to find the power connector for the antenna and pull it off. So... there in the parking lot of the campus dorms, Amy grabs her tool kit out of her trunk (emergency kit that I insisted she have in the trunk) and proceeds to take down the inner fender of the car. Completely unabashed, unintimidated. Turns out the connector was not at the motor and they had to remove a couple of other panels in the passenger compartment to find it, but they did. And the problem was a fixed as it was going to be for the time being. No cost.
I felt like that proved the value of the entire painting effort. Amy had learned a great deal that we both thought she'd never really use, about how cars go together. She has the hands on experience of taking one apart and knowing that she has put it back together again. Couple that with a sense of helping people out that is just part of her nature, and low and behold, she charged in and just did what had to be done.
I love to tell this story because it's just one of those dad things. We teach our kids things, they hang out with us doing all sorts of tool things and we suspect that a great deal of it my never be used by them in the future. That they'll never really care about any of this. Sometimes they don't. Amy is the third of four for me and although she's the only one who has taken a car apart with me, they've all been exposed to lots of tool type stuff and all have done lots of fix it stuff with me. They've all been part of building stuff and they all certainly know what it means to be told that they "are a table - just stand there and be a table" (hint - outfeed...). Some of my kids simply don't care to ever lift a screwdriver and act like they don't know how to even pick it up. Others, well, that's what this whole story was all about.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Mike Marlow" wrote in message

That a keeper, Mike ... Thanks for a good start on the day!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Outstanding story...
Mike Marlow wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip of Ed's son choosing another path...>

experiences, whether they are enjoyable and/or difficult?
I have no idea if my sons are going to be handy with the tools I chose. They do seem to be pretty handy with the tools, and specialties thay have chosen, and for that, I am grateful.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike Marlow wrote:

Awesome story Dad. Walk tall.
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike Marlow wrote:

Thanks for posting!
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Habitat?
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What you need is someone who will appreciate what you have built, and need to use it, rather than buy new. You need a woodworkers' club or an adult education program, with a mailing list and/or a bulletin board.
Good luck, and be patient. I don't know that I'd be in a huge hurry to part with it, if storage space were not an issue.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the comments, guys. My youngest son is the only one that remotely would have an interest sometime in the future. I think it would be 10 years before that could be a possibility, in the meantime, it would remain in his way in the basement gathering dust. I could use the $$ to offset the cost of the Unisaw. After all, that was quite a present and I feel I could donate some money to the "general fund". I don't have to sell it right away because I do have room. I am taking my time putting the Unisaw together and I need the old one to finish the dresser I am building for my wife.
Question still is, do you think the assessories are too "high end" to sell with the saw?
"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Too high end? Were they too high end for your use? Then they'll not be too high end for the next guy. I guess we all have to accept the fact that when we invest in things like fence systems that we're not going to get all of our money back when we go to sell the complete saw, but a decent, stable saw with a good fence system, and other add-ons is still exactly that. It's a good tool. What would you pay for the whole thing as it stands? What can you really get for the piece parts if you sold them separately? If you can't use them with the new saw, then I'd sell them with the old one and price it at what I would pay for a system such as it.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've pondered this very question, since I have a delta contractor's saw with a unifence and I lust after that grizzly 12" cabinet saw with a beis clone. I eventually concluded that I would keep them both. I could set one up with a dado set, and a normal blade in the other. Or, I'm considering getting a saw blade with a special grind for making dove tails. I could put that in the contractor's saw. I also considered turning the contractor's saw into a router table, but it's worth too much as a saw to do that. In your case though, maybe you could convert it. If space isn't an issue, and you're not trying to recoup some money from the old saw, just keep it. Just wheel it out of the way or use it as a work table. Wheel it out when you want to make a quick cut without losing the setup on the unisaw.

oh, you suck. :-)
brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Would like to, but 2 of these things would just take too much room.

So does the big birthday

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Congrats. Don't worry about big birthdays. They are just another day, except on that day you have an excuse to buy more tools :-P

At my local lumberyard there's a bulletin board where people can post a 3x5 card listing items they have for sale. I notice that nothing lasts very long.
Cheers, Nate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you're ebaying it or some other media where you have the opportunity to do pictures and text, I'd take copious pictures, especially of all the features, and state that the saw started out as a "xxx" table saw, with the following updates/additions.
* list them * out in * bullet format
With some more descriptive text where necessary.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The answer to that comes from knowing the psyche of potential buyers. Nobody knows that and you'll be second guessing all day. My thought is that the saw is worth practically nothing. The accessories have the value. Put it up as a package deal on ebay with a reserve price (minimum that you will take) and see what happens. A knowledgeable buyer that would appreciate the fence will figure it out, buy the whole thing and sell off the parts they don't want.
I'd suggest lots of high quality pictures and good description, especially about the fence.
It costs nothing to test the waters on ebay and you'll get a much more definitive answer than a poll from this group.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.