You Never Know Who You'll Meet At A WWing Show

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The SF Bay Area Woodworking Show ended today and my bank account is a grand lighter.
While standing in line for a burger, the guy ahead of me looked familiar. Neatly cut gray hair, glasses with the black string thing, pressed blue 3 button dress shirt, khaki trousers with straight pressed seams, polished but comfortable shoes, and, oh yeah - a very neat shop apron.
"Excuse, me." I said "But if you're not Frank Klausz you could be his twin."
The gentleman turned around and I immediately saw his name tag - Frank Klausz.
"Your bench was the inspiration for the workbench I built, and I even did a spalted maple spacer for the shoulder vise just like yours. And I've gone through your Hand Cut Dovetail Drawer video 15 or 20 times and can actually cut dovetails pretty well thanks to you."
"Thank you." said Mr. Klausz.
"Are you teaching a class on handcut joinery?"
"No, I'm at the Felder booth."
"Well it was a pleasure meeting you.", we shook hands and it was over.
Then I went back and sat in on Graham Blackburn's How to Make Handcut Dovetails.
charlie b
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charlie b said:

<snip tale of fawning over famous woodworker>
Yeabut - what neat tools did you buy for a grand?
(Just kiddin ya) ;-)
Greg G.
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--
"charlie b" < snipped-for-privacy@accesscom.com> wrote in message
news: snipped-for-privacy@accesscom.com...
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At least you didn't fawn all over him. I find that so embarrasing! Tom
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charlie b said:

Listen Charlie,
I apologize for the rude comment. I was revved up after talking to a good friend of mine and went a little over the top. Although we joke around like that a lot, it was an inappropriate slam to a relative stranger. Your conversation with Frank was totally acceptable and most certainly polite. It was simply a bad joke on my part.
I wish we had famous woodworkers in my part of the country to rub elbows with - although I suppose Jimmy Carter does fit into at least one of those categories.
Greg G.
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I thought it was hilarious. And I, too, want to know what he dropped the grand on.

But have you met him? I have a friend (and coincidentallly a lifelong Democrat who's active in local politics) who met him. Not at any function or in an official capacity. He was at the museum in Plains wandering around looking at exhibits and Carter happened to be there. He has a picture of the two of them on his "love-me" wall.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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LRod said:

Glad I could be of service. As for the tools, we may never know the truth... SWMBO probably has him confined after finding the huge bulging tarp in the garage.

Sure, we're the best of friends. I grew up in Atlanta. We go to cookouts together all the time. His father is my aunt. His dog pissed in my yard once. A rock thrown by his rear tire broke the windshield on my 1986 Yugo in 1982 on I-285.
Sorry, it's one of those days... ;-)
Greg G.
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That's a neat trick. Any surgery involved?

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Probably just a grizzly WW accident...
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One of my past coworkers worked with Jimmy Carter in several Habitat for Humanity projects.
She said he was very stingy with his tools. :)
-Zig
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Having been involved in Habitat projects for a number of years, I can tell you that from what I've seen, being stingy with one's personal tools is quite understandable. I got to the point where I brought as few personal tools as I could, made easier since we got some funds that were used to buy tools for the organization.
The "volunteers" come in all flavors and sometimes (rarely, but it only takes one) just don't quite exercise the proper care and feeding of tools. Or, more frequently, they let their kids run rampant and next thing you know, they've gone and broken that fancy, expensive whatchamacallit, but plead ignorance.
Renata
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wrote:

yeah. if someone asks you to participate in a volunteer project because you're the only one with any tools, run away. damhikt....
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My "being close to greatness" story is when I ran into Sam Maloof in Charlotte, NC several years ago; he was giving a lecture at UNC Charlotte that evening, which I ended up going to and was glad I did. Mutt
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Pig wrote:

