Yet another workbench webpage


Hi,
I made a workbench. Then I made a webpage for my workbench. I'd be most appreciative if some of you could take a look and let me know what you think (of either the bench or the page).
http://home.comcast.net/~bmlerner/workbench.htm
Thanks, Brian
P.S. - I'd also like to thank those of you who've answered my questions these last few weeks. I've learned a lot here.
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bml_in snipped-for-privacy@houyhnhnm.com wrote in

Is it still that clean? Mine seems to accumulate 'stuff'.
Nice work on the bench, particularly on using Grandpa's jointer to make it. The web site is much the same: clean lines, no extra stuff.
None of this is rocket science, but I am continually surprised by how few people just do things simply, without unneeded adornment.
Good job!
Patriarch
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Very nice bench and site.
How much woodworking experience did you have before you started the bench?
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Thanks.
Outside of one set of shelves I made a couple of years ago, I had really had none until this year. I expressed an interest, so SWMBO bought me a dovetail machine (PC 4212) for Christmas, and my parents mailed me my grandfather's plane in January. Built two small bookshelves before the bench.
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Nice, I especially liked your workaround on the front dog row. I also know where you come from in planing without a bench. I built mine after trying to plane stuff in a workmate. I have a #7 too, I used mine to plane faces to laminate up the legs and stretchers, my top is a piece of 3/4" mdf between two 3/4" sheets of ply. I suppose I'm fortunate in having room for an end vice, meaning I have three rows of dog holes down the bench and a double row along the front skirt.
Peter
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bml_in snipped-for-privacy@houyhnhnm.com apparently said,on my timestamp of 24/03/2005 4:17 PM:

That arrangement for the end vise is a great idea! Well done!
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Nuno Souto
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Really great work Brian, I great solution for the end vise, I never though of that.
An idea for you to build, like your end vise shaped like an "L", another close idea is one that is a classic shoulder vise that is held by your Wilton, it has a bench screw going through it exactly this way in the link, As in the graphic: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p1134&cat=1,41659 But it can be removed, and you can utilize your sliding dovetail to mount it. I will make one myself and that dovetail gives me that idea, thanks.
Are you going to make a leg vise for the other front end?
Using that handplane from family is a really good value too. You should go there and dig out as much as possible.
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Alex
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bml_in snipped-for-privacy@houyhnhnm.com wrote:

Nice work on both the page and the bench. I especially like your improvised end-vise. In fact, I think I'll steal it and retrofit my bench. :-) I currently use a planing stop that's held in my leg vise for holding long boards, but your method would give me quite a bit more flexibility. (You can see a pic of my bench at:
http://uweb.txstate.edu/~cv01/bench03.jpg )
So it looks like the biggest lesson you learned was how much time you could save in the long run by taking your time when doing the glueup for the top. That was stressed to me by some wreck regulars (the late, great Paully Rad and Bob Z) when I was making mine. As a result, I did a full clamping dry-run, arranging boards so their grain was all in one direction and marking them in the order they were to be assembled (with crayon, which "lubed" the handplane when I surfaced the top).
When it came time to glueup, I added one board at a time, making sure that one face was as close to perfectly flush as I could get it (Bessey K-bodies are great for this). Doing it this way meant it took me over a week to do the glueup, but I had very little trouble doing the final surfacing and smoothing of the top. (Heck, I even used the "wrong" plane for most if it; having just gotten a L-N #62 I was eager to put it to work.)
But I digress. :-) Good work, and now you can take what you learned and start planning your ultimate bench. :-)
Chuck Vance
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bml_in snipped-for-privacy@houyhnhnm.com wrote:

The worst looking misuse of timber I've seen in years. If you bring that to me along with the other poster's radioactive General table saw, I will be glad to dispose of it for you in a safe manner. :)
I didn't bother to follow up on all the links to what's what and stuff. I found it interesting that you had both round and square dog holes. That's a pretty good idea that you probably ripped off from whatever source inspired you, but hey, a good idea is a good idea.
It looks pretty darn spiffy to me. Um. I mean, it's obviously a POS, so if you drop it off in my front yard, I will take care of it for you, so you won't have to look at the misshapen monstrosity any longer.
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