Your favorite plunge morticing jig

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Been looking around the web (DAGS) looking for a morticing jig to build. Seen ones from very simple to very elaborate. Before I build one thought I would see what everyone thought really worked. have 6 chairs to build with aprox 20 mortices per chair. thanks
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My favorite is a few chunks of MDF/scrap hardwood, clamped tightly and carefully, then screwed together while still clamped. Especially on repeated parts - this gives the exact same results on each piece, every time.
You may have to make a few, but it costs next to nothing, and each mortise is just like the last. (So make sure the first is right!)
When you're done, toss it in the woodstove as kindling!

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Ok, so here's my dilemma. Do you use a 3/4" or so template collar in the jig you suggested (concerned about chip removal with upspirling 1/2" bit) or do you mount this to your router base. You see there are 2 very different approaches to this fairly simple task (100's of variations of those) and i can't get my head wrapped around one or the other! thanks
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"mcgyver" wrote in message

I
with
Scroll down to Router Mortising Jigs:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/Jigs.htm
While you're there, check out:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/Projects10.htm
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mcgyver wrote:

The version I've settled in with is simply a plywood (or lexan) platform with two sliding parallel fences carriage bolted to the bottom of a plunge base. Simple and cheap to make, and a no-brainer to use. I align the tool with the center of the proposed mortise with a pointed "centering bit", then install the actual mortising bit. I start and stop the slide manually at marks on the stock, which are transferred from a story stick to each part.
My tenons are table sawn with a dado blade and crosscut sled, and hand tuned with a shoulder plane, so the manual stop method is good enough for me. I round the corners of the tenon with a rasp or bench chisel. Each part gets one edge aligned to marks from the story stick, and the tenon is tuned to fit properly and lettered to match at glue-up time.
I've also routed mortises on my router table and with a gutter-shaped jig, and like this one the best. Two edge guides will work, as well.
Have fun! Barry
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Barry, very simular to pat warners design. Nice because it allows for chip removal. thanks

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Two come to mine:
ShopNotes #90 has a VERY simple one.
http://www.shopnotes.com/issues/090/extras/plunge-router-mortising-jig /
Here is my personal favorite that I built:
Woodsmith 06/03 issue:
http://www.woodsmith.com/issues/147/videos/setting-up-and-using-the-router-jig /
The first one is DEAD simple but doesn't have flexibility of the second one. The second one has the ability to create oversize mortises very easily. I still like the first quite well.
Both jigs work well, so it really depends on what you prefer.
mcgyver wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

That's exactly what I use. It's an OLD design, I'm sure the first person to ever get a router probably built one the next day. <G>
It won't perform many tasks, but it sure does one very well.
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I did in fact lose my mind(mine).....
Pat Barber wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

I built that one and it works just fine. Was I making another one, I'd use transparent plastic rather than opaque plywood for the baseplate, just to give a better view of what you are doing.
David Starr
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David Starr wrote:

Cut a bigger hole.
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will post pics of mine in abpw.
Joe C.

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Have had good results from this one:
http://patwarner.com/router_morticing.html
PW ************************************************ mcgyver wrote:

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Thanks pat, looked through your site and thank you. I would say that yours is on the high end ($300) and a piece of plywood with a 3/4" slot cut in it for the collar template is on the other. Thanks to all, I've seen some really good "in betweens" and will probably adapt alot of them to what i finally design. thanks

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Take your plywood and tack on parallel pieces of straight stock at the proper interval for your chosen collar. Cut a bunch of spacers for the interval between mortises (less twice the collar offset) and a spacer to set the mortise width (plus twice the collar offset). Tack in the interval pieces, then plunge the plywood to make your template, attach to the fence which you clamp to the stock to be mortised.
Did 52 slats (104 mortises) with one similar on the crib project, and it worked dandy.
If you get it, watch the Router Workshop on PBS a few times. They show basic jig techniques quite often.
Just finished
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George, thanks...did you have any problem with chip removal? Did the chips get caught up in the template collar track in the plywood? Your way is the easiest but any problems? thanks

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"mcgyver" wrote in message

chips
the
IME, for chair leg mortises, there is probably nothing more simple, fast and effective than a steady hand and a good edge guide. This seems to be David J. Marks' preferred method.
Are you doing loose tenon joinery?
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Ahhh, I found out the hard way that with the edge guide on the left of the work piece (and nothing on the right) the bit can "pull" into the left hand side of the mortice ( when a push of the router is needed to "clean up" the fartherset edge) hope that makes sense. Simular to climbs cuts ect that have to do with the rotation of the bit.

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"mcgyver" wrote in message

hand
the
have
If that's the case, then I'm thinking that you perhaps misunderstand the correct use of a router.
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mcgyver wrote:

Which is why you can put _two_ edge guides on the same rails, or if you don't have two guides, spend 30 minutes cobbling together the wooden base with two rails. <G>
Shallower cuts can also go a long way toward curing torque issues.
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