Mine was when Jimmy Carter was to make a campaign appearance at a place I was doing some consulting for. The Secret Service wanted the building where they were setting up cleared. I pointed out that I was already behind schedule and wasn't going to get further behind by losing a day. The agent looked at me funny, asked if I'd be moving around, and told me "Don't make any sudden moves." He actually came back an hour or two later and talked to me about my work.
BTW, Carter never showed - running late for something else. From the voices I heard down the hall, I think Rosalyn did, but I wasn't about to go down there to find out :-).
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Mine was picnicking with David Marks this last summer. A bunch of woodnet guys and a couple of WoodCentral guys arranged a picnic when he was in Orlando doing some classes at Woodcraft, invited him, and his wife enthusiastically said yes.
Nice guy. He's not at all wooden like he seems to be on TV. Now that I've met him and talked with him, I see that his TV personality is pretty much like him. But the depth of knowledge, ability, and experience just doesn't come through like it does in person.
He brought some of the pieces that he's made on the program--one in particular was a maple (I think) bowl with an ebony ring. Everything was stunning. No sanding marks. None, Nada, Zilch. Zero. Bupkus. And the tung oil finish is awesome.
I joked with him that he uses more MDF than most of us use real wood. Awfully nice guy. And his wife is a sweetheart, too.
By the way, he sneaks tools in just like the rest of us. "That? I've had that for a long time..."
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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LRod wrote:

Lrod, were there any sanding marks? :)
Dave
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 16:42:29 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm,

Shows are like that. I leave the CC, checkbook, and crowbars at home for good reason.

He's a really nice guy, isn't he? I had the definite pleasure of attending a 3 day session with him in Sandy Eggo a while back, with the SDFWA.
He told his life story and let us in on 15 hours worth of WW tips and things he's learned during his amazing WW-filled life. That's where I picked up the idea for that sig about Hungarian paper towels. That's what he calls hand plane shavings. Whenever he needs to clean his hands, he just bends over and picks up a handful of shavings to wipe 'em.
Later I was his gopher at a handsawn dovie class he taught at the Ontario WW show. The man has some distinct and very interesting stories to tell.

