Your kickback experience

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wrote:

I've had two, both my fault, not the equipment
Late at night wanted to make just one more cut. full bevel cut on a right tilt and I was just a little too lazy to change the fence over to get the tilt going away from the fence. Trapped piece kicked back, caught me in the side then traveled another ten feet and put a deep ding in a solid ply shop door. Bruise on my side lasted for weeks.
second was on a planer. Put a piece in that was too short for the machine. Kicked out and turned the feed hand black and blue and unusable for a week or so.
As mentioned, I knew better in both cases. Wasn't the fault of the machines, simply operator error.
Frank
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I had 3 cases worth mentioning. One was a 45 degree cut with the main panel on top of the blade and the off cut under and away from the fence. The off cut kicked back and hit me in the abdomen. I have done the same cut a number of times since, and the off cut piece hasn't ever kicked back since. Another time, I was crosscutting some short pieces. I put a block on the fence to measure with and to provide room so that the pieces wouldn't bind and kick back. Well, the pieces were wider than long, and one turned sideways and kicked back. The other time was on a construction site. A guy provided a Ryobi bench top table saw for ripping some siding into corner blocks. This is a saw that has trouble cutting dry 2 x 4 material. A buddy ripped off a 4 inch wide piece and left it. It slowly kicked back and barely cleared the table saw. I imagine the weak saw, and with no outfeed table so the piece arched and barely contacted the blade, and a low fence combined for a wimpy kickback. I told him that if he had been using my shop saw (Unisaw) that the off cut would have gone across the pool, across the driveway and into his truck, and he didn't seem to understand. robo hippy
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scribbled:

About 15 years ago, I was doing a test cut on my table saw. I stupidly used a short piece of 2X4 (about 4 inches long). I was holding it gingerly instead of using a push stick and didn't have a firm grip on it. Needless to say, it kicked back right on my left tit. I yelled out and cursed in at least three languages. The LOML thought I had chopped off a hand or something. No blood on the outside, but my tit turned all kinds of neat colours, purple, blue, green, red, yellow, etc. No permanent damage. Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Woodworking
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I will give you three. Two that have happened to me during 35 years or so of table saw use. One very serious one that happended to a friend of my son:
1) Many years ago I got a piece of 1/2" plywood (about 2' square) crossed up in the table saw that WAS fitted with a splitter. I think the mass of the plywood just overpowered the splitter and pawls because it lifted off of the table and a corner of the piece hit me in the chest. Hurt-no band aids.
2) About four years ago I was cutting ripping the edge off of a piece of 2x about 1-/2' long and got a kickback (no splitter - shame!). I saw it coming and stepped aside. The piece of wood flew about 10' across the garage and ended up hanging from a hole in the sheetrock. Could have hurt real bad.
3) I have posted about my son's buddy a couple of times since it happend last spring. He was planing some thin stock in a surface planer. They don't know exactly what happened but a piece of stock, apparently about 1" square and several feet long, got past the rollers and impaled him in the abdomen. He ended up with much of the stock protruding from his back. Luckily it missed most organs but did nick an intestine. He spent quite a bit of time in the hospital and as of a month or so ago he was 'almost' back up to speed. Unusual but rest assured this could happen with a table saw too.
RonB
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wrote:

Loads of them, never stood where they were going to get me.
Last one was in taking angled filler strips off the edge of a softwood board. These were maybe 1/2" x 1/4" at most, so pretty lightweight. The saw fired one off (between the blade and the fence) which flew a couple of feet then hit a light plastic toolbox on the shelf behind. It punched a neat hole in one side, then out the other.
So even if it's only a lightweight offcut, don't underestimate the energy in those trimmings!.
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Mike W. wrote:

