You Favorite Brand Of Polyurethane?

I am curious about what people's favorite brand of poly is? I have used Minwax satin, but I don't care for the finish. About 10 years ago, I did some kitchen cabinets with a real nice poly, but I don't remember the brand. Maybe Carver Tripp?
Anyway, recommendations would be appreciated.
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brand.
I've used General for several projects and like it very much. It flows easily, builds well and takes a nice shine. You can use it as a (recommended) wiping poly or brush it on for a fast build, which I do in hidden areas. It's available at Rockler, Woodcraft, and a number of mail-order houses. Be sure to use it with a good brush.
Bob
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I've used General for several projects and like it very much. It flows

I have been using General Finishes since the late 70" and found out a couple of years that a decent small celled foam brush turns out stunning results.
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ACE Brand coatings are superior to anything else I have ever used. This includes marine arnish for outdoor use, deck and sidng stains, both transparent and opaque, floor coatings, wall primers and paints.
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RM MS wrote:

I've also used a number of ACE finishes both for wood and for metal and find it to be a great value. I would not call it superior to name brands in my experience, but it's certainly a better value. Seems every bit as capable as the name brands in standing up over time and is always much cheaper. I wouldn't use ACE paints to paint a car, but I sure use a lot of their stuff for other work.
--

-Mike-
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On Sat, 22 May 2004 11:27:01 -0500, "Buck Turgidson"
Waterlox.
Barry
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I use oil-based polyurethane, cuz its usually going on over an oil-based stain. And I like a _flat_ (*NOT* 'satin', or even 'matte') layer for the final coat (over several coats of the much harder high-gloss).
Polyurethane in a true 'flat' lustre is *hard* to find these days. Benjamin Moore, and ZAR are the _only_ brands I've been able to locate. Both are 'good stuff'. Retail around $45/gallon, 20% less at commercial supply houses.
Note: The flat lustre eliminates any question of a 'plastic-y' appearance of the polyurethane. At a distance of several feet, you "can't tell" it's there, at all.
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stain.
coat
Benjamin
houses.
of
it's
Sounds like the look I am going for on my interior doors. I'll head to the B Moore store this week.
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Be advised, you'll have to _insist_ on exactly what you want. Hardly anybody stocks the flat, and they usually have trouble even finding it in the master price list. Make 'em keep looking! <grin> I don't have the part number handy -- What I've got on hand at the moment is the ZAR -- the distributor didn't have enough Moore in stock, and it was going to be most of a week for arrival. So, I got the in-stock ZAR. <grin>
Note: repeating -- the flat poly *is* comparatively soft. You want to put on several coats (I do at least 3) of hi-gloss first, and then *one* coat of flat.
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anybody
master
on
flat.
Got it. I'll call first. Any reason why I can't use a cheaper high-gloss poly such as Minwax under the B Moore flat, or do I need Moore HG poly?
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Authoritative answer: "I dunno." <grin>
I've always used the same brand -- that way I _know_ there won't be any problems.
My _uneducated_ guess is that it probably would =not= be a problem. On the other hand, problems, if they _do_ occur, will, I'm guessing, *NOT* manifest themselves immediately. Ask me 5 years after I make up a test piece, and I'll give you an 'informed' answer. :)
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high-gloss
I'm curious. Why? You just spent 10 or 20 or 40 hours putting a project together, spent $20 to $500 on wood, why are you going to take a risk to save maybe five bucks? Ed
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Robert Bonomi wrote:

In the meantime, I'll throw out that most compatability problems present themselves quite immediately. If there are no immediate adhesion problems and the underlying wood project does not decay into a pile of goo on the table, then your probably pretty safe. If it does, then consider a liquid molding project...
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