Fun, but "Aw, what a letdown!" <g>
-------------------------------------- PESSIMIST: An optimist with experience -------------------------------------------- www.diversify.com - Web Database Development
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Greg G.
No offense taken, no apology necessary, though noted and appreciated.
It was hard not to go stupid on meeting Frank Klausz. It was also hard not to go "Felder!?" I always thought he was a traditional hand tools person. I'd have loved to actually see him cut some dovetails - in person. Europeans, even after being over here for decades, seem to have a graciousness about them. Perhaps it's a result of growing up in a culture where offending, even inadvertently, the wrong person could have serious, long lasting consequences. And the lack of flannel was impressive, the pressed seams in the pants were just a bonus.
As for meeting B.A.D. - he's been over to my shop a couple of times. Nice easy going guy in person and pretty sharp to boot - and I mean that in a good way.
OK - Das Loot from the WWing show
- RazerTip wood burner and several "pens" for an artist friend in Texas. Hopefully it'll get her muses ass in gear and she'll get back to being creative more often. She does huge murals, finely detailed pen and ink stuff, small sculpture, portraits in acrylic and oil and used to make floats for the Texas debutantes' balls (in Texas even the young women have balls). The wood burning tools should lead to some very interesting decorated gourds. - set of medium and fine riffler files - leather strop - a couple more jigs for the Tormek and the diamond trueing set. Got the jig to do fingernail profiles on turning tools and one for doing skew chisels. Based on the prices, I looked for but did not find the 14 KT stamp anywhere on the jigs - but it must be there somewhere. - Trend router - small and great for lettering and freehand stuff - two Sorby turning tools (turning tools are even more expensive than Lie Nielsen chisels) a long fingernail ground bowl gouge and an inside scraper with changeable tips. They were out of both but I managed to talk them into selling me the ones they used for demos at the end of the show - at a discount of course since they were used (and already honed and polished) - a set of the new Micro-Plane "sanding disks" set up for 5" hook and loop ROS Supposed to last 30 times longer than sand paper disks. They clearly state that they're not good for resouness woods. There will ba a New and Improved version coming out in Janaury of '06. Wonder if, like software, they have a discounted "upgrade price"? - set of plug cutters from Snappy Tools. These dome the top of the plug so they start easier while keeping the sides straight and square for a nice tight fit - with no glue lines.. - a slick dial a setting jig for 8 different kinds of router bits - lock miter, drawer lock, T&G, Rail and Stile (ogee profile), ... It's bright yellow so it'll be harder to lose than a bunch of set up blocks. It can be dialed in for various stock thicknesses - which the set up blocks won't do. - a set of three "spring hammer" tools, a small chisel, a self centering punch for hinge screw centers and a brad nail driver Set the tool where you want it, pull back the spring driven "hammer" and it wacks the end of the working part of the tool. May save me a black nailed thumb. - a set of wire "burning wires" for turnings - an interesting Blum cabinet door "soft close" thingamajig - basically a small. rubber tipped cylinder in a plastic "dowel". Drill a hole, slip it in and your cabinet door swings almost closed then slowly closes the last 1/2" to the cabinet frame. At $5 each theyre really pricey - but they work well and are unobstrusive - a flex shaft powered reciprocating handpiece and 5 Flex Cut type chisels for it to use for carving. I've already got a Foredom from my jewelry making days. - a pair of Kreg "Support Tabs". These go with the Drawer Guides installation jigs I already have. The latter hold the guides while installing the guides in the case. These jigs fit up under the installed drawer guides and support the drawer while you attach the guides to them. Slick jigs if you're doing drawer cabinets with sliding guides. The idea is obvious - once you've seen them and how they're used.
And the NEENER - an Macassar ebony H.N.T. Gordon spoke shave that's a work of art, feels great in hand and transitions from horizontal to convex curve acrossed the grain beautifully. The hand positions are low and close to the stock, thumbs together right behind the cutter, middle fingers over the top and down against the sides of the part, pointer fingers on the top front for holding, so it's less apt to roll and dig in. Is just as comfortable to use and hold when pulling as it is when pushing.
When a tool is designed and built by someone who actually uses it and knows the weaknesses of manufactured tools, you often end up with a better, easier to use and maintain tool.
Like Steve Knight, Mr. Gordon loves making and using his tools. He gets damn close to making one sided shaving. When someone makes something nice and useful and puts their name on it - I'll get in line to buy one. He, like Steve, is also a really nice guy.
All this stuff didnt quite add up to a grand. The balance mustve gone for parking ($7/day) Show Food ($3 for a small order of fries, $5 for a burger OR hot dog, $3 small cokes, etc.) and a surprise for some poor, emphasis on poor, guy who is agonizing on which $25-40 tool to get because he cant afford both, though he has an immediate need for both. The look on his or her face when you buy one and hand it to him or her and walk away is priceless. Next year maybe Ill Hi Ho Silver as a ride off and maybe make up a silver bullet to leave behind.
Graham Blackburn also did a great presentation on hand planes and increased my understanding of how and why they work so well - if set up properly. He also extolled the virtues of wooden planes, with thicker irons, wedges and "tap to set and adjust". He dropped in an iron, tapped the wedge in place and planed see through shavings on a quilted maple board. Then he took out a piece of cherry, tapped the plane again and took beefy cuts off it. Tapped again and went back to shaving birdseye maple. If you've tried to do that with a "modern" metal handplane, even a Lie Nielsen, you know about "slop" in the depth adjustment mechanism and the test passes that are needed before using the new setting on the real stuff. He also pointed out that wooden planes are easier to "fettle" (get the bottom flat and the sides square to the bottom) and easier to do mouth repairs on than metal planes.
He pointed out that originally, metal hand planes were developed for carpenters, not furniture makers. Metal held up better to the abuses hand tools are subjected to on construction sites..
This guys not a dyed in the wool neander but has a real passion for preserving the proper use and apperciation of tried and true tools. When a tool has several hundred years of R&D in it, by folks who made their livings with them, the result can be far superior to "the latest and greatest" out of titanium and inium coated, cryogenically treated space age wonders.
ramble mode off
charlie b
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"charlie b" wrote in message

What!?? ... no wooden planes with laser's on 'em? Gotta be the "next big thing" in wooddork marketing, doncha know....
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Last update: 10/22/05
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charlie b wrote:

Wow, that was an unexpected act of kindness in the middle of a post about all the cool stuff you bought!
When you're done here you're going to the big workshop in the sky :-)
Nice to read.
See ya,
Andy
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