Not sure these qualify as kickback, but they seem to line up with what others are posting.
First was a brief moment of misjudgment (read: stupidity). I was moving a piece of ~ 1' x 2' ply I had recently rabetted from the right extension wing of my TS to my workbench, and I swung it into the blade. Board caught me in the gut and knocked the wind out of me. No bruising or cuts, but enough of a scare to call it quits for the day. At the time my saw was a tiny little 50 year old Craftsman (crapsmen for the more clever in the group) with an 8" blade. I think my DW746 would've caused a bit more damage.
The other time was when I was planing a board that I now realize was way too thin... I was approaching 1/8". The board broke at a knot, and the planer sent half of it sailing out so fast that I never even saw it. My only clue that something happened was that only half the board came out the other end. (I had ear plugs AND over-the-ear muffs on at the time). I eventually found the missing half lying on my garage^H^H^H^H^H^Hworkshop floor by the door, with a fresh 1/2" deep impression in the door a couple above it. I'm not entirely sure how it got past the infeed rollers. Perhaps that half of the board was thinner than the half that had already gone through.
Work safe.
-John in NH
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I had a piece of 3/4" ply 14" X 14" kick back. The saw flung it so fast I never saw it. It was flung spinning like a Frisbee, hitting me on the left hip, and deflecting off at about right angles. It flew 10 ft or so and smashed into one of those transparent plastic bins, which totally exploded. I wasn't hurt at all, only because the spin on the Frisbee was advantageous.
-jbb
wrote:

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http://www.flurl.com/uploaded/kickback_3805.html This happened to me about ten years ago. I had been working very long hours and wasn't getting enough sleep. I was cutting 3/4" dadoes with a dado blade and after a pass inadvertently let the board come back into contact with the far side of the blade. The board kicked back so fast I never even saw it. I knew I was hit, but wasn't sure where. Checked my hands and said "oh sh*t". Very little blood, in fact over the next three hours maybe only a dozen drops. Called into ER and told them I'd had a tablesaw accident. Spent the afternoon there, listening to the doctors argue over what to do. They were talking about reconstructing tendons, ligaments, veins, etc. I finally spoke up and told them I didn't think I was actually cut. but was just hit at the joint very hard. One them said okay lets find out. He pulled the end of the finger back on to the knuckle and it stayed (then there was lots of blood). Four stitches and I was out the door, good as new. Got back to the shop and found the piece I had been cutting had impaled itself completely into 3/4" plywood sheathing behind me. I knew I had been very lucky. Number one rule in my shop now is "Do NOT use power tools when you are tired"
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Of course, that trip into the ER and the 4stitches probably ran up a $1000+ ER bill, hope you had medical insurance of some kind
John
On Sat, 05 Nov 2005 09:36:39 -0600, Rudolph Wilhelm

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...

Once. Failed to push the piece far enough past the back of the saw blade, and it vibrated forward and caught the back end ... wham.
It didn't hurt me because I was standing left of the blade. I always use the blade guard and splitter where possible, and for narrower cuts I use fingerboards. The bolts for my Jet splitter/guard are replaced with hand- turn knobs to make it fast to remove and install. For crosscuts I prefer a sled.
It sure was enough to put the fear of God in me, though. And it seriously messed up a beautiful little bookmatched flame cherry panel I'd been working on.
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Some years ago I was cutting a 2x2 square of fiberboard on the tablesaw. For some reason I did not hold the material tight against the fence and it slightly rotated, kicked back, and hit me in the thigh. I suffered a black-and-blue mark and was lucky the hit was not in the gonads.
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Not a table saw story, but about 25 years ago, a friend was killed in a saw mill kickback accident. Cecil was a preacher, farmer, mechanic, and all around jack-of-all-trades. I'm not certain how it happened but the piece hit him in the head. He had a closed casket funeral. RIP Cecil.
Gary
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gary said:

What a way to start the day... Sorry for the loss of your friend, he sounds like a real Renaissance Man - in dungarees.
Ever seen a 60" mill saw operated with no guards, and almost no safety equipment? Or trim/grading operators working with a 22" blade 12" from their left arm... scary stuff!
Greg G.
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When I first started woodworking I had a pretty nasty kickback. I was trying to rip a big piece of plywood (no infeed or outfeed table) and while pushing it through allowed it to twist just enough to catch the back of the blade. Piece lifted up and was thrown into my gut, hurt like hell, monster bruise. Looking at the piece you could see where the teeth had grabbed it and thrown it back. These days I have two of the anti kickback wheels that attach to the fence and a griptite to keep stock firmly against the fence, I also use a tru-grip and circular saw for my big panel cuts these days.
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