Your favorite plunge morticing jig

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Up spiral 1/2 bit carried pretty well. Keep the rpm up on the router and use the vacuum extractor if you have one. I don't. I took what it gave me on the first pass, hit with air to clear corners and took a finisher.
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www.routerworkshop.com
Some of the jigs with video online:
www.routerworkshop.com/adjusttenon.html Adjusting The Tenon
www.routerworkshop.com/boxjoints.html Easy To Make Box
www.routerworkshop.com/columns1.html Gluing Fixture For
www.routerworkshop.com/cuttingpattern.html Making A Table
www.routerworkshop.com/dovetail45.html Dovetail Corner
www.routerworkshop.com/dovetaillegs.html Dovetail Joint For
www.routerworkshop.com/ezindex.html Extended Lengths With EZ
www.routerworkshop.com/hingetip.html A Simple Hinge
www.routerworkshop.com/pedtabledovetail.html The Pedestal
www.routerworkshop.com/quickpattern.html Best Way To Make A
www.routerworkshop.com/rbpattern.html Using A Pattern To
www.routerworkshop.com/revinlay.html Making An Inlay
www.routerworkshop.com/smstraightbit.html 1" Straight Bit
www.routerworkshop.com/spacerfenceslot.html Shelf Dividers.
www.routerworkshop.com/veinfixture.html Table Skirt Vein
www.routerworkshop.com/veinjig.html Flute and Veining

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thanks....but really didn't see alot of morticing in those links......actually can't stand watching those guys ;-)

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You saw the method for making the jig you need, so use it. www.routerworkshop.com/veinjig.html
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snipped-for-privacy@patwarner.com wrote:

I made a simple one the opposite of this. Mine is a base that has a solid and movable fence. The solid fence is a support for the router and the movable fence is behind it for the router to slide against. You lay the board to be morticed on top of the plywood against the base fence then another base fence goes next to it and its clamped it together then end stops clamp on top.
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mcgyver wrote:

That would be a good enough excuse for getting the General International 75-075M1, tilting head, angleable fence and XY table - if you're a tool junky and no SWMBO to bitch about the price.
You can make something that works out of ply or MDF - but you'll probably overlook a key capability and have to modify it or make an add on. Usually end up with something that sort of works - for one specific task, or maybe a couple. And when it's not in use you have to find a place to store it. If you don't make, and keep notes on how to use it the next time you go to use it there'll be a learning curve to get over before yo get to making "the real thing".
Then there's the Trend M& T Jig. Very easy and versatile for mortises, not quite as easy for tenons. So simplify things and go with "loose tenons" and just use the mortising process. Oh, and get a couple of extra clamps - they come in handy.
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/TrendMTjig/TrendMTjig1.html
You can cut angled mortises on one or two axis as well. Handy when making chairs (not a problem with some of the A&C / Greene & Greene / Stickley / Frank Loyd Wright / MacIntosh chairs)
charlie b
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I'm a little late for this but here is mine. Dave http://www.teamcasa.org/workshop/mortisejig.htm
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Impressive! Where'd ya get that angle? 4" x 6" (1/4" thick?) Impressive find or expensive purchase?
Also - kudos on the gate!

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What is the preferred bit? Spiral upcut the same thickness as the mortise? One of the sites looked at recommended a two flute straight bit (which are quite a bit cheaper).
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Spiral upcuts have their upsides and downsides (pardon the pun).
Upside: You can plunge straight down into the mortise, where with a two flute, you have to move back and forth as there is no cutting surface on the point of the bit. Downside: spiral upcuts have a tendency to be yanked down into the workpiece. This can be alleviated by setting the stop on a plunge router. I like to use my stop for the finished depth of the mortise, so this could be a small problem unless you have multiple stops (most plunge routers do). As you mentioned, they are expensive and success rates with sharpening are (from what I've heard) not good.
I use 2 flute straight cutters for all my mortises.
my $.02 worth, ymmv, etc etc....

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2 flute, solid carbide aluminum cutting end mills work as well or better than spiral router bits and are cheaper. Also, as for sharpening, send them (end mills or spiral router bits) to a shop that sharpens metalworking tools. These bits would be considered simple to these guys. I wouldn't expect wodworking tool grinders to have the equipment to sharpen spiral bits.
Joe wrote:

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"MB" wrote in message

I have good luck with spiral upcut, two or four flute, "end mills" of the same diameter as the desired mortise and, besides the extra lengths available for deep mortises, they are often cheaper. Last time I ordered, the 1/4", 5/16", and 3/8" 4 flute end mills were $16, $19, and $27 respectively.
www.travers.com
PDF of their catalog online at:
https://www.travers.com/htdocs/catalogs.shtml
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mcgyver wrote:

Off-line, there is a nice one in Creating Coffee Tables: An Artistic Approach by Craig Vandall Stevens. It is versatile because it can do side and end mortises. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED book.
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